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  1. Top | #21
    etcallhome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SulleyBear View Post
    Chains will chew the crap out of the blacktop finish. You won't need chains if you properly ballast. I have never had chains on my tractor and our roads have a 9 degree grade....you might still want the spacers for stability. Personally, I think you should try the Terra Grips first. You will be shocked at the damage to the asphalt surface regular chains will do and if someone says "Well, then don't spin the tires", they obviously haven't plowed much snow.....sometimes, it can't be avoided.

    I am going to bet you add power angling after a few times plowing........It's so much faster and safer to be able to put the snow where it's best. Looking at the video, the snow should be on one side of the road and then the other and you have to REALLY be careful about knowing exactly where the drop off edge is or you will have a very unpleasant ride, possibly a rollover.

    With the drop off along side your roads, you have to push the snow completely off the road or its going to be down to one lane in a hurry......

    Let me also tell you that plowing the roads is painfully slow on the tractor. I know, you have time and will enjoy the seat time, but it becomes a matter of practicality. If I were you and knowing what I know about plowing snow with these machines, I wouldn't committ to plowing the road and driveways until you have done it. Its going to take longer than you think..........much longer......

    I have my plowing route down to a science, every single move is carefully planned for maximum efficiency. I plow about 1,200 feet of roads and our roads are 36 feet wide and my plow is 87" wide and along with the 22 driveways I plow, it takes me at least 3 hours. 3 Hours per plow outing is a LOT of time in the seat when its below freezing. I usually start between 2:30am and 3:30am, depending upon the snowfall and day of the week.
    Had to disagree with you ,,CHAINS DO NOT chew the crap out of your asphalt... THE nut setting on the tractor seat chews the crap out of your asphalt.

    Yes proper ballast is a major help.

    When a tire starts to spin that tells you ,, you are either taking to large a bit of snow or ice. Stop back up Get out of H put the tractor in L and go easy on speed and the amount of material you are pushing.

    I've cleaned our church asphalt parking lot for the close to 40 yrs. using a MF 1655 then our jd425 and for past 18 yrs JD sub compacts.
    You can find maybe 2 places where I've left the tires spin more than a 1/2 rotation. Over those years of plowing snow, I've plowed as little as 1-2" to over 36" of snow.

    Your best friend is your speed , slow down, and take your time. Flying in H to push snow is the worse thing you can do.

    I've plowed , asphalt, concrete and dirt driveways, the same on any of those driveways slow down and take your time.
    Gene

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    JD 1025R, H120 FEL 54" bucket, 54" mmm Auto Conn, 54" Front blade, JD back hoe ,JD IMatch, 48" Bush Hog tiller, Middlebuster from MF dealer, used King Kutter 5' rear blade, a new 47" JD Front blower and Original Tractor cab w/heater.
    We have a Red Honda Pioneer 700-4 (4 seater) w/soft top , doors, and winch.

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  3. Top | #22
    SulleyBear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeymjustice View Post
    I have a few concerns about spreading snow melt, my first consideration was buying the broadcast spreader and using the salt as my desired ballast but I've heard a lot of negativity about spreading salt with the tractor. I'm very OCD and I would pressure wash immediately after each use but I still don't want to induce any preventable damage to my machine. I would like to here what you think about that. I also have the option of using a boom sprayer and spraying brine.


    I did look up the terragrips you suggested. I was going to take some time to research them more to understand how they work and how they compare to chains.
    There have been a number of issues and questions raised about plowing with these 1 series tractors, etc. I wanted to take the time to address the major points which I feel you need to consider and be aware of for plowing. Experience is a great teacher on this topic. Most of us have opinions about plowing or blowing snow. Some have more experience than others. Here are my opinions, suggestions and answers to the common topics and issues which come up regarding plowing.

    I do give you credit for planning for the snow now. Many wait until November and then they rush and make decisions under time constraints. You are taking your time and thinking this through. Hopefully, my insight will help answer questions and prepare you for your snow plowing adventures this winter. Just FYI, I had dozens of people tell me I would NEVER be able to plow with my custom made plow and it simply wouldn't work.......That was probably 4,000 driveway plowings ago........

