3 Point Snowblower Chain
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Thread: 3 Point Snowblower Chain

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    Wyobuckaroo's Avatar
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    3 Point Snowblower Chain

    There is a thread similar to this, but it seems focused on JD blowers that use a chain gear reduction on the what I would consider the primary drive side of the blower. Disregard that here.....

    My concern is with a 3 pt rear snow blower and the chain that drives the auger to guide snow into the impeller. After each use I try to clean the chain area, ends of the auger, and chain cover from the end of the shaft from the gearbox to the auger where the chain comes through the housing into the auger area.

    I view chain, and sprockets in a use like this as consumable items. That is they have a life span and need replaced as needed, not necessarily the same life span of other parts of the implement.

    I have seen some brands and models have an upside down L shaped bracket to shield the auger chain sprocket from snow, ice, or what ever. I thought of bolting a similar guard, but got to thinking that would be a prime place for snow to compact and freeze, causing more trouble than good it does.

    So, with this info in mind, knock on wood, so far just keeping the chain clean as possible, tension adjusted as it should, and make sure it is moving free before the next use has resulted in no bad experiences. But I want to continue problem free.

    Anyone with experience, good or bad with auger drive chains on 3 pt blowers ???
    Keep your stick on the ice... Red Green

    The further north you go, the more things that can and want to eat your horse and you. Grandpa Gilbert.

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    jgayman's Avatar
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    Given that virtually every 3PH snow blower ever made has a very similar chain drive mechanism for the auger I suspect you have nothing to worry about with the factory design. The chain turns at a fairly slow speed and should last a very long time.

    The most important thing you can do to ensure long chain life is to maintain the proper tension (a hair loose is always better than too tight) and lubricate it as recommended in the operator's manual. The Frontier 3PH snow blowers for example recommend to apply chain lube every 4 hours AND after every use. Given that the chain is directly subjected to snow and water applying chain lube immediately following each use would seem to be critical.
    keane likes this.
    2012 2720 -- 200CX Loader -- 54" Quick Attach Snow Blower -- Frontier LR5060 Rake -- Land Pride RB1660 Blade (Hydraulic Angle) -- Artillian 42" Forks -- Ken's Bolt on Grab Hooks -- Fit Rite Hydraulic top-link -- 2013 X500 for mowing duties

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    Wyobuckaroo's Avatar
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    The most important thing you can do to ensure long chain life is to maintain the proper tension (a hair loose is always better than too tight) and lubricate it as recommended in the operator's manual.
    XXX
    Yes.. Pretty much common sense use and maintenance is always the best idea. That and making sure it is maintained as it should be for the "off season" as well. One other small trick I have learned is to replace shear bolts before the beginning of the snow season and well lubricate the mating surfaces of parts of your shear bolt systems. Shear bolts do there job periodically, and are much easier to replace the bolt in the cold when well lubed and easily turned back into position. I use copper color anti seize lube for this.

    Again, rethinking this, sprockets and chain are more of a shorter life span parts rather than consumable parts. So with the exposure they get replacing every 3, 5, 7 seasons maybe is not an unreasonable thing to do. What ever it takes to NOT have to repair it in the middle of winter, plugged with snow, when it breaks down.
    keane likes this.
    Keep your stick on the ice... Red Green

    The further north you go, the more things that can and want to eat your horse and you. Grandpa Gilbert.

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