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    Water pressure

    Don't know if I'm posting in the right place here. I have a question about water pressure. Does anyone know what the safe or highest water pressure you can have in a house. What is the safe limit for water faucets & all the standard stuff like dish washers, washing machines, etc.

    The main line I have is 3/4" & it branches off to 1/2" lines. I'm measuring 30 pounds at the outside hose connection that is closest to the main supply. My other hose connections which are 40 feet & 60 feet away from the main line are also measuring 30 pounds. There is a pressure regulating valve on the main line, but it has no valve handle or gauge on it. I'm told that regulator valves in general do not have a gauge or a valve handle on them. That sounds odd to me, but that's what everyone is telling me.

    There's no way I can measure pressure on the water company's line from the meter to the house. The water company has told me that their line pressure should be around 70 pounds! They said they would come out and measure it for me if I suspect there is a problem with their line. At this point I think that the pressure regulator valve has gone bad or it is just set too low. Anyone have an opinion on this. I want to increase the pressure at the regulator valve, but I don't know what's safe for the branch plumbing & appliances, fixtures, etc. Also the pipes here are white-PVC.

    The low water pressure is a pain. When the dishwasher is going or if one of the toilets are flushed, water flow goes down to a trickle at a sink faucet until the toilet fills or the dishwasher shuts off the water as it cycles. Thanks.

    Last edited by Maddog; 10-05-2015 at 10:37 AM. Reason: ad PVC

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    I know that dishwashers and other appliances are designed for 70 PSI. That's pretty much the U.S. standard for public water systems. Sometimes if you are at the beginning of the system you can see pressures slightly above that. If you are at the far end it often drops to 30-35PSI by the time it gets that far due to build-up in the pipes and everyone else drawing water off the system.

    I'd get the town to come out and measure what is getting to your house before doing anything else. I had some issues with the public water at my house up in Maine and ended up installing a pressure gauge right after the water meter. That was the only way I could tell whether issues were mine or their's.

    And, yeah, I don't see many pressure regulators with valve handles. They usually have either a bolt or screw adjustment. Valve handles are too easy for someone to just walk by and twist and mess things up for you.
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    I've been down this road with the water department in TN. They test pressure at your connection to their line, standard here was 60-70 psi. The problem we had was our house sat 200' above the meter and there was a big pressure drop by the time the water got to the house. Ended up having to remove the pressure regulator entirely in order to get consistent water at the house, and considered adding a pressurized storage tank as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maddog View Post
    Don't know if I'm posting in the right place here. I have a question about water pressure. Does anyone know what the safe or highest water pressure you can have in a house. What is the safe limit for water faucets & all the standard stuff like dish washers, washing machines, etc.

    The main line I have is 3/4" & it branches off to 1/2" lines. I'm measuring 30 pounds at the outside hose connection that is closest to the main supply. My other hose connections which are 40 feet & 60 feet away from the main line are also measuring 30 pounds. There is a pressure regulating valve on the main line, but it has no valve handle or gauge on it. I'm told that regulator valves in general do not have a gauge or a valve handle on them. That sounds odd to me, but that's what everyone is telling me.

    There's no way I can measure pressure on the water company's line from the meter to the house. The water company has told me that their line pressure should be around 70 pounds! They said they would come out and measure it for me if I suspect there is a problem with their line. At this point I think that the pressure regulator valve has gone bad or it is just set too low. Anyone have an opinion on this. I want to increase the pressure at the regulator valve, but I don't know what's safe for the branch plumbing & appliances, fixtures, etc. Also the pipes here are white-PVC.

    The low water pressure is a pain. When the dishwasher is going or if one of the toilets are flushed, water flow goes down to a trickle at a sink faucet until the toilet fills or the dishwasher shuts off the water as it cycles. Thanks.

    As Jim said I would have the water people come out, and just remember this, if you have a well and I know you do not, the pressure switch cuts in around 35lbs and shuts down at around 60lbs adjustable to what you want but that's an average and the pressure switches come set to that from the factory for well tanks.. Your pipes should be able to handle 60 lbs. of pressure with no issues, if the job was done correctly that is! Good luck and I would also install a pressure gauge, after the meter of course.. you shouldn't have to suffer with 35 pounds all the time.. I can almost pee that pressure on a good day.. ya 40 years ago maybe!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maddog View Post
    Don't know if I'm posting in the right place here. I have a question about water pressure. Does anyone know what the safe or highest water pressure you can have in a house. What is the safe limit for water faucets & all the standard stuff like dish washers, washing machines, etc.