    A summary of my Plowing Activities and Experience
    Just to make my personal experience of snow plowing and the use of the equipment clear, I want to share with you details about my plowing. I have been plowing with Garden Tractors or SCUTS for 35 years plus. For the last several years, I have plowed an average of 24 driveways in my neighborhood and this past winter, I had 32 plowing "events" (when plowing was required with 3" of new snow or more NOT counting drifting) and the season of 2017 to 2018, I plowed 45 times. That's the equivalent of nearly 1,000 driveways a season.

    I have a lot of experience using these machines on residential driveways and private HOA roads. I point this out as I have spent a great deal of time to refine my plowing and make it as efficient as possible. I am able to plow the 26 driveways and between 900 and 1,500 feet of private roads 35' wide in about 3.5 hours when the snowfall is 6" or less. When the snow is deeper, it adds about 20 minutes per additional inch of snow.

    I usually start plowing at about 2:30 am to 3 am as I have neighbors who start leaving for work or school at about 5am. I want to always make sure their driveways are clear before the need to leave. The neighbors pay for the plowing, with the exception of one with cancer who I don't charge and another who is a very close friend, who I don't charge.

    The roads are paid by the hour plowing and I spend 1 hour (or less) plowing roads typically. I have it down where with snowfalls under 6", I can plow 8 to 10 driveways an hour as most are next to one another and the driving distance between them is minimal. The quickest driveway is about 3 minutes to plow with a pass up, back drag from the doors a pass back and clean the end at the road with one push sideways.

    The fastest driveways to plow are straight or relatively straight. The slowest are circular drives and those with a lot of pavement in front of the house.

    Terragrips
    Go to the Amazon website and read the reviews for the Terra Grips which are 26 x 12 x 12 and there is a very detailed and thorough analysis written by someone who obviously has used them both extensively. It will answer just about any question you could have.

    Salt Spreader / Snow Melt Use and Application
    I would avoid the salt spreader on your tractor AT ALL COSTS. If you have ever used the 3 point spreader, it even throws material forward sometimes and the machine will be covered with salt. There is simply no way not to have tracked the snow melt onto the machine and it will be everywhere.

    One thing about using the right type of snow melt is that you really need very little of it to accomplish the task. The typical driveway with a steep grade where I use it, I use probably less than 10 pounds for the entire driveway of 125' or so. Driving on the driveway also tracks the snow melt and spreads it for you.

    I would also avoid rock salt at all costs. You will likely want to go with a blend product. I always buy one which is not harmful for our dog's feet as many neighbors who I plow for also have dogs and they don't want their K9 kids to get burned feet. It costs more but when I explain it to the owners, they all agree to pay more for it and no one has ever hedged.

    Snow melts are something which is a personal preference and it depends what is available in your area. You need to be very careful if anyone has decorative concrete or painted color finish or other "fancy" surfaces.

    You can spray brine if that works for your application. It also has its limitations.

    The other option is that you can spread just where needed and do it by hand with a a variety of devices. I bought a commercial carry spreader which you wear over your shoulder in a sling and crank it. It works very well and you can control the width and volume of material being spread. Read this thread if you are interested.

    https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/tools-equipment/179246-solo-hand-crank-shoulder-carry-spreader.html

    Eliminate the Metal Wear Surfaces from making contact with the Pavement, all of them.

    Probably the most important part of needing as little snow melt as possible is to use the rubber edge on your plow. It will clean the pavement much, much better than the other plow wear surfaces. In fact, I would also take off your plow shoes, or raise them so they don't touch the pavement and only are used to stabilize the plow when you take it off, which won't be often. The shoes will also mar the pavement, extensively. Do yourself and your neighbors a favor and eliminate any metal from pavement contact.......you don't need the metal and a rubber edge will do a much nicer job.



