To chain or not to chain?
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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    To chain or not to chain?

    This is a video coming in my subdivision and coming up my driveway. I would probably scrape a good portion of this road if the snow is under 6". Should I buy the 1.5" wheels spacers so I can use chains? I know some say you can do it without wheel spacers but I'd rather not deal with worrying if something is rubbing. You guys are always awesome and make so many good suggestions it really reduces my "live and learn" decisions which usually leads to spending more money.

    https://youtu.be/NA_hcv5vXdA


    1025R
    Last edited by joeymjustice; 06-10-2019 at 06:16 PM.

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    SulleyBear's Avatar
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    Chains will chew the crap out of the blacktop finish. You won't need chains if you properly ballast. I have never had chains on my tractor and our roads have a 9 degree grade....you might still want the spacers for stability. Personally, I think you should try the Terra Grips first. You will be shocked at the damage to the asphalt surface regular chains will do and if someone says "Well, then don't spin the tires", they obviously haven't plowed much snow.....sometimes, it can't be avoided.

    I am going to bet you add power angling after a few times plowing........It's so much faster and safer to be able to put the snow where it's best. Looking at the video, the snow should be on one side of the road and then the other and you have to REALLY be careful about knowing exactly where the drop off edge is or you will have a very unpleasant ride, possibly a rollover.

    With the drop off along side your roads, you have to push the snow completely off the road or its going to be down to one lane in a hurry......

    Let me also tell you that plowing the roads is painfully slow on the tractor. I know, you have time and will enjoy the seat time, but it becomes a matter of practicality. If I were you and knowing what I know about plowing snow with these machines, I wouldn't committ to plowing the road and driveways until you have done it. Its going to take longer than you think..........much longer......

    I have my plowing route down to a science, every single move is carefully planned for maximum efficiency. I plow about 1,200 feet of roads and our roads are 36 feet wide and my plow is 87" wide and along with the 22 driveways I plow, it takes me at least 3 hours. 3 Hours per plow outing is a LOT of time in the seat when its below freezing. I usually start between 2:30am and 3:30am, depending upon the snowfall and day of the week.
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeymjustice View Post
    This is a video coming in my subdivision and coming up my driveway. I would probably scrape a good portion of this road if the snow is under 6". Should I buy the 1.5" wheels spacers so I can use chains? I know some say you can do it without wheel spacers but I'd rather not deal with worrying if something is rubbing. You guys are always awesome and make so many good suggestions it really reduces my "live and learn" decisions which usually leads to spending more money.

    https://youtu.be/NA_hcv5vXdA


    1025R
    your gonna plow the whole subdivision? Hope your getting compansation for the use of your equipment and time. I'm not familiar with your location but i have had my time in the snow and ice and can remember more than once when barely moviung and then the tractor just starts sliding out of control down hill. That will only happen on a hard road surface like asphalt and will never happen with chains or on dirt and damage to asphalt is not hard to repair, besides safety first remember

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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SulleyBear View Post
    Chains will chew the crap out of the blacktop finish. You won't need chains if you properly ballast. I have never had chains on my tractor and our roads have a 9 degree grade....you might still want the spacers for stability. Personally, I think you should try the Terra Grips first. You will be shocked at the damage to the asphalt surface regular chains will do and if someone says "Well, then don't spin the tires", they obviously haven't plowed much snow.....sometimes, it can't be avoided.

    I am going to bet you add power angling after a few times plowing........It's so much faster and safer to be able to put the snow where it's best. Looking at the video, the snow should be on one side of the road and then the other and you have to REALLY be careful about knowing exactly where the drop off edge is or you will have a very unpleasant ride, possibly a rollover.

    With the drop off along side your roads, you have to push the snow completely off the road or its going to be down to one lane in a hurry......

    Let me also tell you that plowing the roads is painfully slow on the tractor. I know, you have time and will enjoy the seat time, but it becomes a matter of practicality. If I were you and knowing what I know about plowing snow with these machines, I wouldn't committ to plowing the road and driveways until you have done it. Its going to take longer than you think..........much longer......

    I have my plowing route down to a science, every single move is carefully planned for maximum efficiency. I plow about 1,200 feet of roads and our roads are 36 feet wide and my plow is 87" wide and along with the 22 driveways I plow, it takes me at least 3 hours. 3 Hours per plow outing is a LOT of time in the seat when its below freezing. I usually start between 2:30am and 3:30am, depending upon the snowfall and day of the week.

    Thank you, Sulleybear. Your knowledge on snow plowing is much appreciated. I do not plan to commit to anything the first year other than a few neighbors driveways and some pre-treatment. I do plan to assist on a few of the roads just to get an understanding of what I may want to commit to in the future. The complete subdivision is 2.2 miles long, most of the roads being 16' wide with the exception of a few intersections that are large flat areas. I don't think I want to do anything that time consuming, my day job would prevent that. I would rather not even consider chains but was just concerned on some of the steeper areas.
    jdforever likes this.

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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfloyd4445 View Post
    your gonna plow the whole subdivision? Hope your getting compansation for the use of your equipment and time. I'm not familiar with your location but i have had my time in the snow and ice and can remember more than once when barely moviung and then the tractor just starts sliding out of control down hill. That will only happen on a hard road surface like asphalt and will never happen with chains or on dirt and damage to asphalt is not hard to repair, besides safety first remember
    I wouldn't commit to the entire subdivision. It would be difficult to commit that much time, the subdivision is 2.2 miles long. I will mostly do driveways where a smaller tractor can do a cleaner job and do less damage.

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    Personally, I'd opt to have a set of chains available.

    I bought my tractor in May 2014 and bought chains that fall figuring I'd use them to plow. The first storm came before I ever got them on and I found I didn't need them. The chains sat in my garage until this past winter. We got one good storm that dumped 10" of slush and I just couldn't keep the wheels from spinning enough to move anything. After 4 hours of fighting and only getting 1/2 way done, I pulled in to the garage and put the chains on. 20 minutes of plowing with the chains on and I was done. They do mark up asphalt a little but I prefer to have them if I need them.
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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Admin, I apologize I just now figured out this should be in another thread other than SCUT. Sorry, I'm learning.

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    Personally I'd buy a plow for the truck and make short work of that and easily plow the whole subdivision from the comfort of your heated truck. You could easily pay for the plow setup in a single season. My driveway is 170 feet long and 4 cars wide. The only thing I would consider using the tractor for would be stacking snow if we had too much. I could see my driveway probably taking a couple hours on the tractor vs about 20 minutes in the truck. I've been plowing commercial lots for a contractor now for about 15 years. $90 per hour to sit in my truck with all the amenities is easy money. I bought a used setup for my last truck, plowed with it for 10 years and sold it for what I paid when I bought this truck.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    rtgt and theduke like this.

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    joeymjustice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noneckg View Post
    Personally I'd buy a plow for the truck and make short work of that and easily plow the whole subdivision from the comfort of your heated truck. You could easily pay for the plow setup in a single season. My driveway is 170 feet long and 4 cars wide. The only thing I would consider using the tractor for would be stacking snow if we had too much. I could see my driveway probably taking a couple hours on the tractor vs about 20 minutes in the truck. I've been plowing commercial lots for a contractor now for about 15 years. $90 per hour to sit in my truck with all the amenities is easy money. I bought a used setup for my last truck, plowed with it for 10 years and sold it for what I paid when I bought this truck.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    Nice setup. I just do this for fun and to help neighbors out. I work 55 hours a week already....lol.
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    A truck would simply be a more efficient way to accomplish your task. (And warmer! Haha!)

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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