1025R Pipe Puller
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Thread: 1025R Pipe Puller

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    1025R Pipe Puller

    Has anyone every made a pipe puller or some sort of vibratory plow for your 1025R? Im looking to install some sprinkler systems, and instead of buying a new vibratory plow, I was curious if I could buy something or build one for my 3 point on tractor.
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    I have seen where people have modified a middle buster 3pt attachment from titan or heavy hitch "welded a pulling eye on it", problem doesn’t trench terribly deep & depending on your climate Frost will eventually push said pipe to the surface.
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    Quote Originally Posted by neblawncare23 View Post
    Has anyone every made a pipe puller or some sort of vibratory plow for your 1025R? Im looking to install some sprinkler systems, and instead of buying a new vibratory plow, I was curious if I could buy something or build one for my 3 point on tractor.
    Agri Supply has one that attaches to their single tine ripper. See the photos on this link. May give you some ideas. I'm thinking of building something along these lines to bury some irrigation tubing.

    Also some info at TractorByNet.
    Last edited by Roger47; 01-13-2019 at 09:14 PM.
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    I do irrigation installs professionally and while I do own a vibratory plow I built my own 3 pt sub soiler to try and run pipe. My property is rock solid soil and while it’s a wrestling match i gave up on the sub soiler and used the vibratory plow. It’s a guaranteed depth. If it had the traction it will cut through just about everything. The sub soiler didn’t go deep enough for my liking.

    Not sure where you are, here in Canada we use rolls of black poly pipe, Some US states use solid poly pieces. Most of my work is residential but my property is the second acreage I’ve done. While I have a lot more areas to do I’d go back to the vibratory plow.

    Plan your lines and zones. Buy your materials and rent a unit for the day.
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    Quote Originally Posted by neblawncare23 View Post
    ...instead of buying a new vibratory plow, I was curious if I could buy something or build one for my 3 point on tractor.
    I built one using parts from a subsoiler. It was intended to be used for cabling so only used a 3/4 tube, depth was well over a foot - but my soil is sandy loam, or in some areas, just sand; and the frost line is only a few inches deep - at most.

    Seems like renting would be a good option for installing a sprinkler system, especially in Nebraska where the frost line is significantly deeper.
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    I rented a Toro Dingo when I did mine. Myself and a helper started at the crack of dawn, by 7:00AM it was raining buckets, but we forged on as there was no refund for rain on the machine rental. We wrapped it by 8:00Pm that night, just before dusk. I probably have near 125 heads in my system.

    The Dingo is a walk behind machine on tracks, so it is well suited for this type of work. It came with both a plow blade head and a chain type trencher head. I had a mix of 1", 1-1/4", 1-1/2" and 2" lines. We utilized the black poly pipe on large diameter rolls that dombougie spoke of. We plowed everything but the 2" to a depth of 16". I utilized the trencher for the 2". It probably would have plowed it in OK, but the 2" was the main feed line to remote valve boxes. So I had control cabling to be buried along with it. I also ran a natural gas line down to my beach house in the same trench as much of the 2". We set the depth to maximum for that portion, about 3', laid the gas line in first, partially backfilled the trench, and followed with the 2" at 16" of depth. We buried our irrigation lines far deeper than the so-called professional around here, but in the 15+ years since we installed the system, I haven't had issues with line damage from tent stakes and other things being driven into the ground.

    There is a lot more to it than simply plowing pipe and connecting heads. I found some online tutorials that were very helpful in determining flow rates, pipe sizing, calculating head pressure losses on slopes, etc. I drew a to scale drawing of my property on graph paper, marking out the boundaries, structures and even the trees. I drew each zone in a different color pencil and had a different symbol to distinguish rotors from spray head, as well as what volume of the nozzle selection. I had a number of winter evenings spent on designing the system and compiling a materials list. Even today, I still refer to it when I have to service the system or I'm excavating on the property.

    For as efficient as the Dingo was for plowing in pipe, the rental fee, and what you're going spend fabricating your own plow, a Dingo rental may be mores cost effective.
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