    Tractors vrs Trucks for Plowing Snow
    There is no better residential driveway clearing machine in the hands of an experienced operator than a SCUT tractor. The guys who plow the few drives which I don't in the neighborhood have all commented about how much faster I can clear a drive than they can with a large, cumbersome pick up truck. They also tend to lose the work to me because I can and do a much better job plowing the tight areas and details and not causing any damage. The pickup's can't come close to getting into tight areas, they are very limited on where they can pile the snow because of the length of their truck and they can only back drag much of the areas around buildings, which packs down the snow and then freezes to ice after being in the sun.

    While pickup trucks have the advantage for speed on plowing areas such as regular roads or large parking lots, they are woefully inadequate to my 1 series with a 7 foot blade on it for plowing typical residential driveways.

    Trucks can't push onto lawn areas without tearing the lawn up and with the tractor set up correctly and with a good operator, you can pile snow all day long and not harm a blade of grass. The plow visibility on a tractor is unobstructed. You can look down and see the corners and exactly where the front edge of the plow is located. Not at all the case with a truck.

    In fact, I drop the plow up against the overhead doors for the driveways I plow (a total of over 70 garage doors each time I plow...) and I am able to get the plow within 4" of the door on average, usually I am inside of the actual door frame. I have never hit a door and it saves time clearing the snow as you can keep the doors cleared so its easy to get in and out and so the doors don't freeze down, etc.

    Number one issue which causes residents to switch from trucks plowing their drives to me is the clearing of the overhead doors. People don't like having to shovel in front of their garage doors AND pay someone who is plowing their drives. Most plow truck operators don't want to get out of the cab and shovel away from the doors and entranceways. It leads to a big "bump" of snow and ice as the vehicles drive over it. Pretty soon it starts to freeze and thaw and then it freezes the door down. Then is breaks door springs and results in a $400 garage door service call......People paying attention to these details can avoid the problems and the best way is to keep the door area cleared of all snow and ice........

    The roads you have are very narrow and windy and a truck will have a slight advantage in speed over the tractor on the roads, but it also is going to be limited in tight areas. With your tractor, you can turn around in the road, despite its narrow size. No way with a pick up. They will have to either use driveways to turn around or push to the end and turn around and go back out.

    With a tractor, you can safely push the snow banks back at a 90 degree angle to the road and maintain the maximum cleared width. The truck is going to build roadside snow banks and in heavy snow winters, you could easily get down to one lane on your roads, requiring moving the banks back with a FEL. The tractor will excel at doing this safely.

    The 2 miles of length make the speed advantage go to the truck, but those roads are going to have to be plowed pretty slowly due to the curves, rolling hills and other terrain. If your typical truck with a plow is plowing the roads and you already have snow banks from other snow fall, if the plow truck meets a vehicle either coming into or leaving the neighborhood, that is going to be interesting as narrow as it is. Someone is going to be backing to a driveway or fork in the road to allow the 9' or 10' blade on the truck to pass.......

    Rear Ballast, Extremely Important for plowing Success
    Ballast is most important for plowing. Plan on a system of flexible ballast where you can add or remove ballast as needed. Perhaps suitcase weights, sand bags, snow melt bags, it all depends upon what system you end up using. Using the snow melt bags means you have the material you need with you. I have a rear 3 point carry all which I built that I carry the ballast on, as well as shovel, walk behind snow blower, etc. That way there is everything you need with you and it doesn't stick way out from the rear of the machine. Plus the carry all has a lot of other uses in other seasons.

    Here is a thread on my rear carry all when it was built. It has evolved since that time with use....

    3 Point Carry All for my 1025R

    Tire type makes a difference for traction. I will tell you the newer the asphalt, the worse the traction for plowing snow. When someone talks about how they don't have any traction troubles on a surface, the condition of the surface and its material type make a HUGE difference. Basically, the nicer the asphalt looks, the harder it is to obtain and maintain traction. Also, crack filler is very slippery, much more so than new asphalt, but your roads are some time away from crack filler from what I could see.

    Snow Plow verses Snow Blower for your use
    Personally, I prefer to plow snow verses using my front mounted snow blower. Without a cab, there is no comparison to the experience. A blower will cover you with snow at some point, if not most of the time.

