Barn & Storage Buildings- Concrete Floors
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    Scotty370's Avatar
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    Barn & Storage Buildings- Concrete Floors

    I started a new thread in the hopes of helping others.

    What is the consensus of opinion on concrete floor installation? I'm talking Thickness, Rebar vs. Wire, Foam underlay, Sub-base, Geo-Tec fabric, Troweled joints vs Sawed Joints, Etc, Etc, Etc........... Cost saving measures, Foam underlay, and the type used vs. none, Etc. I understand that Geo-Tec on firmly packed ground, with an 8-10" compacted crusher-run stone base, and 8" of rebar reinforced is ideal, but I want to be realistic, from a homeowner standpoint! I'm thinking 6" of stone, over fabric, and a 5" slab with wire and saw-cut would be adequate. KennyD, I looked through your photo site and saw the 'cutting', but am unsure of the base you used. Also, How deep do you score, if sawed. Do you fill the saw-cuts with silicone after the cut, and seal the whole slab with a commercial sealer?

    This will probably be 'Job-One' this Spring, and I want to do it once and right! TIA ~"Scotty"

    Also Perimeter drains, footers under door sills, any help is appreciated..........~S

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    Senior GTT Super Slacker Gizmo2's Avatar
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    Good one Scotty370, as I will be installing a 20'x30' floor this Spring as well.
    My current plan is 5.5 inches thick, 4000lb concrete, wire mesh.
    I am pretty sure the rule on saw cut depth is 1/4 the thickness of the slab.
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    mjncad's Avatar
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    Scotty:

    A lot of how things are done is regional in nature depending on soil types, frost line, etc. However; my choice would be 6" thick with 1/2" rebar on chairs every 24" on center each direction. Sawcut joints are the only way to go, especially if it's a shop type situation where you'll be using creepers and rolling shop stools, and tool cabinets. I cuss our tooled joints every time my shop stool's casters hit one. At the very least make sure there is a vapor barrier under the slab to keep soil moisture from wicking into the concrete. If you can afford insulation, go for it. How you prep the subgrade is going to make all the difference in longevity of the slab.

    Have you ever seen how wire mesh is installed? First it's dropped on the ground, then the concrete is poured, and then Jose and crew in theory pull the mesh up to the center of the slab while they are standing on the mesh.

    If you want to fill the control joints, you can; but I wouldn't use silicone (assuming you mean the stuff for aquariums and the like). Check what the local concrete supply house carries for that purpose.

    I applaud you for wanting to do the slab once and right, as tear and redo later is expensive as hell and a real inconvenience.
    I have more ideas than ambition.


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    Brian's Avatar
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    While we are talking this, I would really like to know the cost of 4" and the difference per foot to 6".



    Brian

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    Scotty370's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    While we are talking this, I would really like to know the cost of 4" and the difference per foot to 6".
    Brian- You make a good point in that if it's only the incremental cost of the 'crete', it's probably not the place to 'cheap-out'! In my structure at 28X40 the difference is about 7 cuyds, (13.83 cuyds, vs 20.74 cuyds). Figure what, $110.00 a yd, on the truck?

    Mjn- I understand the 'bars, and chairs', but think I'm about to face Rebar sticker-shock! I've found this site helpful, http://www.concretenetwork.com/ especially the calculator. Looks like I've got a lot of reading to do! Thanks Guys! ~Scotty

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    Scotty370's Avatar
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    I applaud you for wanting to do the slab once and right, as tear and redo later is expensive as hell and a real inconvenience.
    Well here my deal, I'm in a deep frost area, (except for this year) So I guess the slab will 'float' to some extent. So is the game plan: Packed soil, Geotec. Compacted stone, FoamBoard, Poly, Chairs and rod. and pour? Just trying to learn without my lazy butt doing all that reading! Besides, Someone told me that there's a football game on today.....~Scotty

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    Brian's Avatar
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    Are you pouring a foundation or doing a pole building or?



    Brian

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    Scotty370's Avatar
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    Brian-Here's where I am............

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    Are you pouring a foundation or doing a pole building or?
    http://www.greentractortalk.com/foru...Day-one!/page7

    (Maybe post 62?) ~Scotty

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    Captain Hook Kennyd's Avatar
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    What I know about concrete would fit in a thimble!

    So I read a lot, and asked questions. I wanted the rebar and chairs also but everyone I asked about it locally wanted LOTS more money to do it. So when I had the pole barn built, I just lets them do it how they wanted and where used to-I did specify a vapor barrier and the 2" rigid foam insulation to keep condensation at bay. I think the base has a lot to do with the slab not cracking, like a good amount of well packed stone. Both of the pours for my pole barn have held up perfectly so far. I also agree that saw-cutting control joints is the way to go...I filled some with concrete caulk from Home Depot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty370 View Post
    Mjn- I understand the 'bars, and chairs', but think I'm about to face Rebar sticker-shock! I've found this site helpful, http://www.concretenetwork.com/ especially the calculator. Looks like I've got a lot of reading to do! Thanks Guys! ~Scotty
    Neat web site there, thanks for posting! Yeah, rebar can get pricey. I don't know if there is much difference in cost between the 40,000 PSI and 60,000 PSI rebar. For your purpose, I'd bet 40,000 PSI would be more than adequate.

    Are you going to do your owning forming, etc and let Jose and the boys do the crap work of actually pouring, floating, and finishing the concrete? The more you can do yourself, the more you can save; but there is no way I would do the actual concrete pour and finishing as that is miserable work.
    I have more ideas than ambition.


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