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    bama21fs's Avatar
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    Storing diesel

    I want to get a 30 gallon plastic drum to store diesel to feed my JD 1025R. I would much rather have a steel drum but the plastic ones I have seen are far cheaper. I know, especially the plastic drums need to be sheltered from the sun to avoid algae. I guess; my question is what is the best plastic drum at a cheap price and where to get it. Thanks in advance!


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    I’ve never heard of algae growing in a diesel container but you can get a locking lid steel drum with a bung and vent at the local recycle yard for 10 bucks a pop if they have any around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bama21fs View Post
    I want to get a 30 gallon plastic drum to store diesel to feed my JD 1025R. I would much rather have a steel drum but the plastic ones I have seen are far cheaper. I know, especially the plastic drums need to be sheltered from the sun to avoid algae. I guess; my question is what is the best plastic drum at a cheap price and where to get it. Thanks in advance!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Kbar View Post
    I’ve never heard of algae growing in a diesel container but you can get a locking lid steel drum with a bung and vent at the local recycle yard for 10 bucks a pop if they have any around.
    Algae in diesel fuel storage tanks is more common than you might think.

    https://www.bellperformance.com/bell...sel-fuel-algae

    The problem with steel drums is it's not IF they will start to rust but WHEN. A lot of folks with steel drums are shocked when they find the inside has accumulated significant rust resulting in fuel contamination. That is one reason the poly tanks have started to become so popular.

    Below is an informative YT video showing rust in a steel drum. If you aren't familiar with this guy he is incredibly meticulous to the point of being semi-OCD.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Ma4uEoNWA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgayman View Post
    Algae in diesel fuel storage tanks is more common than you might think.

    https://www.bellperformance.com/bell...sel-fuel-algae

    The problem with steel drums is it's not IF they will start to rust but WHEN. A lot of folks with steel drums are shocked when they find the inside has accumulated significant rust resulting in fuel contamination. That is one reason the poly tanks have started to become so popular.

    Below is an informative YT video showing rust in a steel drum. If you aren't familiar with this guy he is incredibly meticulous to the point of being semi-OCD.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Ma4uEoNWA
    Not just algae, but bacteria and fungi will also grow in diesel fuel, especially biodiesel. Those bacteria and fungi can degrade the fuel. They need water in the fuel in order to propagate, and their growth is aided by warm temps and sunlight.

    As I try to come up with diesel fuel storage options that don't involve trying to muscle 5 gallon cans at awkward angles, I've finally decided that I need to have a storage plan other than 5 gallon cans. I've been wrestling with how much to store, where to store it, and in what kind of container. I considered poly containers vs steel vs stainless steel. Ultimately, I opted for 30 gallons in a steel drum. Here's my thought process FWIW. Sorry if they seem kind of random:

    • I don't want the diesel fuel I'm storing to be sitting around, especially in a partially-filled barrel. Partially-filled barrels, especially larger ones (55 gallons) will suffer more condensation and water accumulation. Diesel fuel will degrade based on bacterial/fungal growth, as well as sludging up based on algea formation.
    • If water accumulates, rust can form. This can lead to filtering problems (plugged filters).
    • If water accumulates, bacteria, fungi, and algae can form. This is more likely if there is low fuel turnover, if the fuel is stored where it can get warmer (outside), and if sunlight is available in a plastic container.
    • It seemed apparent to me that in order to minimize condensation, I needed to be able to keep the drum mostly filled, therefore it had to be easy to fill.
    • Since I would be storing inside the garage to minimize temp changes, I wanted a small footprint. Storing on a pallet is a no-go because I didn't want to waste the floor space
    • Maneuvering the barrel into the back of my truck on anything other than a pallet was going to be dicey. I wanted loading and unloading the barrel to/from the truck to be quick, simple, and painless --> tractor up to the barrel, fork it, load it, drive to the gas pump, fill it, drive it home, unload it.
    • So it came down to 30 gallons, so as to provide more turnover rather than less, to have smaller floor footprint, and to be easier to load into the truck.
    • The choice was now steel vs plastic. I found new carbon steel 30 gallon drums running around $100. New blue poly drums running around $60. Stainless steel, which would have been perfect, run around $500-$600.
    • I'd be storing outside, making me less comfortable with the poly drums, as well as concerns about how well the plastic bung would stand up to the steel crank pump that I'd be screwing into it and cranking, and I was concerned about how I'd be loading the barrel into the truck.


    Ultimately, I opted for a new, lined, 30 gallon tight-head steel drum with a Fill-Rite FR112 crank pump, a 3/4" NPT filter. It will be rolling around in the garage on a little drum dolly




    but when it needs filling, I'll load it into the back of my truck by tractoring up to the barrel and lifting it with the drum fork thing. This thing is reported not to work with plastic drums, thereby limiting my options for easily lifting it into the back of my truck to fill it with diesel.