    Plowing is faster, wider (with my set up and yours) and the rubber scraper edge leaves the pavement clean, where the snow blower will pack down snow and it becomes an ice pack over time. Clean, clear surface can be achieved every time with the plow with a rubber edge, not so with a blower. The blower does have an advantage in that it doesn't create snow banks along the road, but when plowing, you can easily accommodate that with planning where you push snow, etc.

    I keep a blower for extreme conditions and the better the machine operator you become with your tractor, the more extreme the snowfall required to switch from the plow to the blower. In fact, I haven't used my snow blower for at least two winters now and we have had about 160" of snow during the entire season.

    Visibility while plowing is very, very important. Snow blowers create a lot of blowing snow and make it hard for the operator to see at all times and the snow also obstructs the view of the tractor and operator from other traffic on the roads. Whether you are plowing or blowing, make sure to add flashing and revolving lights so others can see you regardless of the conditions. This is really important because much of the snow clearing takes place in the dark hours before and after work.



    So, in summary, key points are;

    First and foremost, a hydraulically angling plow will likely cut your plow time in half, for every drive you plow. Since time is already precious, spend the money and add this before winter. You won't regret it, I guarantee you.


    1. A flexible rear ballast system with capacity ranges of 250 pounds to 800 pounds.

    2. A rubber scraper edge on your plow to reduce damage to the road surface and lawns, etc,

    3. Tires and traction, whether it's siping the tires, going to HDAP's or whatever.

    4. Avoid having metal make contact with the surface, whether it's the plow edge, tire chains, etc. as you will end up marring the surface over time.

    5. Use snow melt very sparingly. It doesn't take as much as most people apply unless you are applying to sheet ice like in an ice storm. Then, you gotta do what you gotta do. One ice storm we had this winter, I used as much snow melt during the ONE ice storm as I did the ENTIRE winter for normal use. I used 650 pounds of snow melt in the one storm, but that's what it took to make the conditions safe for me to operate and for others to get up and down their driveways.



    1025R with Mauser Cab
    (10/2017)/ 120R FEL / RC2048 Mower / All of Ken's Bolt on Products / 60" HD Front Broom / 3 pt 45 Gallon Boom less Sprayer / CA2068 Core Aerator / I-Match / 54" Snow Plow w/ angling Quick Attach / Frontier 3 Pt Sprayer / Pallet Forks / 8 -42# Weights

    John Deere 455 (New in 9/1996) / MC519 Cart /60" MMM /47" Snow Thrower / 7'3" snow plow / Quick Hitch /
    4 -42# Weights / JD#10 Cart

    ExMark Lazer Z w/60" Deck , Billy Goat Blower , Full Stable of Echo Products





  4. Top | #23
    sennister's Avatar
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    I agree with what Sully said. A couple more points.

    The one advantage missed for using a truck vs a tractor is when you are plowing a few customers in one area then have a 10 mile trip to the next group of customers. There is no dealing with trailers or loading and unloading. That is mainly why they use them over a tractor. If everything you are plowing is within a reasonable drive of where you live on the tractor and there is no law or other restriction to driving there, then a tractor will do a better job hands down.

    I also don't use a blower unless there is absolutely no other option. Where I live it is wooded like the OP so while we can get some drifting, it normally isn't an issue. I have a coworker that lives on a 6 acre lot surrounded by farm fields around his driveway. He can plow but even with a snow fence he is going to have to plow once to twice a day because of drifting. It doesn't matter if it snowed or not. In that case I get why he blows. He doesn't have to worry about the other thing I don't like about blowing. Liability. There are some driveway designs, building placements and weather conditions that can make it very difficult to blow without additional liability or getting frozen. Like he mentioned you will be covered with snow at some point unless you have a cab. Also there is no telling what someone leaves in the snow. I remember one winter a few years ago when we were going to get a good 16" or so of snow. I didn't go out and plow for some reason mid storm and had the blower on. Well the kids had been out the night before playing in the new snow as it was falling. I go out in the morning once it was done and start to blow snow. I am going down the driveway and all of a sudden the tractor makes a horrendous noise and shakes. I can see something big go flying out the chute. I shut it down to go inspect the damage. The tractor was fine. The shovel the kids left the in driveway which was covered in close to a foot of snow the night before not so much. The blade part of the shovel was plastic and that exploded sending shards of plastic all over the yard. The handle was aluminum. The blower sucked it up wrapped it around the auger and sent it flying about 20'. It was now shaped more like a corkscrew. With plowing it would have just gotten pushed out along side the driveway and possibly recovered without getting broken. This was just a shovel but stuff gets buried in snow and when you are clearing someone else's driveway, there is no telling what they or their kids will leave around the yard. Plus there it a added liability to flying objects breaking a window or damaging siding. Granted it doesn't make any sense to blow snow directly at a building but in some cases there is only so much I can do to direct it away unless I get out and shovel. In my case I deal with the risk on my property. If I am clearing someone else, well none of them pay me so I get as close as I am comfortable with and leave the rest to them.
    etcallhome, timzr and joeymjustice like this.