    The main line I have is 3/4" & it branches off to 1/2" lines. I'm measuring 30 pounds at the outside hose connection that is closest to the main supply. My other hose connections which are 40 feet & 60 feet away from the main line are also measuring 30 pounds. There is a pressure regulating valve on the main line, but it has no valve handle or gauge on it. I'm told that regulator valves in general do not have a gauge or a valve handle on them. That sounds odd to me, but that's what everyone is telling me.

    There's no way I can measure pressure on the water company's line from the meter to the house. The water company has told me that their line pressure should be around 70 pounds! They said they would come out and measure it for me if I suspect there is a problem with their line. At this point I think that the pressure regulator valve has gone bad or it is just set too low. Anyone have an opinion on this. I want to increase the pressure at the regulator valve, but I don't know what's safe for the branch plumbing & appliances, fixtures, etc. Also the pipes here are white-PVC.

    The low water pressure is a pain. When the dishwasher is going or if one of the toilets are flushed, water flow goes down to a trickle at a sink faucet until the toilet fills or the dishwasher shuts off the water as it cycles. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimR View Post
    I know that dishwashers and other appliances are designed for 70 PSI. That's pretty much the U.S. standard for public water systems. Sometimes if you are at the beginning of the system you can see pressures slightly above that. If you are at the far end it often drops to 30-35PSI by the time it gets that far due to build-up in the pipes and everyone else drawing water off the system.

    I'd get the town to come out and measure what is getting to your house before doing anything else. I had some issues with the public water at my house up in Maine and ended up installing a pressure gauge right after the water meter. That was the only way I could tell whether issues were mine or their's.

    And, yeah, I don't see many pressure regulators with valve handles. They usually have either a bolt or screw adjustment. Valve handles are too easy for someone to just walk by and twist and mess things up for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by 56FordGuy View Post
    I've been down this road with the water department in TN. They test pressure at your connection to their line, standard here was 60-70 psi. The problem we had was our house sat 200' above the meter and there was a big pressure drop by the time the water got to the house. Ended up having to remove the pressure regulator entirely in order to get consistent water at the house, and considered adding a pressurized storage tank as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by jefftaylor View Post
    As Jim said I would have the water people come out, and just remember this, if you have a well and I know you do not, the pressure switch cuts in around 35lbs and shuts down at around 60lbs adjustable to what you want but that's an average and the pressure switches come set to that from the factory for well tanks.. Your pipes should be able to handle 60 lbs. of pressure with no issues, if the job was done correctly that is! Good luck and I would also install a pressure gauge, after the meter of course.. you shouldn't have to suffer with 35 pounds all the time.. I can almost pee that pressure on a good day.. ya 40 years ago maybe!
    Thank you all. It sounds like household appliances can at least handle up to 60 lbs. pressure with no issues, if as Jeff says the job was done right.
    I took another look again down in the box where my water meter & service line are. I have a box in the ground (provided by the water co.). Inside the box is a shutoff which I can control, the meter & after the meter, what looks like a one way valve to prevent any type of back flow from my house into the water system. I don't see any place where I can hook my water pressure gauge to however. I'm going to try the pressure regulator valve in my crawlspace first. I will crack it open a tad & see what I get on my pressure gauge. If I see an increase in pressure, I will slowly boost it up in increments & see what happens. If that works-Great. If not I will ask the water company to come take a look. Fortunately, my water company is only ten minutes down the road. I've already talked to them & they have told me that if I really need to get the line pressure evaluated, they would be more than glad to send someone over to do. I'm sure that somewhere in that ground level meter box there must be a place to get a gauge on but how they do it I'm clueless. I don't think they would like me fooling with it either & there is no need because they will come out on a courtesy call to help at no charge to me. Thanks everyone.
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    I would be calling the water company if you only have 30# of pressure if they claim you should have maybe 70 ...

    We used well water for over 40ys ,, always set reg to 50 on 55 off, and no problems in the house.

    When we put in city water the other year, was told by water company theirs would be 50 I asked to have it put to 57

    Was also advised my wife cousins ,happens to be over the city water ,to plumb in a couple of gauges .

    so
    In my basement I put a one way valve, then a shutoff valve on line after it enters the basement.
    Then a Pressure gauge ,

    Then a Pressure regulator , it is set for 55

    Then another pressure gauge
    and
    then another shut off valve.


    This way as Bill was telling me I can see what pressure they are giving me and I can tell what my regulator is giving to me . Plus if any thing needs to be replaced shut off valves are all in a small area and easy to get at. Yes I have already had to have water company come and replace 2 regulators in the past 2 yrs . The only way I knew something was wrong by checking the pressure gauges.

    Cost a little more to begin with ,but IMO well worth the money.

