Converting an old 4x2 Gator to electric...
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    Converting an old 4x2 Gator to electric...

    I'm trying to convert an old gas 4x2 gator to electric drive.
    I'm debating how to connect the motor to the transmission. I could do it any one of 3 ways:

    1. Remove the secondary clutch and use a chain drive to connect the motor and trans shafts.
    2. Keep the secondary clutch and drive the cogged belt with the motor.
    3. Keep the secondary clutch and drive the cogged belt with the old primary clutch to the motor.

    Any thoughts on the best way?

    Thanks!

    Bill

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    Senior GTT Super Slacker Gizmo2's Avatar
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    Welcome to GTT bferster.
    I can't help with your question but if I may ask, why would you want to? For use in a mobile home RV park?
    Keith

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmo2 View Post
    Welcome to GTT bferster.
    I can't help with your question but if I may ask, why would you want to? For use in a mobile home RV park?
    The gas motor died, and it seemed like an interesting project to do..

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    56FordGuy's Avatar
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    I'm excited about your project. I love old 4x2 Gators, and happen to work on a lot of industrial electric vehicles. JD made an electric version of the Gator for a while as well as gas.

    What voltage/ motor/ controller are you going with? Where are you putting the batteries?

    Unlike a gas engine, when you come to a stop with an electric motor the motor doesn't continue to turn. However, I wouldn't go to a cogged belt or chain drive. If you get under a hard enough load, the motor will stall and blow a fuse. I would rather have the belt slip than blow a fuse or burn up a component. I don't know what kind of fabrication setup you have, but I might be inclined to keep the Deere drive belt and clutches and adapt the drive end to your motor, just so there are fewer things you have to try and change over.

    Please keep us updated and post some pictures, I'm pretty excited about this.
    -Blake

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    Quote Originally Posted by 56FordGuy View Post
    I'm excited about your project. I love old 4x2 Gators, and happen to work on a lot of industrial electric vehicles. JD made an electric version of the Gator for a while as well as gas.

    What voltage/ motor/ controller are you going with? Where are you putting the batteries?

    Unlike a gas engine, when you come to a stop with an electric motor the motor doesn't continue to turn. However, I wouldn't go to a cogged belt or chain drive. If you get under a hard enough load, the motor will stall and blow a fuse. I would rather have the belt slip than blow a fuse or burn up a component. I don't know what kind of fabrication setup you have, but I might be inclined to keep the Deere drive belt and clutches and adapt the drive end to your motor, just so there are fewer things you have to try and change over.

    Please keep us updated and post some pictures, I'm pretty excited about this.
    I'm using a 24V Ramsey winch motor (2300 RPM, 4HP)
    conrolled by an Alltrax SMP-48225 225A PWM controller,
    and 4 sealed lead acid batteries (12AH/12V), although I may need to add more for range later on

    Here's a link to a Flickr site I'm using to document the project:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bferst...7645408986978/

    If I pull off the primary clutch from the gas motor, will it be easy to attach the clutch assembly to the 3/4" shaft of the electric motor?

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    You would probably need to use a bushing on the shaft as I think the gas engine probably had a 1" crankshaft
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saskman49 View Post
    You would probably need to use a bushing on the shaft as I think the gas engine probably had a 1" crankshaft
    People on the forums talk about the fact that the clutch has a tapered shaft. If that the 1" one?

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    56FordGuy's Avatar
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    I thought I replied to this yesterday, but I guess not.

    I've never had the clutch off the Gator, so I don't know what the crankshaft is. If you have your old engine, pull the clutch off and see. I believe it will be larger than your 3/4 electric motor shaft and will require having some form of bushing made. If you have access to a lathe it should be fairly simple. If your winch motor uses a key to drive the load you would need to broach a keyway into your adapter.

    Your motor is 4hp, the factory engine was 10. The electric motor may need more reduction to have enough torque to move the machine, especially under load. The factory clutch mechanism may not be able to provide that.
    Last edited by 56FordGuy; 07-22-2014 at 09:18 PM.
    -Blake

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    Is there an adjustment for the engaging RPM. My gator has to get such a high RPM to engage it that it's like popping the clutch to do a burnout. Mine is the 2007 TX

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    56FordGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmo View Post
    Is there an adjustment for the engaging RPM. My gator has to get such a high RPM to engage it that it's like popping the clutch to do a burnout. Mine is the 2007 TX
    This is from the service manual for the 4X2, the TX is the next generation so things might have changed.


    • Clutch should slowly start to engage and move drive belt between 1350 - 1600 rpm. Drive belt should be riding high in primary clutch and low in secondary clutch (C).
    • If clutch has harsh engagement, erratic transition, hesitation, or clutch noise (chirping); perform primary clutch lubrication. Check primary clutch for cam weights binding, pivot pins worn, flat spots on rollers or rollers sticking, and no groove in sheave. Repair or replace primary clutch.
    • If engine is surging; check engine and governor performance.
    • Smooth engagement and transition (up-shift), primary clutch is good. Go to Drive Train Performance Tests; secondary clutch down-shifting check.
    -Blake

    Your mileage may vary.

    JD 6410
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