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  6. Top | #24
    jdforever's Avatar
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    I'm with Sulley on this one. I don't use chains either, but I also don't deal with 10" plus snows. I put 2" spacers on the rear of my 1025R and grooved my tires. The spacers add a tremendous amount of stability, especially because of the cab, while the grooves in the tires greatly improve traction. Proper ballast also plays a big part in traction. Depending on the amount and weight of the snow, I will use between 400lb and 600lb of 3 point ballast.

    The width of spacers that your tractor can accommodate is dependent on the width of your mmm, if you have one. There are a number of threads regarding that subject.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20190204_162355.jpg  
    Greg

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  7. Top | #25

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    Did I miss where you listed what tires you have on your tractor? Turf tires are just fine for snow in fact they give you better traction then any type of non sipped bar tires. Contact patch and enough weight is where it’s at. If I were you the first thing I’d do is get a rubber or plastic plow edge. Steel edges raise hell if you don’t use plow shoes. From there I would only worry about having enough ballast.

    You should wait and see how the tractor performs before changing tires or adding chains. If a heavy wet snow is forecast go out 1/2 way through the storm and plow the slushy stuff. That will make a huge difference if you get 10” total. The bottom 3-4 inches would be the hardest to move.

    Do you live in a major snow area? Your tractor is a very capable snow removal machine, give yourself some time to acquire some experience before buying stuff you may never use.
    jdforever and joeymjustice like this.
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  8. Top | #26
    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SulleyBear View Post
    There have been a number of issues and questions raised about plowing with these 1 series tractors, etc. I wanted to take the time to address the major points which I feel you need to consider and be aware of for plowing. Experience is a great teacher on this topic. Most of us have opinions about plowing or blowing snow. Some have more experience than others. Here are my opinions, suggestions and answers to the common topics and issues which come up regarding plowing.

    I do give you credit for planning for the snow now. Many wait until November and then they rush and make decisions under time constraints. You are taking your time and thinking this through. Hopefully, my insight will help answer questions and prepare you for your snow plowing adventures this winter. Just FYI, I had dozens of people tell me I would NEVER be able to plow with my custom made plow and it simply wouldn't work.......That was probably 4,000 driveway plowings ago........

    A summary of my Plowing Activities and Experience
    Just to make my personal experience of snow plowing and the use of the equipment clear, I want to share with you details about my plowing. I have been plowing with Garden Tractors or SCUTS for 35 years plus. For the last several years, I have plowed an average of 24 driveways in my neighborhood and this past winter, I had 32 plowing "events" (when plowing was required with 3" of new snow or more NOT counting drifting) and the season of 2017 to 2018, I plowed 45 times. That's the equivalent of nearly 1,000 driveways a season.

    I have a lot of experience using these machines on residential driveways and private HOA roads. I point this out as I have spent a great deal of time to refine my plowing and make it as efficient as possible. I am able to plow the 26 driveways and between 900 and 1,500 feet of private roads 35' wide in about 3.5 hours when the snowfall is 6" or less. When the snow is deeper, it adds about 20 minutes per additional inch of snow.

    I usually start plowing at about 2:30 am to 3 am as I have neighbors who start leaving for work or school at about 5am. I want to always make sure their driveways are clear before the need to leave. The neighbors pay for the plowing, with the exception of one with cancer who I don't charge and another who is a very close friend, who I don't charge.

