1945 B oil is solid sludge
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
Like Tree10Likes

Thread: 1945 B oil is solid sludge

  1. Top | #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Last Online
    06-01-2019 @ 02:06 PM
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    14
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    1945 B oil is solid sludge

    I recently started cleaning up my john deere B that my great grandfather purchased new in 1945. It has not ben used regularly since the 1970's. I started it and pulled it into the garage about 5 years ago. I just started to clean it up and try to get it in good running condition again. I pulled the drain plug on the motor oil and nothing came out, so I put my finger in the hole and its just solid Goo sludge like junk. I expected it to be nasty like milk but not like this. is there any way go get this junk out?
    thanks

  2. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. Top | #2
    tomd999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Last Online
    06-30-2019 @ 10:15 AM
    Location
    Manchvegas, NH area
    Posts
    1,965
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 422 Times in 285 Posts
    Hiya,

    A couple things may and one will get it out. First, I would try is a torpedo heater aimed at the sump for an hour or so to get it nice and hot, that should get it to flow. If that fails, put the drain plug back in, dump a quart of Kerosene in it, hit it again with the heater and try again. If both of those fail, drop the pan and scrape it out.

    In the 60's and early 70's there were issues with oil that was overheated that, when cooled, would solidify into a rubber like gel in the oil pan.

    Tom
    Dingeryote, rtgt and BigJim55 like this.
    2010 3320 Cab
    Loaded R3's, 300CX w/3rd SCV
    61" HD-Tooth Bar, 72" HD-bolt-on edge, Frontier Forx
    "A" front hitch, Mid-PTO, Air ride seat, Horn, Back-up alarm, Rear work lights, External mirrors, Auto cruise
    60HD broom. 366 Blade, 59 blower, i-Match
    Looking for: Rear Wheel Weight Set

    Stuff for Sale:
    New 200CX/H130 Masts 25/2720-2032R
    New Jamison Bryce adapter, cart and chute

    “Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself” Mark Twain

  4. Top | #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Last Online
    06-01-2019 @ 02:06 PM
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    14
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    thanks, I finally got it to drain. now to try and flush it out and refill it.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. Top | #4
    Evergreen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Last Online
    06-02-2017 @ 07:24 PM
    Location
    Mid-Michigan
    Posts
    740
    Thanks
    88
    Thanked 99 Times in 79 Posts
    A lot of old time farmers used thicker oils because they thought it offered more protection... That probably isn't helping you. Don't forget to check the transmission case too. Hopefully your luck will be better back there!

    To make sure your heirloom tractor survives long enough to be handed down again, I would suggest that you go far beyond simply scraping out the pan. There could be oil pooled and solidified on the bottom of the pistons and bores. There could also be buildup on the oil pump which might hinder its ability to push oil through the system. Or worse, it could throw a big chunk of sludge into an oil gallery in the engine and cause a blockage. Think of it like your tractor having a stroke. You'd never know there was a problem until it was too late.

    There isn't much to these old tractors so don't be afraid to really open it up. Wash everything in gasoline or mineral spirits and scrub it clean. Re-assemble with a good assembly lube, new rings and fresh gaskets after making sure everything is still within spec. After 70 years, it might need a little freshening up anyway.

    Good luck!
    Dingeryote, 5304, rtgt and 1 others like this.
    '50 Model M w/electronic ignition, 12v conversion, and a 3pt conversion plus a homemade snowplow, a Deere Model 51 trailer plow, a Woods RM59 finish mower, a Bark Buster splitter, and a few other toys.
    '69 Sears Suburban 14 48" deck and 42" back blade, an estate rake, and a sweeper.
    '07 F250 XL Powerstroke, crew cab, short box, 4x4.
    '85 F150... I finally sold my very first truck after racking up over half-a-million miles on the original drivetrain.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Evergreen For This Useful Post:

    RobertB (03-18-2017)

  8. Top | #5
    tlock0331's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Last Online
    08-20-2019 @ 09:50 PM
    Location
    NE Kansas
    Posts
    219
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
    on some of mine, i put in a couple gallons of diesel and let that soak a few days, then i took a dip stick and taped a rubber line to it a couple inches down from the end, then hooked my compressor to it and shoved it back up the hole, the end of the stick acts like a scrapper and air pressure to blow big chucks up. That stick is tough to scrap with and flexible enough to push around in the blind hole. The only down side is chunks can get caught up by the oil pump, so i always flush a couple times with diesel.

    The only other option is to pull the block because there is no "oil pan" to take off. The drain plug is cast into the main case. The good thing about doing that is its not to difficult, and if you are careful, you can reuse the head gasket. With the block out of the way its a big hole to get into and really clean it out and a lot easier to flush.

    oh yea, my edit, if the crank case was that bad i would expect the transmission to be worse, drain out what you can, put in 5 or 6 gallons of diesel and drive it around, rise and repeat till you can live with what color the diesel is when it comes out haha
    Last edited by tlock0331; 12-13-2015 at 08:54 PM.
    BigJim55 and Evergreen like this.

  9. Top | #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Last Online
    07-15-2019 @ 06:47 PM
    Location
    Liberty,Mo.
    Posts
    13
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
    When I did mine I took it all apart. Head and block apart. I'm glad I did as I had to scrape sludge from every nook and cranny. I also took the oil pump apart which was full of crap. It's a lot of work but was worth it.

    BigJim55 likes this.

  10. Top | #7
    89420's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Last Online
    08-06-2019 @ 01:00 PM
    Location
    st.louis
    Posts
    568
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 55 Times in 52 Posts
    as others said put some diesel in the crankcase and run it to operating temp. will clean inside engine well.then change oil and filter
    1935 jd model D
    65 110 rf
    77 jd 80 cart
    83 420 rear pto, 3 point hitch
    88 332 46"deck s
    89 420 60" deck
    89 318
    jd #8 chainsaw (remington)
    2)jd 35ev chainsaws (echo)
    jd 50v chainsaw (echo
    jd 60v chainsaw (echo)
    jd 70v chainsaw (echo) sold
    jd 80ev chainsaw (echo)
    jd cs40 chainsaw (efco 940)
    husqvarna 240 chainsaw
    husqvarna 372xp chainsaw
    husqvarna 455 chainsaw
    2)dolmar 117 chainsaws
    dolmar 100 chainsaw

  11. Top | #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    06-02-2016 @ 07:30 PM
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    You may want to pull the oil pump and check the screen. A friend of mine just purchased a 41 JD H and after starting had no oil pressure. Before starting it he changed the oil and found it drained in clumps. The screen on the oil pump looked like it was coated in tar.

    Sent from my GT-P5113 using Tapatalk

  12. Top | #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Last Online
    06-01-2019 @ 02:06 PM
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    14
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    I dumped some kerosene in to clean it out but have not had a chance to run it yet , I have been waiting on a magneto since November. I am starting to wonder if they will ever get them back in stock. I sent mine to Roberts carburetor to get rebuilt and they said it was too worn out and would be cheaper to get a new one. I am still waiting on them to get the new ones In stock, its a wico xh 1042.

  13. Top | #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    06-02-2016 @ 07:30 PM
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    The wico x is pretty common and easy to find, along with repair parts. There are several on ebay. JD switched from the wico c to the x later in the production runs of the A and B.

    Sent from my GT-P5113 using Tapatalk

  14. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •