My 30 x 40 tractor garage
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    eepete's Avatar
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    My 30 x 40 tractor garage

    Here's a bunch of posts that show how a new tractor garage went together in 2009-2010. It will take quite a few posts to tell the story, so bear with me- I'll let you know when it's done. It's hard to proof read this much text, so bear with me. I'll edit as I find things.

    One common theme in this project is this: This is a Tractor Garage. It is not a shop. I'll do a lot of little servicing items here including fluid changes and small repairs. But I don't expect to do a lot of major repair or design work. That decision affects a lot of choices that were made. I consider a garage to be much cheaper than a shop. A shop would cost as much as a house per square foot, and would have a main room, dirty room (for welding), a paint area, bathroom, and some storage. A garage lets you park vehicles and do minor work on them.

    The area where the garage will go is south of the house. This is also where the garage on the house is. I have my electronics shop above the garage, and through a window have a good view of the entire site. The 1st picture shows the site, complete with left over top soil pile from construction of the house (which finished in late 2007).

    It is clear that I'll need to do a little earth moving on this job. I got a new tractor in the fall of 2009, which is part of why I needed a garage. It's a JD 4520 (60 HP, hydro, 50HP PTO, CAB). I've had a Kubota B21 since 1997 and love it. Clearly these two colors work well together. When I got a ball park quote on some of the grading cost (both clearing, leveling, and final grading) it was closet to the cost of a box blade. No brainer there, the 2nd picture shows which way I went!

    Another project was started before this- it's a photovoltaic power system (aka solar cells). This will be a grid tie inverter system, about 8KW DC, 6KW AC. I started this project before I had a firm date on when the building would show up. So the are in the 3rd picture is where the solar panels will go. I've scrapped the top soil off as my 1st project with the box blade. Note also the conduit and 4x4 post in the lower left of the picture. These are pipes that go into the basement of the house so that when I got around to building a tractor garage, I could get back to the house. I also ran conduit out to where the PV array will go, you can see a drywall bucket on that. On the right, you see lumber that has been delivered for a small shed that will house the inverter for the PV project.
    I got a lot done one the PV project before this- you can see conduit pipes sticking up. All the trench work, ground wires, and conduit for the solar project are in. When that project is done, I'll post that project.

    The building will be a Morton County Craft 30' x 40'. There is a build date of December 1st, so it's time to get the site ready. The building will go right where the top soil pile is, so the 1st order of business is to move that. It will be just behind/south of the new garage. Seems like there is no more pure form of seat time that moving a pile of something with a FEL.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1_before.jpg   box_blade_and_4520.jpg   2_solar_topsoil.jpg   3_pile_moved.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
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    eepete's Avatar
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    Time to course grade where the building will go. After my using the box blade to clear out the topsoil for the PV project, I decided that a hydraulic top link would be nice. When I got the JD 4520, I got the 3rd SCV so I could control it. Got the top link from CCM. Now to take the top soil off, add it to the pile, and do the course grading. I needed to cut down by 6" on the south west side (upper right in the picture) and fill by 8" on the north east (lower left by the conduits from the house). I put some of the dirt into the trenches left over from the geothermal system for the house. It takes 2 years for a 6' trench to settle all the way. You can see those as "mud streaks" on the left of the first picture.
    On the outside of the cleared area, I went about 6' more out to get ready for final grad once the building was in. I had to use the sidling to get that flat. I found myself wishing I'd listen to all the people who recommended the TnT for the tractor.

    With the building site clear, I turned my attention to the approach to the garage. I took off about 4" of top soil, making yet another pile as you can see in the second picture. I had a stack of leftover pallets from construction sitting in the way. No job is ever done, is it?

    The 3rd picture is a stitched shot of the entire job site. The 2nd story window really helps here. For those who have heard of the red clay of the south, here you go.

    The 4th picture sets up the next step, the 8" of fill on the north east side. Got the laser level when doing the house and it was one of those "why didn't I get this sooner" things. Great for this sort of thing, and for drainage pipes.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 4_course_building_grading.jpg   5_course_driveway_grading.jpg   6_course_grading.jpg   7_laser_level_ready.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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    eepete's Avatar
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    In the first picture you see the laser level in the middle of the building,I put a ring of crusher run so that it was just outside of the building perimeter. Then I will fill with washed stone (1/2 " to 3/4" sized).

    The 2nd picture shows the garage driveway work. I put down some landscape cloth, then a thin layer of pea gravel, then railroad balast, then crusher run. You can see the washed stone that I had delivered, it's the next step. It will be used to fill the garage area, and to cover the crusher run.

    The 3rd picture is another stitched shot of the project. You can see the fill where the garage will be. That is now level to within about an inch. I've not dealt with the problem of the aprons and the level of the driveway, so there is a muddy no mans land between the garage and the drive leading to it.
    The long, straight section is there so that the section off the existing driveway is a clean exit, different from the garage. The gravel you see at the bottom of the picture is off of the existing garage on the house. I also wanted a long area so I can park tractors there if I need space to do some small project in the garage. A straight approach also means I am less likely to take out the side of the garage. All entry and exit are straight on approaches. Finally, this is a good area to blow off the grass after mowing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 8_gravel_leveling_building.jpg   9_gravel_leveling_driveway.jpg   10_gravel_done.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
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    eepete's Avatar
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    Well, now it's time to get my schist together. So I rented a compactor. Made a huge difference, especially on the crusher run. I also packed the driveway, which was a big win. When I drove the tractor on it, it stayed put after compaction.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 11_compaction_time.jpg   12_compaction_done.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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    eepete's Avatar
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    The building materials were delivered, but it was not until around December 10th that weather allowed for construction. This was the worst winter in a long time for doing outdoor stuff. From October to February, we never went more than 5 days without rain or snow. But the weather looked good, and the crew from Morton showed up to put up the building.

    The 1st picture shows them drilling down 4.5' 14" diameter for the posts. The hole they are digging in this shot took as long as all the other holes put together. If you look behind the tractor, you'll see the spoil piles of clay. This spoil pile is yellow. This is a hard type of clay-rock that runs in veins on the property. My B21 and I have spent 3 hours going 4' when I've hit this stuff going to a depth of 2.5'. It's backhoe, manual mattox, say "golly gee" a few times, and then backhoe. They really had to dig here. So the middle post on the west side is basically drilled in rock. That's good, that's where any shear wind will come from.
    Oh yeah, the faces have been blurred out. It was a great crew, we got along well, I just don't like posting pictures of people without their permission.

    The 2nd picture shows the concrete truck showing up. The posts had a metal jig on the bottom that insured that the post was setting on about 8" of concrete. Then about 16 to 20 inches of concrete cover the bottom of the post. All the strings are setup and using those and levels the posts are set.

    The 3rd picture shows the end of the 1st day. The posts are set.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 13_post_holes_dug.jpg   14_post_set.jpg   15_1st_day_done.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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    eepete's Avatar
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    Now the building gets framed. The 1st picture shows that in progress.

    The 2nd picture shows the completed framing, day 2 is done.

    The3rd picture shows the start of siding on the 3rd day. The tractor is quite something. It's a FEL and PHD, and has a scaffold that can have it's height and tilt set hydraulically. This specialized tractor is the key is the perfect complement to the crew's abilities. No, I don't have anything to do with Morton I was just amazed at how smooth it all went. I think they've done this a time or two.

    The 4th shot is near the end of the 4th and last day. All that is left is the Wainscotting siding, facia and soffet. The concrete and garage doors are done by subcontractors hired by Morton.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 16_framing_day.jpg   17_framing_done.jpg   18_siding_starts.jpg   19_siding_roof_done.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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    eepete's Avatar
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    Well now it's going to get ugly. It's about 35 degrees out, wind blowing, it's rained, and the mud is either wet or frozen. It's time to dig up those conduit stubs and re-work them into the building. A big of backhoe time, but a lot more crouching in a ditch in the cold and wet with a shovel. This is kinda the opposite of the "move the topsoil pile" seat time experience.

    The1st picture shows the conduit after it's been uncovered.This is down about 2-1/2 to 3 feet deep. There is a 3" electrical conduit, and 3" drainage PVC for other stuff, another 3" PVC for more future expansion beyond any tractor garage, and two smaller conduits that go to the solar project area.

    The 2nd picture shows the final result of getting these conduits up into the building. I dug to within about 1.5' of the building with the backhoe. It was one of those push it too far and put the bucket in the building and you'll be kicking yourself moments. The last 2' of excavation I would do by hand. It turned out to be a big chunk of soapstone, so it was me and the mattox together again. All this took about 2 days. The end depth was 3'. You can see the horizontal ground rod in the trench. BTW, all this conduit work and all of the building was permited and inspected by the county, so everything is on the up and up.

    The 3rd picture shows the reworked ground area we saw in the 1st picture. I pack the dirt and gravel around the pipes to reduce trench collapse in the following year.

    The 4th shot shows the conduit coming up into the building. I've put another round of wood below the 2x6 band that Morton put on the building. This is in the 8" of fill area. There is going to be 4 more inches of gravel added by Morton before the concrete. Once the conduit was in, I put in the last board, and then on the outside put in a layer of crusher run to support it. The final product hides the mess it was to get it done, from the cold to the well diggers patoot problems.

    We had some rains and the fill around the columns sank a bit. I further compressed with a sledge hammer, and then put about 4" of stone on top of it which I then compressed with the sledge again. This will leave a 1 foot collar around each post when the pad is poured. Between that and the concrete base, the posts are well anchored even though it's not solid concrete fill.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20_conduit_dig.jpg   21_conduit_run.jpg   22_conduit_final.jpg   23_conduit_inside.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
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    eepete's Avatar
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    The concrete subcontractor put in the 4" of washed stone. It was leveled such that it would make a 5" pad. The standard pad is 4", I paid a bit extra to get a 5" pad. This would put the bottom of pad about 1" below the 1st band of boards that came with the building (or, about 1" below where the Morton band and the wood I added meet).