    The roads are paid by the hour plowing and I spend 1 hour (or less) plowing roads typically. I have it down where with snowfalls under 6", I can plow 8 to 10 driveways an hour as most are next to one another and the driving distance between them is minimal. The quickest driveway is about 3 minutes to plow with a pass up, back drag from the doors a pass back and clean the end at the road with one push sideways.

    The fastest driveways to plow are straight or relatively straight. The slowest are circular drives and those with a lot of pavement in front of the house.

    Terragrips
    Go to the Amazon website and read the reviews for the Terra Grips which are 26 x 12 x 12 and there is a very detailed and thorough analysis written by someone who obviously has used them both extensively. It will answer just about any question you could have.

    Salt Spreader / Snow Melt Use and Application
    I would avoid the salt spreader on your tractor AT ALL COSTS. If you have ever used the 3 point spreader, it even throws material forward sometimes and the machine will be covered with salt. There is simply no way not to have tracked the snow melt onto the machine and it will be everywhere.

    One thing about using the right type of snow melt is that you really need very little of it to accomplish the task. The typical driveway with a steep grade where I use it, I use probably less than 10 pounds for the entire driveway of 125' or so. Driving on the driveway also tracks the snow melt and spreads it for you.

    I would also avoid rock salt at all costs. You will likely want to go with a blend product. I always buy one which is not harmful for our dog's feet as many neighbors who I plow for also have dogs and they don't want their K9 kids to get burned feet. It costs more but when I explain it to the owners, they all agree to pay more for it and no one has ever hedged.

    Snow melts are something which is a personal preference and it depends what is available in your area. You need to be very careful if anyone has decorative concrete or painted color finish or other "fancy" surfaces.

    You can spray brine if that works for your application. It also has its limitations.

    The other option is that you can spread just where needed and do it by hand with a a variety of devices. I bought a commercial carry spreader which you wear over your shoulder in a sling and crank it. It works very well and you can control the width and volume of material being spread. Read this thread if you are interested.

    https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/tools-equipment/179246-solo-hand-crank-shoulder-carry-spreader.html

    Eliminate the Metal Wear Surfaces from making contact with the Pavement, all of them.

    Probably the most important part of needing as little snow melt as possible is to use the rubber edge on your plow. It will clean the pavement much, much better than the other plow wear surfaces. In fact, I would also take off your plow shoes, or raise them so they don't touch the pavement and only are used to stabilize the plow when you take it off, which won't be often. The shoes will also mar the pavement, extensively. Do yourself and your neighbors a favor and eliminate any metal from pavement contact.......you don't need the metal and a rubber edge will do a much nicer job.



    Tractors vrs Trucks for Plowing Snow
    There is no better residential driveway clearing machine in the hands of an experienced operator than a SCUT tractor. The guys who plow the few drives which I don't in the neighborhood have all commented about how much faster I can clear a drive than they can with a large, cumbersome pick up truck. They also tend to lose the work to me because I can and do a much better job plowing the tight areas and details and not causing any damage. The pickup's can't come close to getting into tight areas, they are very limited on where they can pile the snow because of the length of their truck and they can only back drag much of the areas around buildings, which packs down the snow and then freezes to ice after being in the sun.

    While pickup trucks have the advantage for speed on plowing areas such as regular roads or large parking lots, they are woefully inadequate to my 1 series with a 7 foot blade on it for plowing typical residential driveways.

    Trucks can't push onto lawn areas without tearing the lawn up and with the tractor set up correctly and with a good operator, you can pile snow all day long and not harm a blade of grass. The plow visibility on a tractor is unobstructed. You can look down and see the corners and exactly where the front edge of the plow is located. Not at all the case with a truck.

    In fact, I drop the plow up against the overhead doors for the driveways I plow (a total of over 70 garage doors each time I plow...) and I am able to get the plow within 4" of the door on average, usually I am inside of the actual door frame. I have never hit a door and it saves time clearing the snow as you can keep the doors cleared so its easy to get in and out and so the doors don't freeze down, etc.

