Hydraulics and fire...
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
Like Tree40Likes

Thread: Hydraulics and fire...

  1. Top | #1
    Oncebitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:28 PM
    Location
    Webster, NY
    Posts
    117
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts

    Hydraulics and fire...

    So I currently burn 5 or 6 trees a year on average as they die and fall (or threaten to fall) around the property. Anywhere from 40' - 100'ers. I currently dump them into the fire pit with the FEL and that works fine, but I'm considering a grapple. With the cylinder mounted so far forward to operate the grabble, am I just asking for trouble exposing it to extreme heat repeatedly? It may be pretty close to the flames for 5 or 6 seconds at a time. Enough to distort or ruin seals?

    Anyone else do this?
    PJR832 likes this.
    2016 1025R, FEL, 60" MMM, Artillian 42" forks, Artillian loader bucket, Frontier 48" box blade, Turftime 54E plug aerator, I-Match, everything Heavy Hitch makes, everything Ken's Bolt On makes...

  2. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. Top | #2
    coaltrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 05:44 PM
    Location
    NW Penna
    Posts
    20,530
    Thanks
    1,125
    Thanked 3,159 Times in 2,313 Posts
    I’d be just as concerned with melting the plastic hood, grille, etc on the tractor.

    Why not make a pile and burn it. When it is done, add more, and light it off again.
    ~Stan~
    It is what it is
    Knowledge is power, ignorance is bliss
    2520 w/200CX w/62D2

  4. Top | #3
    Drifterbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:40 AM
    Location
    Hampton Ill
    Posts
    2,721
    Thanks
    1,086
    Thanked 318 Times in 279 Posts
    I have a burn pile that gets burned about once a year. I start it burning then has it burns down I constantly push the pile smaller till its about gone. I always used a box blade behind my 1020. last spring I used the fel on my 1020 with my forks, It worked well. I got my grapple after it I plan on using it this year. I think for the small amount of time you are over the fire it should be fine. Good luck and be safe.
    OldmanX, Marlin, ky_shawn and 1 others like this.
    2018 2038R 220R FEL, 72" Mower, Radial tires, wheel spacers, dual rear SVCs, CtA grapple, single point for FEL, 60" broom with front hitch;2018 1025R 54"auto connect, HDAP tires, Quick Hitch, Ballast Box, Etc...;1967 1020 3cylinder gas, #47 FEL, 72" Landpride Grooming Mower, 6ft box blade, For Sale(no Hurry); life Member NRA since 1974

  5. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. Top | #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:13 AM
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    7,877
    Thanks
    626
    Thanked 745 Times in 632 Posts
    Ive seen a mini excavator mix many burn piles without issue.

  7. Top | #5
    ky_shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Last Online
    10-16-2018 @ 09:44 AM
    Location
    Bluegrass state
    Posts
    1,933
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 270 Times in 225 Posts
    I use my loader/grapple to drop items into fire and also use it to push the fire around to burn everything down as much as possible. I don't leave it in the flame/heat very long and other than additional smoke/soot on top of what's already there from the exhaust, no problems. I would assume your results may vary depending upon the size of fire you have.
    rtgt and Marlin like this.
    3520 (cab, eHydro, R1's, 300x fel, forks, grapple) Frontier 5' cutter, 7' Tufline disk, 6' Gill pulverizer, 6' box blade, 6' rear blade, TSC post auger, 6' Woods rfm, 8' JD rotary hoe, 8' Brillion cultipacker, 6' field cultivator, Tarter spreader, Fimco 3 point sprayer, subsoiler, ken's bolt on hooks & clevis, JD Z920 ZTR

  8. Top | #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    10-25-2019 @ 10:14 AM
    Location
    SWVA
    Posts
    286
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 26 Times in 16 Posts
    Tagged for interest as I have a big honkin' pile too.

    My thoughts are forks or bucket?

    Maybe use the hoe to push stuff back in? I think I'll have my 3 pt. sprayer on the back though so I don't have to embarrass myself calling out the fire dept.

    Plus I might till a firebreak around the pile. Maybe I should start a "How do I burn a brush pile thread?"
    rtgt, BigJim55, Neb and 1 others like this.

  9. Top | #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    10-23-2019 @ 09:00 AM
    Location
    Neosho, MO
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    A lot of it's going to depend on the amount of heat produce, how long it's in that heat, and how long you allow it to cool.