    I asked if they were going to compact the stone. They said it was self-compacting. So I said "Well then, I guess it won't be a problem if I rent a compactor and beat on it then, will it?" So I did. If you look closely you cans the difference between the stone as it fell, and the compacted stone. I probably picked up about 1/2 to 3/4" by compacting the stone, making the pad just under 6" deep.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 24_final_gravel_compact.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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    eepete's Avatar
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    The standard concrete is fiber fill or mesh. I went with mesh, and told Morton I'd be putting in some rebar. They were OK with that, and the flatwork contractor just cut the mesh and left it outside. After the termite treatment, I put down their plastic then I put down another layer of 6 mil plastic. That meant I could walk on the plastic and not puncture the top layer. A lessoned learned from building the house.

    The 1st picture shows what things looked like after a few days. At the last moment, I bought some PEX pipe so I could heat the pad. The #3 rebar and the PEX pipe are on a 3' square pattern. Brick pieces hold up the rebar and mess, and the pipe is run with this rebar. I put tape around the PEX where it would contact the brick so it wouldn't be damaged during the pour. The pipe is the special oxygen barrier type you are supposed to use for this sort of thing.

    The 2nd picture is another view of this from a higher angle. I connected all the pipe together and put air on it (100 PSI) to see if it held. It did, and then I left the pressure at 60 pounds all during the pour so I could tell if there was a problem (not that I had any great plan if something went wrong, but I did have some splices and left over pipe).

    The two pipes you see on the right are a power pipe and 3" drain PVC that go to the inverter shed. I made the inverter shed bigger than it needed to be so I could put the air compressor in there. It will be very nice to do things in the garage and not have to be in the same room as the air compressor.

    When we got the inspection, I got a surprise! I was asked if this was a garage or shop. I proudly said "It's a garage!". Well, it turns out that if you build a garage you need either a drain pipe or a slight slope to the floor. Shops have a flat floor. Putting in a drain pipe would be hard with all that rebar down, so I decided to bring the pad up in the back of the building by 1.5". You can see the line along the bottom board, and see how it's lower in the front than in the rear. So the 5" pad went to 5.75", and at the back it's up to almost 7" thick.

    One other comment on the PEX pipe. There is no insulation in the floor. My goal here is _not_ to heat the room to 65 degrees, but to have the pad at about 50 degrees which is ground temperature around here in the winter. That's the temperature of the water that comes out for the geothermal system. So some day as yet another project (I have a friend who respectfully and nicely calls me "The Project Whore") I want to try a solar hot water and PV panel to automatically heat the pad in the garage. If that pad is near 50 degrees, that will be a huge success. Note also that the pipe, especially near the back of the garage, is down about 4" from the top of the pad. As I understand it, for radiant heat the pipe really wants to be 2.5" from the top. So we're back to "It's a garage" and a garage at 50 degrees in the dead of winter is a huge win. And the rebar is down way below the middle of the pad, which is where it should be.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 25_rebar_wide.jpg   26_rebar_manifold.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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    eepete's Avatar
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    A Pour Day

    What other sort of adventure can you have where a pour day has concrete results?

    1st shot is the concrete going down. I was pulling up the mesh, as were the workers. You can also see in the lower right a height stake they put in.

    The 2nd shot shows the rebar and mesh for the 8' apron. you can see the keyway at the building edge. Four pieces of #3 rebar go into the pad and will keep the apron attached. A pieces of #4 (1/2") rebar is right up agains the keyway (6" from it), and the same is true on the other side. Since this is a maximum stress point, I beefed up the rebar size and spacing here. Note that I can attach the rebar because I'm in the south and the apron won't move with frost heaves. Talk to the locals to figure out how your apron should (or should not) be attached to your slab.

    I messed up. I thought the 8' was from the _inside_ edge of the building, it was from the outside. So when I dug the apron and made it for a 2" drop over 8', I came up short. They measure the apron's 8' from the outside of the building. So the apron thickness is 5" except for the last foot, where it tappers down to 3.5" (the 2x4 height). I tossed in an old #4 rebar in hopes it would help.

    3rd shot is the smoothing. The temperature that day was 65 degrees, and we had low humidity. A good day to pour. They were there until 11:00 that night working it. It got down to 38 that night. I had one crack in the apron where I didn't have enough blankets to cover the last 2'. Glad I had the rebar in mesh in there- the crack should stay put.

    The 4th shot is something I had them do at the door. I also had to play with the heights to keep my 5" pad (minimum). I had them cut down about 1" at the door so that water would not blow in. The doors face west, so they get hammered in a heavy rain. It all worked great. The garage has two doors, a 10' x 10' and a 12' by 8.5' high. The 8.5' high means the bump up is not a problem for the tractor FOPS or Cab, and is not a problem with the apron 2" drop and final grading. No water incursion, just drive in, life will be good.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 27_concrete_down.jpg   28_apron_rebar.jpg   29_concrete_smooth.jpg   49_concrete_cut.jpg  
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
    Volunteer Firefighter.

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