    Last edited by MacCool; 09-15-2019 at 07:30 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bama21fs View Post
    I want to get a 30 gallon plastic drum to store diesel to feed my JD 1025R. I would much rather have a steel drum but the plastic ones I have seen are far cheaper. I know, especially the plastic drums need to be sheltered from the sun to avoid algae. I guess; my question is what is the best plastic drum at a cheap price and where to get it. Thanks in advance!


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    Things will grow in steel tanks also not just plastic. Either will require a bio guard additive for long term storage of D.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacCool View Post
    Not just algae, but bacteria and fungi will also grow in diesel fuel, especially biodiesel. Those bacteria and fungi can degrade the fuel. They need water in the fuel in order to propagate, and their growth is aided by warm temps and sunlight.

    As I try to come up with diesel fuel storage options that don't involve trying to muscle 5 gallon cans at awkward angles, I've finally decided that I need to have a storage plan other than 5 gallon cans. I've been wrestling with how much to store, where to store it, and in what kind of container. I considered poly containers vs steel vs stainless steel. Ultimately, I opted for 30 gallons in a steel drum. Here's my thought process FWIW. Sorry if they seem kind of random:

    • I don't want the diesel fuel I'm storing to be sitting around, especially in a partially-filled barrel. Partially-filled barrels, especially larger ones (55 gallons) will suffer more condensation and water accumulation. Diesel fuel will degrade based on bacterial/fungal growth, as well as sludging up based on algea formation.
    • If water accumulates, rust can form. This can lead to filtering problems (plugged filters).
    • If water accumulates, bacteria, fungi, and algae can form. This is more likely if there is low fuel turnover, if the fuel is stored where it can get warmer (outside), and if sunlight is available in a plastic container.
    • It seemed apparent to me that in order to minimize condensation, I needed to be able to keep the drum mostly filled, therefore it had to be easy to fill.
    • Since I would be storing inside the garage to minimize temp changes, I wanted a small footprint. Storing on a pallet is a no-go because I didn't want to waste the floor space
    • Maneuvering the barrel into the back of my truck on anything other than a pallet was going to be dicey. I wanted loading and unloading the barrel to/from the truck to be quick, simple, and painless --> tractor up to the barrel, fork it, load it, drive to the gas pump, fill it, drive it home, unload it.
    • So it came down to 30 gallons, so as to provide more turnover rather than less, to have smaller floor footprint, and to be easier to load into the truck.
    • The choice was now steel vs plastic. I found new carbon steel 30 gallon drums running around $100. New blue poly drums running around $60. Stainless steel, which would have been perfect, run around $500-$600.
    • I'd be storing outside, making me less comfortable with the poly drums, as well as concerns about how well the plastic bung would stand up to the steel crank pump that I'd be screwing into it and cranking, and I was concerned about how I'd be loading the barrel into the truck.


    Ultimately, I opted for a new, lined, 30 gallon tight-head steel drum with a Fill-Rite FR112 crank pump, a 3/4" NPT filter. It will be rolling around in the garage on a little drum dolly
    [img]
    [img]

    but when it needs filling, I'll load it into the back of my truck by tractoring up to the barrel and lifting it with the drum fork thing. This thing is reported not to work with plastic drums, thereby limiting my options for easily lifting it into the back of my truck to fill it with diesel.

    [img]
    Most of the parts arrived so I put this together tonight. Looks like it will meet my needs. We'll know soon.


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    As a side note, putting this diesel refueling thing together along with my scrapping and replacing my 150 gallon gasoline storage tank and reading about options....I was amused and a little astonished to note that it's illegal to pump your own gas and your own diesel at gas stations in Oregon and New Jersey. I had no idea. What's even funnier is to read the published comments from gas customers as well as the blathering of politicians in those states that try to justify such a silly set of legislative prohibitions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacCool View Post
    As a side note, putting this diesel refueling thing together along with my scrapping and replacing my 150 gallon gasoline storage tank and reading about options....I was amused and a little astonished to note that it's illegal to pump your own gas and your own diesel at gas stations in Oregon and New Jersey. I had no idea. What's even funnier is to read the published comments from gas customers as well as the blathering of politicians in those states that try to justify such a silly set of legislative prohibitions.
    So I knew there were some states that this was the case, but it brings up a question. Can you fill "storage" cans for your equipment/toys?
    I would assume... but you never know.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cutty72 View Post
    So I knew there were some states that this was the case, but it brings up a question. Can you fill "storage" cans for your equipment/toys?
    I would assume... but you never know.
    If it's more than 109 gallons (IIRC), the container has to be DOT certified to be on the road. Not really applicable in my situation since I'll be storing the fuel at home and whatever I store it in, it has to be small enough be able to lift with my 1023E, put it in the bed of my truck, and drive it over to the convenience store to fill with diesel. I opted for 30 gallons since it will be really easy to load and take to the store, and so that I'd have enough turnover that I can minimize condensation/water along with bacteria/fungi/algae. I have a 150 gallon tank at home for gasoline, but I use that gas a lot more than the diesel so it has to be bigger. In that case, I can get the premium non-oxygenated delivered whenever I need it, as long as it's more than 100 gallons, which allows me to avoid the delivery fee.
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