    Wish you luck
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    tj1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maddog View Post
    Thank you all. It sounds like household appliances can at least handle up to 60 lbs. pressure with no issues, if as Jeff says the job was done right.
    I took another look again down in the box where my water meter & service line are. I have a box in the ground (provided by the water co.). Inside the box is a shutoff which I can control, the meter & after the meter, what looks like a one way valve to prevent any type of back flow from my house into the water system. I don't see any place where I can hook my water pressure gauge to however. I'm going to try the pressure regulator valve in my crawlspace first. I will crack it open a tad & see what I get on my pressure gauge. If I see an increase in pressure, I will slowly boost it up in increments & see what happens. If that works-Great. If not I will ask the water company to come take a look. Fortunately, my water company is only ten minutes down the road. I've already talked to them & they have told me that if I really need to get the line pressure evaluated, they would be more than glad to send someone over to do. I'm sure that somewhere in that ground level meter box there must be a place to get a gauge on but how they do it I'm clueless. I don't think they would like me fooling with it either & there is no need because they will come out on a courtesy call to help at no charge to me. Thanks everyone.
    Maddog, remember the water company can set your pressure, they have to. The pressure coming into your home is way more than your pipes can hold or stay together so to speak. If you want it 60lbs just let them know and their pressure valve will be set to that figure. Normally 60 is what they set the pressure too at least around here and they do have a back flow preventer also as you mentioned so you cannot contaminate city or town water.. The only time I didn't get pressure was a job I did way up on a hill and we had to install a pump and tank to get the pressure to where you could flush a toilet on the second floor while someone was running water in the kitchen sink! Good luck and have a nice day. Jeff
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    Quote Originally Posted by jefftaylor View Post
    Maddog, remember the water company can set your pressure, they have to. The pressure coming into your home is way more than your pipes can hold or stay together so to speak. If you want it 60lbs just let them know and their pressure valve will be set to that figure. Normally 60 is what they set the pressure too at least around here and they do have a back flow preventer also as you mentioned so you cannot contaminate city or town water.. The only time I didn't get pressure was a job I did way up on a hill and we had to install a pump and tank to get the pressure to where you could flush a toilet on the second floor while someone was running water in the kitchen sink! Good luck and have a nice day. Jeff
    Y'all are lucky being able to get that much pressure from the "water works".
    Down here, the best they can do is 35 lbs., has always been that way.
    The volunteer fire department has their own tanker trucks because the water mains can't supply enough
    water for the pumpers.
    Need to get off my butt and get a booster pump for the house, been thinking about that for years.
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    tj1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Cajun View Post
    Y'all are lucky being able to get that much pressure from the "water works".
    Down here, the best they can do is 35 lbs., has always been that way.
    The volunteer fire department has their own tanker trucks because the water mains can't supply enough
    water for the pumpers.
    Need to get off my butt and get a booster pump for the house, been thinking about that for years.
    Cajun, your pressure sounds like Jamaica's! All gravity feed systems, you get what flows and that's it, (they didn't even need to glue PVC together for outdoor showers).. The large new hotels have booster pumps so the Tourists feel right at home.. Us, when we went to Negril for 15 years in a row (last time was 13 years ago) we were just fine with the way it was, no complaints. Give me a nice round hut with a roof and an outdoor shower with the ocean 15 feet away and I'm good,, no fancy frills needed just getting away from all this around here was enough.. I wonder why where you are they can't supply more than 35 pounds? Do you know? Maybe the supply pipes can't deal with more pressure?
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    Quote Originally Posted by etcallhome View Post
    I would be calling the water company if you only have 30# of pressure if they claim you should have maybe 70 ...

    We used well water for over 40ys ,, always set reg to 50 on 55 off, and no problems in the house.

    When we put in city water the other year, was told by water company theirs would be 50 I asked to have it put to 57

    Was also advised my wife cousins ,happens to be over the city water ,to plumb in a couple of gauges .

    so
    In my basement I put a one way valve, then a shutoff valve on line after it enters the basement.
    Then a Pressure gauge ,

    Then a Pressure regulator , it is set for 55

    Then another pressure gauge
    and
    then another shut off valve.


    This way as Bill was telling me I can see what pressure they are giving me and I can tell what my regulator is giving to me . Plus if any thing needs to be replaced shut off valves are all in a small area and easy to get at. Yes I have already had to have water company come and replace 2 regulators in the past 2 yrs . The only way I knew something was wrong by checking the pressure gauges.

    Cost a little more to begin with ,but IMO well worth the money.

    Wish you luck
    Well before I go & talk to the water company, I need to check the pressure regulator valve in my crawlspace which is at the end of the supply line before it branches off. Maybe you missed that in my post. I did say I need to look at my regulator first. After that, I will call them if needed. Thanks.

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