    I've used mine to push in several burn piles while they burn without issue. I typically pile it up good, let it burn down, and then push more on top or push the pile into the middle a bit. While the bucket shields a lot of the heat from the hydraulics, you should be OK so long as you're not keeping it over the heat for more than a few seconds at a time.

    If nothing else, keep a sprayer or hose nearby to cool it off if you get concerned.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9MMMAC View Post
    Tagged for interest as I have a big honkin' pile too.

    My thoughts are forks or bucket?

    Maybe use the hoe to push stuff back in? I think I'll have my 3 pt. sprayer on the back though so I don't have to embarrass myself calling out the fire dept.

    Plus I might till a firebreak around the pile. Maybe I should start a "How do I burn a brush pile thread?"
    IMHO, I'd go with the bucket. You can push a bit better when you're pushing things in.

    That being said, if you're wanting to throw more brush on top, the forks would be better for that. You can get by with rolling it on top with the bucket, though, so long as you have it fairly close.

    If you're going to burn a pile, make sure you've cleared out anything dead that's going to burn. If you burn in the spring when everything's green, you should be good. If it's during the time of year when grass is dead or dead leaves are abound, then you need to drag or clean out around the pile to prevent it from spreading.

    Also be aware of what's around the pile, as embers are going to fly off the fire and land somewhere. Stay nearby and keep that sprayer handy so you can handle any flare ups while they're small.

    The biggest thing is to find the right day to burn. If the relative humidity (not humidity. Relative humidity is related to the amount of moisture in ground fuels) is high and winds are low. If there's snow on the ground or a recent rain has everything wet, that's a good time. Check the NWS or another good, reliable weather source to get that info.

    Keep in mind, too, if you burn anything big your likely going to burn/smolder overnight or maybe even a few days.

    Some quick tips from a 20-year firefighter.
    Tomfive, rtgt, rydplrs and 2 others like this.

  10. Top | #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:13 AM
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    7,877
    Thanks
    626
    Thanked 745 Times in 632 Posts
    The thing with front attachments is you will end up with tires in the heat/coals.
    BigJim55 likes this.

  11. Top | #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:05 PM
    Location
    Eastern Virginia, United States
    Posts
    4,635
    Thanks
    349
    Thanked 828 Times in 544 Posts

    Pushing into the fire

    It's not bad pushing tag ends of stuff into a burn pile with a bucket but you do have be be aware of where your tires are and what's on the sides. A long time ago, we did a prescribed burn and it blew into an area that wasn't intended to burn. To make a long story short, the Dept. of Forestry had a dozer on site and a burning stick got stuck in the engine shroud and they almost lost the dozer. That's a different scenario than a nice clean brush pile but it illustrates that you don't want to push too deep at anyone one point, maybe just not quite to the front tires and then move over.

    My hydraulic hoses to the grapple are on the lower part of the boom assembly. If I was doing something with fire they would be lifted and/or shielded but would probably use the bucket to push stuff in. The grapple is great for a lot of things but the bucket can be used to smash fire flat, push stuff etc.

    Treefarmer
    Tomfive, rtgt, BigJim55 and 2 others like this.
    John Deere 790, 300 loader w Ken's Bolt on Hooks & Piranha tooth bar, grapple, back blade, box blade, Bush Hog mower, couple of red tractors, hay equipment, various old stuff some red, one orange, some I don't remember

  12. Top | #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Last Online
    09-30-2019 @ 12:08 PM
    Location
    Central Louisiana
    Posts
    701
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 89 Times in 76 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Oncebitten View Post
    So I currently burn 5 or 6 trees a year on average as they die and fall (or threaten to fall) around the property. Anywhere from 40' - 100'ers. I currently dump them into the fire pit with the FEL and that works fine, but I'm considering a grapple. With the cylinder mounted so far forward to operate the grabble, am I just asking for trouble exposing it to extreme heat repeatedly? It may be pretty close to the flames for 5 or 6 seconds at a time. Enough to distort or ruin seals?

    Anyone else do this?
    I do it a lot. Built my grapple in 2014 and it's been used like that ever since. No problems so far. I worry more about the hoses but so far I've managed to dump and back away in plenty of time to prevent any heat damage.
    rtgt, rydplrs, BigJim55 and 1 others like this.

  13. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •