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Thread: Fixing a soft spot for a driveway

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    Martian's Avatar
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    Fixing a soft spot for a driveway

    I've been working my land at the cabin the last couple weekends now. The only thing I'm questioning what I should be doing is I have a soft spot, that's really soft. There was water sitting there in the spring, but quickly dried up. About 50 yards farther down the drive in progress there is what looks to be swamp land. About 50 yards long itself that was wet all up until late June. I've really built the swamp land up with gravel and some 6" corrugated pipe, perforated with sock and it's hard as a rock. I drive over with the 110 and you see no movement. The problem is the 50 yards before I can STAND and sink in an inch. The 110 drives over the softest area and it will sink in 8-10 inches or more. I've built this 15 foot long area up with nearly 15 yards of gravel and it still doesn't compact. I'm going to pop a drain tile in underneath this weekend, just so it will let any water build up flow. I've thought about excavating all the 'gunk' out until it's hard and filling it all back in with pea rock and gravel, but that is hardly economical and a lot of work. Since I'm in the process of building the driveway, I want to make sure this will hold up to cement trucks and such when we decide to build a house. I don't have any pictures, but I will get some this weekend while I'm there. Any ideas on what you would do would help. Thanks in advance.
    2005 Deere 110 TLB - 3rd function loader, 3 rear remotes, thumb, top n tilt
    2000 Deere 5410 - 541 SL loader, 2 rear remotes, canopy
    2005 Deere Diesel HPX Gator - homemade cab, snow plow, hydraulic dump
    1953 Farmall Cub - front plow
    1984 Ford F8000 - Cat 3208 Diesel, 5+2 transmission, 8 yard dump
    2006 GMC 4500 Topkick Pickup outfitted by Monroe Truck

    Everyone has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases - Jeremy Collier

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    has15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martian View Post
    I've been working my land at the cabin the last couple weekends now. The only thing I'm questioning what I should be doing is I have a soft spot, that's really soft. There was water sitting there in the spring, but quickly dried up. About 50 yards farther down the drive in progress there is what looks to be swamp land. About 50 yards long itself that was wet all up until late June. I've really built the swamp land up with gravel and some 6" corrugated pipe, perforated with sock and it's hard as a rock. I drive over with the 110 and you see no movement. The problem is the 50 yards before I can STAND and sink in an inch. The 110 drives over the softest area and it will sink in 8-10 inches or more. I've built this 15 foot long area up with nearly 15 yards of gravel and it still doesn't compact. I'm going to pop a drain tile in underneath this weekend, just so it will let any water build up flow. I've thought about excavating all the 'gunk' out until it's hard and filling it all back in with pea rock and gravel, but that is hardly economical and a lot of work. Since I'm in the process of building the driveway, I want to make sure this will hold up to cement trucks and such when we decide to build a house. I don't have any pictures, but I will get some this weekend while I'm there. Any ideas on what you would do would help. Thanks in advance.
    Hey Martian,
    I have done miles of this kind of work. You mentioned excavating out the muck and back filling with good martieral, that is the best thing to do, but like you said a lot of work. What I would try is dig out about 12"-24" of the mock an if you have a sorce for crushed concrete use the bigger size stuff 3"- 6" stuff and start dumping it in to the hole. DO NOT use any round stone, it wll just keep sinking and will not lock together, after you get the drive stablelized top it off with what ever you choose, I would still recamend crushed stuff like the smaller 21A crushed concrete or lime stone. this method works good and if the drive still sinks in the future just add more crusher run and keep driving on it. Good luck.
    Jeff


    2012 X540
    Rim Guard loaded rear tires
    48'' Snow Plow with Angle Kit
    52''X24'' Lawn Roller

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to has15 For This Useful Post:

    andy b. (07-25-2012), Martian (07-25-2012)

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    Martian's Avatar
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    Thanks has ...

    This is kind of what I figured, just hoping someone would have a easier way. I love seat time as much as the next person, but I also love my weekends!
    2005 Deere 110 TLB - 3rd function loader, 3 rear remotes, thumb, top n tilt
    2000 Deere 5410 - 541 SL loader, 2 rear remotes, canopy
    2005 Deere Diesel HPX Gator - homemade cab, snow plow, hydraulic dump
    1953 Farmall Cub - front plow
    1984 Ford F8000 - Cat 3208 Diesel, 5+2 transmission, 8 yard dump
    2006 GMC 4500 Topkick Pickup outfitted by Monroe Truck

    Everyone has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases - Jeremy Collier

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    has15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martian View Post
    Thanks has ...