    Number one issue which causes residents to switch from trucks plowing their drives to me is the clearing of the overhead doors. People don't like having to shovel in front of their garage doors AND pay someone who is plowing their drives. Most plow truck operators don't want to get out of the cab and shovel away from the doors and entranceways. It leads to a big "bump" of snow and ice as the vehicles drive over it. Pretty soon it starts to freeze and thaw and then it freezes the door down. Then is breaks door springs and results in a $400 garage door service call......People paying attention to these details can avoid the problems and the best way is to keep the door area cleared of all snow and ice........

    The roads you have are very narrow and windy and a truck will have a slight advantage in speed over the tractor on the roads, but it also is going to be limited in tight areas. With your tractor, you can turn around in the road, despite its narrow size. No way with a pick up. They will have to either use driveways to turn around or push to the end and turn around and go back out.

    With a tractor, you can safely push the snow banks back at a 90 degree angle to the road and maintain the maximum cleared width. The truck is going to build roadside snow banks and in heavy snow winters, you could easily get down to one lane on your roads, requiring moving the banks back with a FEL. The tractor will excel at doing this safely.

    The 2 miles of length make the speed advantage go to the truck, but those roads are going to have to be plowed pretty slowly due to the curves, rolling hills and other terrain. If your typical truck with a plow is plowing the roads and you already have snow banks from other snow fall, if the plow truck meets a vehicle either coming into or leaving the neighborhood, that is going to be interesting as narrow as it is. Someone is going to be backing to a driveway or fork in the road to allow the 9' or 10' blade on the truck to pass.......

    Rear Ballast, Extremely Important for plowing Success
    Ballast is most important for plowing. Plan on a system of flexible ballast where you can add or remove ballast as needed. Perhaps suitcase weights, sand bags, snow melt bags, it all depends upon what system you end up using. Using the snow melt bags means you have the material you need with you. I have a rear 3 point carry all which I built that I carry the ballast on, as well as shovel, walk behind snow blower, etc. That way there is everything you need with you and it doesn't stick way out from the rear of the machine. Plus the carry all has a lot of other uses in other seasons.

    Here is a thread on my rear carry all when it was built. It has evolved since that time with use....

    3 Point Carry All for my 1025R

    Tire type makes a difference for traction. I will tell you the newer the asphalt, the worse the traction for plowing snow. When someone talks about how they don't have any traction troubles on a surface, the condition of the surface and its material type make a HUGE difference. Basically, the nicer the asphalt looks, the harder it is to obtain and maintain traction. Also, crack filler is very slippery, much more so than new asphalt, but your roads are some time away from crack filler from what I could see.

    Snow Plow verses Snow Blower for your use
    Personally, I prefer to plow snow verses using my front mounted snow blower. Without a cab, there is no comparison to the experience. A blower will cover you with snow at some point, if not most of the time.

    Plowing is faster, wider (with my set up and yours) and the rubber scraper edge leaves the pavement clean, where the snow blower will pack down snow and it becomes an ice pack over time. Clean, clear surface can be achieved every time with the plow with a rubber edge, not so with a blower. The blower does have an advantage in that it doesn't create snow banks along the road, but when plowing, you can easily accommodate that with planning where you push snow, etc.

    I keep a blower for extreme conditions and the better the machine operator you become with your tractor, the more extreme the snowfall required to switch from the plow to the blower. In fact, I haven't used my snow blower for at least two winters now and we have had about 160" of snow during the entire season.

    Visibility while plowing is very, very important. Snow blowers create a lot of blowing snow and make it hard for the operator to see at all times and the snow also obstructs the view of the tractor and operator from other traffic on the roads. Whether you are plowing or blowing, make sure to add flashing and revolving lights so others can see you regardless of the conditions. This is really important because much of the snow clearing takes place in the dark hours before and after work.



    So, in summary, key points are;

    First and foremost, a hydraulically angling plow will likely cut your plow time in half, for every drive you plow. Since time is already precious, spend the money and add this before winter. You won't regret it, I guarantee you.


