Warm up time on newer machines
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    Corkpuller's Avatar
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    Warm up time on newer machines

    This new emissions stuff is something I'm not familiar with. The DPF and the regen process.
    From what I understand you need to operate at higher R's to prevent all the bells, buzzers and flashing lights from tellin you to stop and go through the regen process.

    I warm up every engine on everything I've ever owned, tractors, trucks, cars, motorcycles, boats, and more.

    Are these machines equipped with the DPF system allowed to warm up as tractors without the system?
    They say idling is NOT good for the newer machines.

    What's the warm up process? Or is that something of the past?
    Fire it up and go straight to 2200 R's or whatever the minimum requirement is, and warm the engine from there?

    Thanks

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    ddinham's Avatar
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    I don't do anything different now than I did when it was warm. I do go a little slow initially and keep the RPM's a little low. I just made a run down the road to my neighbors place and kept the speed down to around 10 MPH. Not very far and it was throwing out heat already.

    Dave
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    I follow what the manual says for starting my 2032R. Start at a low idle and increase throttle to 1/2 after you verify you have oil pressure. Let it run like that for one minute then go about your business. The higher idle must be to ensure sufficient oil pressure and flow to the engine.

    After that I try to keep loads light until the temp gauge moves off the peg but that is the normal progression of things. Like I need to hook up and attachment or drive somewhere before the real heavy work begins so the tractor naturally has a bit of time to warm up by means of gentle activity.
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    jgayman's Avatar
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    As tonybcrazy stated, simply use the warm-up procedure that is listed in the manual. They have a cold-start and warm-start process. Also remember, diesel engines develop the most heat when they are worked HARD. Just sitting idling, or sitting running at half-throttle does not build much engine heat.

    I just changed oil in my 2720 and wanted to get the engine warmed up. I let it sit and run at half-throttle for 15-minutes while I gathered up my tools and the engine still wasn't very warm. The oil filter was only slightly warm and the oil was only luke warm. The lower radiator hose was still cold.

    These engines need to WORK to develop heat.


    glc, kevin37b, Herminator and 1 others like this.
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    Corkpuller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgayman View Post
    As tonybcrazy stated, simply use the warm-up procedure that is listed in the manual.


    I don't have a manual, or a tractor. But. What tony said answered my question. Which is kinda what I thought, and also different than just crankin the engine and walking away for a couple minutes.

    Confirm oil pressure, then get the R's up. Rather than, just let idle til warm.

    Thanks
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    Ruger.45's Avatar
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    I usually start mine up, let it idle for a bit and up the r’s to warm up for a minute or so. I don’t rev it up to 1/2 throttle, probably around 1300 rpm or so. Then I take it easy for a couple minutes of operation before going full operation
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corkpuller View Post
    They say idling is NOT good for the newer machines.
    That needs to be kept in context. For as long as I can remember the standard for anything with a diesel engine was "better to let it idle than to shut to shut it down". Long haul truckers used to let their rigs idle while they slept for 6 hours. The only time they shut them down was while they were putting fuel in them.

    That sort of idling is a no-no for newer machines. The 5-minute warm up isn't the big concern. It's the long term idling that creates problems with the DPF systems.
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    Start the machine , get op and throttle up to 2000 , and get the juices moving . Kevin

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimR View Post
    That needs to be kept in context. For as long as I can remember the standard for anything with a diesel engine was "better to let it idle than to shut to shut it down". Long haul truckers used to let their rigs idle while they slept for 6 hours. The only time they shut them down was while they were putting fuel in them.

    That sort of idling is a no-no for newer machines. The 5-minute warm up isn't the big concern. It's the long term idling that creates problems with the DPF systems.

    That is not true for all older diesels. Here is what is in the manual of my 44 year old Case 1070.


    IMPORTANT: NEVER IDLE THE ENGINE FOR PROLONGED PERIODS OF TIME! DURING THE EXTREMELY COLD WEATHER, WATCH THE COOLANT TEMPERATURE CAREFULLY AND NEVER OPERATE THE ENGINE FOR PROLONGED PERIODS BELOW THE RECOMMENDED COOLANT TEMPERATURE.

    During extreme cold temperature, the engine will not warm up to or maintain the operating temperature at low engine speed. Low idling speeds, during extremely cold temperatures will result in incomplete combustion, heavy deposit formations on the valves and possible serious damage to the engine.

    Tractor must be run with throttle hand lever 2/3 open (approximately 1500 RPM) for approximately 5 minutes to bring the transmission fluid within operating temperature.

    MAINTAINING ENGINE OPERATING TEMPERATURE

    When the engine is not operating under load, but the operator wishes to keep the engine running due to the extremely cold temperatures
    Keep the throttle hand lever 2/3 open (approximately 1500 RPM)
    DO NOT IDLE THE ENGINE
    John

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    When I start my 4066R on a cold day, the engine rattles. I keep the throttle at the lowest setting until the rattling goes away.
    4066R open station

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