    This is kind of what I figured, just hoping someone would have a easier way. I love seat time as much as the next person, but I also love my weekends!
    The big crushed concrete can do a lot of good on its own. If it is going to be awhile till you plan to run heavy trucks across it, just start dumping the crusher run on the drive and driving as much weight as you have across it. This is a coin toss as to if it will support the weight of concrete trucks. Most concrete trucks are 6 wheel drive and should be able to make it across the drive, but I would suggest having a load of stone on hand to fill in the rutts after each load of concrete.
    Jeff


    2012 X540
    Rim Guard loaded rear tires
    48'' Snow Plow with Angle Kit
    52''X24'' Lawn Roller

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    Martian's Avatar
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    I have a ton of brush, what about putting some of it under as a base? Some of the bigger stuff seems like it would work well? I had some gravel dropped off this week, but this driveway is getting expensive, quickly!

    I'm a while (5-10 years) from cement trucks etc going back there, but I want to do it right at not have to deal with it.
    2005 Deere 110 TLB - 3rd function loader, 3 rear remotes, thumb, top n tilt
    2000 Deere 5410 - 541 SL loader, 2 rear remotes, canopy
    2005 Deere Diesel HPX Gator - homemade cab, snow plow, hydraulic dump
    1953 Farmall Cub - front plow
    1984 Ford F8000 - Cat 3208 Diesel, 5+2 transmission, 8 yard dump
    2006 GMC 4500 Topkick Pickup outfitted by Monroe Truck

    Everyone has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases - Jeremy Collier

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    RRMCCABE's Avatar
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    Highway fabric works great for stuff like this.

    As mentioned above rock pushes into the dirt. The fabric stops it from doing that and increases the load capacity of the rock.

    When I built my house it was terribly wet. We rolled out fabric, put 2-3" diameter crushed concrete on it about 6" deep and immediately drove large trucks on it.

    It was also 'mucky' when I dug the basement so we dug the foundation 12" extra deep, added fabric and then 12" of large rock. Footings went on top of that.

    Here is a picture of rock and fabric.

    I am a big fan of this fabric.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fixing a soft spot for a driveway-dsc00858.jpg  
    PaDave likes this.
    1967 John Deere 110 (round fender) tiller & Model 80 Cart
    2010 John Deere 2305, 200cx loader and 62" MMM, 54" blower, I-Match

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    has15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martian View Post
    I have a ton of brush, what about putting some of it under as a base? Some of the bigger stuff seems like it would work well? I had some gravel dropped off this week, but this driveway is getting expensive, quickly!

    I'm a while (5-10 years) from cement trucks etc going back there, but I want to do it right at not have to deal with it.
    Not sure I would use the brush, But I have seen logs 6"- 8" in dia layed side by side across drives/roads for a base.
    Jeff


    2012 X540
    Rim Guard loaded rear tires
    48'' Snow Plow with Angle Kit
    52''X24'' Lawn Roller

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    Brian's Avatar
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    I am lookign at building a driveway back to my land and the excavator said I needed crushed concrete. The issue I dislike about that is the re-rod in it. That can kill tires! But it makes sense and I will probably go that way, but be carefull driving on it until its covered in gravel.
    Brian

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    RRMCCABE's Avatar
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    Never had issues finding re-bar but have found some wire mat. That can be hard on tires as well. I personally wouldn't want anything under the drive that could decompose like brush. When it does you have a lot of money in concrete that is going to settle.
    1967 John Deere 110 (round fender) tiller & Model 80 Cart
    2010 John Deere 2305, 200cx loader and 62" MMM, 54" blower, I-Match

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    Martian's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies. I guess I'll look into some crushed concrete. Definitely don't want this to be a lingering problem.
    2005 Deere 110 TLB - 3rd function loader, 3 rear remotes, thumb, top n tilt
    2000 Deere 5410 - 541 SL loader, 2 rear remotes, canopy
    2005 Deere Diesel HPX Gator - homemade cab, snow plow, hydraulic dump
    1953 Farmall Cub - front plow
    1984 Ford F8000 - Cat 3208 Diesel, 5+2 transmission, 8 yard dump
    2006 GMC 4500 Topkick Pickup outfitted by Monroe Truck

    Everyone has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases - Jeremy Collier

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