    1. A flexible rear ballast system with capacity ranges of 250 pounds to 800 pounds.

    2. A rubber scraper edge on your plow to reduce damage to the road surface and lawns, etc,

    3. Tires and traction, whether it's siping the tires, going to HDAP's or whatever.

    4. Avoid having metal make contact with the surface, whether it's the plow edge, tire chains, etc. as you will end up marring the surface over time.

    5. Use snow melt very sparingly. It doesn't take as much as most people apply unless you are applying to sheet ice like in an ice storm. Then, you gotta do what you gotta do. One ice storm we had this winter, I used as much snow melt during the ONE ice storm as I did the ENTIRE winter for normal use. I used 650 pounds of snow melt in the one storm, but that's what it took to make the conditions safe for me to operate and for others to get up and down their driveways.


    Thank you so much for taking the time to give such detailed information. I spent some time today with the plow pushing some dirt before I modify the blade with the rubber edge so I could understand how the plow feels on the tractor and what to expect during operation. I'm very pleased with the ability to judge the blade and get close to garage doors and sidewalks. I have already checked on the angling kit, it is $500 and I plan to add before winter.

    My neighbors and myself know all about trucks plowing the snow. The subdivsion just replaced 158' of curbing that the plow destroyed last winter(24" snow, biggest in 10 years). I was previously cleaning my driveway with a shovel because any plow you hired would do some type of damage. While I will agree that 2.2 miles of road it is probably quicker and warmer but in a foot of snow we have always experienced a lot of damage. Just for reference, I will not be agreeing to plow the subdivision, only driveways. I will probably plow 10-20 driveways the first year and I may pick up the additional 40 the following year if I feel that myself and my machine can handle the work load.

    I was skeptical about the salt spreader before I started hearing everyones concern about damage to the tractor but now I know with my OCD that all never work out. I drive my wife crazy cleaning the tractor already.

    I think I will try my tires this year and see how they do. If I have any issues they have the terra-grips on Amazon and I can get them before the second snow fall. Most snows here are less than 6".

    Thank you, again.
    BigJim55 and jdforever like this.

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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdforever View Post
    I'm with Sulley on this one. I don't use chains either, but I also don't deal with 10" plus snows. I put 2" spacers on the rear of my 1025R and grooved my tires. The spacers add a tremendous amount of stability, especially because of the cab, while the grooves in the tires greatly improve traction. Proper ballast also plays a big part in traction. Depending on the amount and weight of the snow, I will use between 400lb and 600lb of 3 point ballast.

    The width of spacers that your tractor can accommodate is dependent on the width of your mmm, if you have one. There are a number of threads regarding that subject.
    I really want to get some spacers because where I live it is very hilly, I just haven't taken time to do the research yet. I need to do that.
    jdforever likes this.

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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportshot2 View Post
    Did I miss where you listed what tires you have on your tractor? Turf tires are just fine for snow in fact they give you better traction then any type of non sipped bar tires. Contact patch and enough weight is where it’s at. If I were you the first thing I’d do is get a rubber or plastic plow edge. Steel edges raise hell if you don’t use plow shoes. From there I would only worry about having enough ballast.

    You should wait and see how the tractor performs before changing tires or adding chains. If a heavy wet snow is forecast go out 1/2 way through the storm and plow the slushy stuff. That will make a huge difference if you get 10” total. The bottom 3-4 inches would be the hardest to move.

    Do you live in a major snow area? Your tractor is a very capable snow removal machine, give yourself some time to acquire some experience before buying stuff you may never use.
    It has R4 tires and I agree, I'm going to see how they perform before I make any decisions. Our average snowfall is 4-6 inches.

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    ejb69's Avatar
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    Around here the road crews run chains on their graders, dump trucks, front end loaders, etc for the bigger snow events. They don’t use chains all the time, just when needed. I put chains on the rear of my 1026R in mid November and leave them on until April . Once you get a layer of packed snow or ice under the snow chains are needed.
    keane and joeymjustice like this.
    Eric

    2011 1026R / H120 / 60D auto-connect, independent-lift mmm / 54" snowblower / 4' KK Pro rotary mower / KK 4' tiller

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