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    Quick question about pulling...

    Hi all, I have a new 2025r, with JD quick hitch and weight box. I may have to tow a friends tractor home...question is...I have no attachment points yet. I plan on a heavy hitch with JD weights but for now, can I tow with a rope around the top hook of my quick hitch? Can this damage anything? I plan on getting some bolt on hooks for my bucket, and I may put one on the weight box too. Let me know if I have to watch out for something here.
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    Captain Hook Kennyd's Avatar
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    Use a shackle and pull from the draw bar, that's the thing down low in the rear under the PTO.
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    As a general rule, you always want your tow connection points to be below your axles. Lower is better.

    Pulling from a point above the axle takes weight off the front wheels. If you tow something heavy enough or whatever you are towing stops dead for some reason, your front wheels will come right up off the ground and they will come up high enough to flip you right over. If your connection point is below the axle and the towed item stops dead, it puts MORE weight o your front axle.

    Your 2025R has a hitch plate mounted below your rear PTO shaft. You can attach a clevis to that and than attach a rope or chain to the clevis.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimR View Post
    As a general rule, you always want your tow connection points to be below your axles. Lower is better.

    Pulling from a point above the axle takes weight off the front wheels. If you tow something heavy enough or whatever you are towing stops dead for some reason, your front wheels will come right up off the ground and they will come up high enough to flip you right over. If your connection point is below the axle and the towed item stops dead, it puts MORE weight o your front axle.

    Your 2025R has a hitch plate mounted below your rear PTO shaft. You can attach a clevis to that and than attach a rope or chain to the clevis.
    Hi Jim, it is always good to go as low as possible, but I wanted to point out that the old “towing below your axle puts more weight on the front wheels” theory is incorrect. The easiest example I can show you is go watch a video of a tractor pull and you’ll see them raise the front even though they attach below the axle. The reason that two wheel drive tractors have weights on the front is to give the rear wheels more weight when plowing and, of course, to keep the fronts on the ground.

    Still, lower is always better/safer.


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    Trailers I pull from the iMatch with a 2" receiver mounted. Heavy stuff like uprooting trees or pulling a vehicle .... makes more sense to me to pull low from the frame. I installed this, not for a 2" ball but for maximum attachment flexibility (shackles etc)


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    Quote Originally Posted by MacCool View Post
    Trailers I pull from the iMatch with a 2" receiver mounted. Heavy stuff like uprooting trees or pulling a vehicle .... makes more sense to me to pull low from the frame. I installed this, not for a 2" ball but for maximum attachment flexibility (shackles etc)



    I looked at that mount...does it in any way interfere with the rear PTO?
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJFlores View Post
    I looked at that mount...does it in any way interfere with the rear PTO?
    There is plenty of clearance for PTO driven implements with this style receiver hitch …
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milharri View Post
    Hi Jim, it is always good to go as low as possible, but I wanted to point out that the old “towing below your axle puts more weight on the front wheels” theory is incorrect. The easiest example I can show you is go watch a video of a tractor pull and you’ll see them raise the front even though they attach below the axle. The reason that two wheel drive tractors have weights on the front is to give the rear wheels more weight when plowing and, of course, to keep the fronts on the ground.

    Still, lower is always better/safer.


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    Actually the theory and physics are still valid. It’s just the driving power to the wheels is greater than the available traction, and drag created by what’s being pulled. In short, the front wheels would lift higher and faster the higher up the point of attachment.

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    Axle torque

    Quote Originally Posted by rydplrs View Post
    Actually the theory and physics are still valid. It’s just the driving power to the wheels is greater than the available traction, and drag created by what’s being pulled. In short, the front wheels would lift higher and faster the higher up the point of attachment.
    We all recognize that the torque on the rear axle/wheels tends to live the front. If you attache above the axle, the tow line also tends to lift the front. Put them together and there's little except front end weight to keep the front wheels down. Unfortunately as the front comes up, the moment arm (horizontal distance of front weights) gets shorter. So when you hitch above the axle as the front starts to come up, effectively the front weights become less effective. That makes the front come up even faster and puts more weight on the rear wheels increasing the traction, again increasing the rotational torque.

    Hitching above the axle is one of the deadly sins. If you do it often, sometimes even once, you will pretty much find yourself upside down. If you are lucky, your ROPS and seatbelt kept you alive.

    If you want a simple, visual demonstration find a toy tractor. Hitch a string above the rear axle and let it go down a steep incline on a board. When it hits the end of the string, the tractor will flip backwards. Tie the string below the axle and the tractor just stops. Big, big difference even without an engine also trying to flip the tractor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    We all recognize that the torque on the rear axle/wheels tends to live the front. If you attache above the axle, the tow line also tends to lift the front. Put them together and there's little except front end weight to keep the front wheels down. Unfortunately as the front comes up, the moment arm (horizontal distance of front weights) gets shorter. So when you hitch above the axle as the front starts to come up, effectively the front weights become less effective. That makes the front come up even faster and puts more weight on the rear wheels increasing the traction, again increasing the rotational torque.

    Hitching above the axle is one of the deadly sins. If you do it often, sometimes even once, you will pretty much find yourself upside down. If you are lucky, your ROPS and seatbelt kept you alive.

    If you want a simple, visual demonstration find a toy tractor. Hitch a string above the rear axle and let it go down a steep incline on a board. When it hits the end of the string, the tractor will flip backwards. Tie the string below the axle and the tractor just stops. Big, big difference even without an engine also trying to flip the tractor.

    Treefarmer
    Are you saying that a tractor won’t flip over backwards if hooked below the axle? Because that is most definitely false. It has already been discussed on this forum extensively.

    The pivot point on any vehicle is where the tires meet the ground and NOT where the axle is. The closer to the ground you attach the more leverage the vehicle has on the object, or the higher up you attach on the tractor the more leverage the object has in the tractor. The reason you notice such a big difference is because tying above the axle vs on the drawbar can move the attachment point 3’ down or more which can essentially reduce the leverage by 300% or more and not because there was an axle involved.

    It’s just like pulling down a tree. The higher up you tie your chain the more leverage you’ll get. The lower you tie the less leverage. The axle is not a pivot point because it’s floating in the air. I. E. There is no fulcrum at the point of the axle.

    Now, if the axle was stuck in a concrete block then it would be a pivot point and pulling below the axle would pull the front down (of course you wouldn’t be moving and you’d have to assume the load was pulling you backwards and that the tires had less traction than the concrete. lol). The axle is floating in air. No pivot point. When the fronts come up the axle goes back regardless of where the load is attached.

    As I have stated, watch a tractor pull, they hitch way down low and still pull the fronts off the ground. Big 4 wheel drive tractors get light up front which is a cause of hopping.

    Regardless, lower is better.


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