Smoked Briskit...Any Secret Recipes?
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Thread: Smoked Briskit...Any Secret Recipes?

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    2LaneCruzer's Avatar
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    Smoked Briskit...Any Secret Recipes?

    I've cooked a lot on my smokers, but the most difficult has been the whole pork loin (turns out a bit dry) and beef briskit. I've had some very mediocre results, but I have learned a few things. I'm wondering if anyone has any special techniques or secret recipes for Briskit??????

    I will share what I have learned...this is how I have gotten my best results.

    1. Buy the best cut of meat you can get. Prime of course is best, but don't go below Choice.

    2. I take my briskit and coat it in sugar, put it in a turkey baking bag over night. The next day, take it out of the frige, scrape what sugar you can get off and rinse it quickly if you like. I then put on a heavy coat of my BBQ Rubb (recipe in the cook book).

    3. I cook it using the same method as I do my ribs ( 250 degrees, using Mesquite, Pecan and Oak smoking wood) except I use indirect heat. It takes a long time.

    4. I use a digital thermometer, and take it off when it gets to 195-200 degrees.

    This is how I would cook from now on unless there is a better way.
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    I wrap mine after about 6 hours in my cookshack smoker the let it go for 6 more hours at 225. the wrap ho;lds moisture in
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    I usually smoke on my kamado, but results should be similar.

    1. Yep, try to buy prime or choice. Also try to get the whole brisket (packer), flat and point.

    2. I trim all of the hard fat, and try to leave about 1/4 inch of fat remaining. Olive oil and salt, and then add a coffee based rub. (Lanes Ancho Espresso, or Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express). I do this only about 2 hours before smoking.

    3. Get my smoker going to 230/240F, using lump charcoal, and add about 4 chunks of hickory. Set up for indirect. Put a drip pan underneath grill grid, and pour 2 bottles of favorite beer into the pan. Put brisket on grid.

    4a. If I used a prime or choice cut and have time, I just leave the brisket alone until 205F internal temp. Thermometer probe should insert into meat like butter. This could be 12 to... 20 hours. Internal temp is your guide.
    4b. If I'm given the meat and don't know what grade it is, or if it's only the flat cut, or if it's grass fed beef, I check the temp after 5 hours (it should be in the plateau around then). I pull it at 160F. Heavy foil it, and pour 1 can of beef broth inside the foil. Wrap and return to smoker. Remove when 205F internal temp.

    5. If broth was used, carefully pour out the broth from the foil, and rewrap. If no broth/foil was used, wrap in heavy foil. Let sit for at least an hour, wrapped in foil and a couple towels, and place in a room temp cooler (a.k.a faux cambro).

    6. Remove from cooler -- the cambro will keep it hot for about 5 hours. Remove point from flat (there is a fat line separating the two), and slice against the grain -- pencil thin. Note that the point and flat have a different grain direction. When it comes to the point, you can also remove it before the cambro step, cube and sauce it up, and return it to the smoker for another hour or so. Makes great burnt ends.

    7. Serve.
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    Thanks everyone. The drip pan/beer technique sounds interesting, and I never thought of adding broth to the foil wrap. I am going to try that on a pork loin that I have frozen and have been shy about cooking because the last one turned out so dry.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2LaneCruzer View Post
    Thanks everyone. The drip pan/beer technique sounds interesting, and I never thought of adding broth to the foil wrap. I am going to try that on a pork loin that I have frozen and have been shy about cooking because the last one turned out so dry.
    Cook your pork loin only to around 145 - 150 degrees! Foil it and let it rest for half hr. FDA says that temp is good. I even had to look it up when I heard that, but from what I remember, it is true.

    I just did a search on FDA website, here is a quote: Cook beef, pork, veal, and lamb roasts, steaks, and chops to at least 145° F (63° C), with a 3 minute rest time.

    Your loins will not turn out dry if you pull off at this temp, I have done this many times. Good Luck and report back with your results!
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    Tester

    I'll volunteer to test out y'all brisket. Just in the interest of being helpful, you know. Let me know when it's on the grill and get me in the neighborhood. I can find it by sniffing the wind, lol.

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