"Breaking in a new machine"
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    "Breaking in a new machine"

    On my 1025 I had a lot of chances to move equipment around the yard, mow a little, and putz around with small projects for the first few hrs, then use it for blowing snow for the winter before really opening it up and making it work hard. Fast forward to 2019. My new 2025 has 2.1 hrs on it. Other than using the back hoe for 45 minutes at little more than an idle, this machine has not even mowed my lawn. I just went to look at a job that will be brush hogging 5 or 6 acres of pasture that has not seen cattle for about 2 or 3 yrs. No trees or brush but a lot of 5 ft goldenrod and grass. Id guess 5 or 6 hrs of steady brush hog, maybe more, work with 2 .1 hrs on the engine. Ive heard "vary the rpms occasionally". Ive heard "open it up and leave it there". Ive also heard "start low and increase it as you go". Brush hog work seems like a good way to get used to the machine and break it in. Steady work and not as tough as something like tilling or plowing but do any of you have a favorite routine or theory of working a brand new machine? In the past I have always just worked a new machine the same way I plan to run it in the future, near WOT but varied it somewhat every 20 minutes or so. I figure "breaking it in" is a one shot deal so if anyone with knowledge has suggestions, Im all ears. Im sure as usual, Ill be on edge listening for any unusual sounds, lurches, or blips. With 90 hrs on the 1025 I was jusr getting to the point where I felt like I could depend on it. Im always like a new papa for the first few months.
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    PJR832's Avatar
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    My 2025R had about 7 hours of snow plowing on it where I was able to vary rpms somewhat, then went right straight to tilling and mowing at PTO rpms and it has been rock solid. Not saying that break in isn't necessary but IMO it's a little bit over thought about at times. I will say that this summer I feel that my tractor is running the 5' rotary cutter noticeably easier than last summer when it was still breaking in.
    Pat
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    MacCool's Avatar
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    “Break-in” is unnecessary in modern engines - a concept for a bygone era. Just run it.
    Ray_PA, keane, Tractor Tim and 2 others like this.

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    My thought would be, to keep a eye on temperature, check engine oil and hydraulic fluid frequently. Since you'll be brush hogging, don't forget to check your air filter. As long as everything checks out, I wouldn't worry.
    Greg

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacCool View Post
    “Break-in” is unnecessary in modern engines - a concept for a bygone era. Just run it.
    You should say break in is not as important in todays world as it used to be but is still necessary if you wish a long life from your engine.
    bearing cylinders pistons still need to wear in and high rpm heavy loads can cause the engine to heat up causing excessive wear on piston skirts and rings. You won't see the temp gauge move cause the coolant temp will be within spec but the metals of the piston cylinders and bearing will be very hot. My 2032r has 40 hours and i thought it was good to go so i drove it in high range on a blm road crossing my property up close to 2500rpm for less than a minute. When i slowed down and was driving into my yard i noticed a little smoke and smelled a burnt smell. Thought maybe something was on fire so got down and looked finding nothing. Then i realized what had happened was that high speed on asphalt even for such a short time had caused the engine parts to heat up and expand then when i slowed down the opposite happened and combustion gasses not fully consummed were escaping causeing the smoke. This tells me my engine has not yet fully broken in and i need to take it easy.
    Brush hoggin can put a load on your engine with sudden load changes for a few seconds but this is good for break in. You want to avoid steady loading at steady rpms for long periods something thats not likely to happen brush hoggin unkept pastures.
    arlen, joshn3448 and Toughsox like this.
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    Breaking in a new machine

    Thank you Floyd. Thats about what I was thinking. Ive been able to break in several new power plants over the years and Ive always been told to vary the rpms and load. Its been a while and other than my 1025 this is my only diesel. I guess it cant hurt anything to go a little easy. The next job looks like spreading 30 or 40 tons of stone, lots of up and down so thatll be good also
    Toughsox likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiwire View Post
    Thank you Floyd. Thats about what I was thinking. Ive been able to break in several new power plants over the years and Ive always been told to vary the rpms and load. Its been a while and other than my 1025 this is my only diesel. I guess it cant hurt anything to go a little easy. The next job looks like spreading 30 or 40 tons of stone, lots of up and down so thatll be good also
    your welcome. I know the feeling you have i get that feeling every time i get a new toy and am never confident i am doing the correct thing. Tractors are engineered to work all day at a certain rpm with a varying load. D fuel has an energy density about 1/3 greater than gasoline per gallon a definite advantage over gas when under load.
    Toughsox likes this.
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    There are SOOOO many threads on this forum concerning engine break-in.

    Engines are broken in on a dyno for many years now so they are broken in before they are every put in the tractor, of anything else for that matter.

    It is incorrect thinking to think that piston rings and bearings have to wear in, they do not.

    First, piston rings are made of extremely hard material and they do not wear in, never did. If they do, your engine will not last very long. What makes an engine start to use oil is mostly valve guide wear, not piston rings, especially in more modern engines.

    Second, bearings do not wear in. In fact the bearings in the engine better not be touching anything except a film of oil or again, your engine will not last very long.

    The only reason, and has always been the only reason for breaking in an engine, is the camshaft and followers. The camshaft and followers must be broken in at initial start up. That said, they are broken in on the dyno, so again, they are already broken in when you get your tractor.

    Many modern day engines have roller camshaft followers so they do not even need broken in. Now, the Yanmar does not have roller followers.

    So, don't be afraid to use your tractor, you will not hurt it as long as you keep the radiator grille cleaned off and keep it serviced and of course use it the way it is intended to be used, yea right, we are all guilty of pushing the limits sometimes.
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    That is the first I ever heard of all engines being dyno tested and broke in prior to installation. Read Are all of your engines started and run on a dyno before you ship them? where he tells us that that is a very expensive proposition and they don't normally do it anyway. A google search did not show where new vehicle manufacturers did this. It is common for vehicle manufacturers to roll off a new vehicle every 60 seconds. There is no time for the hours/days necessary to perform "break in" procedures.

    I believe the real truth is that engines are much better designed and assembled today than they were many years ago. I used to get rid of a vehicle that was approaching 100,000 miles, but now I buy used and most of those vehicles are near 100,000 miles or in some cases, well beyond that. While it is true that the initial miles are not as critical as they were years ago, it is still important that a vehicle not be abused during those first miles, maybe as many as 500-1000. In the case of tractors, that could be 50-100 hours. That would be called protecting your investment and these tractors are expensive enough to be considered an investment. My 4066R cost more than any of my cars/trucks that I have ever had. I am of the opinion that I would not expose a brand new tractor to solid brush hog use for the first initial hours. Running a brush hog works a tractor pretty hard. Mowing your yard is much less stressful to a new tractor.

    Dave
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