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    Rainwater

    I am thinking of putting an underground water tank at the end of my gutter and French drain pipes. my house sits above the out falls but they are at ground level approx. 100 ft from the house. The water just flows out and into the woods. I hate wasting the water and thought about sinking a 350g poly tank and just pump the water out for the garden when needed. Has anyone ever tried doing such an activity? The tank would be about 200 ft from the garden at 0 elevation change. Suggestions welcome .
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    HydroHarold's Avatar
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    I would LOVE to do an underground tank! But even before I got the BH I knew that most of this property is ledge rock and where it's not ledge it's broken up ledgerock the builder hid under the topsoil. I'll still be using my 3 55 poly barrels... but, since the house next door is now abandoned I can always pump out of the pool over there.

    This should prove to be an interesting thread!
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    Tomfive's Avatar
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    I've done a bit of thinking and research about this very subject. I just buried a couple of 125-150 foot 4" lines down the edge of my property. One is connected to my French drains, the other is connected to my downspouts. The downspout connections need more work, they connect up with corrugated, some just laying on top of my grass right now. I have an area I can break into my drain lines to fill a storage tank, I was thinking about 750-1000 gallons.

    Things that I found out and need more research to confirm/put into my design. Please don't take this as gospel, it's just what I found out so far and questions that I came up with.
    1. Buried poly storage tanks need to be designed for underground use, they must be stronger so they don't collapse when they are empty. I saw a few poly tanks at tractor supply, and on various web sites, these were for above ground use, and state on them "not for underground use". The poly tanks designed for underground use I found online were way more expensive.
    2. Burying a poly tank may not be as easy as it seems, I spoke with a construction friend I know, and he gave me some advice. If you have a high water table, or your ditch can hold water/drains slow, the tank may float up, especially if the tank is empty. Burying it deeper, you have the crushing issue. He suggested getting a concrete septic tank for water storage if I want to bury it.
    3. You can use an above ground poly tank if you put it on a good platform/footing and not backfill it, but that puts more design/expense/work into the project. And depending on the slope of your yard, you may have to set your "platform" deep enough for gravity to fill it. And if you put it in a "hole" that is not backfilled, is there a safety issue with kids and animals falling in?
    4. And some tanks have a large top opening for access/cleanout, will that have to be secured too if it is accessible (can't have inquisitive kids falling in !!!)?

    I'm not sure whether my large storage tank idea is going to be economical or not. I already have four 55 gal rainwater drums around my house. Never enough water, and 55 gals is not enough to attach a pump, and carry buckets is getting old really quick.

    So I'll be interested in the opinions / info posted here by others too.

    Just my 2 cents.
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    HydroHarold's Avatar
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    And it's not just smaller poly tanks that can "float" out of the ground. In my old neighborhood a gas station put in a couple new 2K gallon tanks, backfilled and PAVED over them before filling. They wanted to use the area for parking again right away. They both floated up through the pavement when it rained that weekend.

    I guess the concrete tank is the safest and easiest way to go in the long run, I know I would not want to spend on a water tank what I spent on my 1K gal double section poly poo tank! It sure would make a fine water tank, but definately could float in the right conditions.

    I think I'm heading towards putting all my water storage on the "blind side" of my house. I have one "official" water tank that looks like it's made of wood which I don't mind facing the street, but 2-3 blue polys lend kind of an "industrial look" to the opposite corner (no that I care when the rain quits... but... I am "married" and we all know what that can mean re. "industrial appearing" areas.)
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    I thought about doing something similar after we moved into our house until I discovered it was illegal to do so. Since Colorado is a semi-arid state, our Gummint declared many, many years ago that everything that fell from the sky was theirs. I've heard they loosened the law up a bit to allow rainwater collection barrels on gutter downspouts.
    I have more ideas than ambition.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mjncad View Post
    I thought about doing something similar after we moved into our house until I discovered it was illegal to do so. Since Colorado is a semi-arid state, our Gummint declared many, many years ago that everything that fell from the sky was theirs. I've heard they loosened the law up a bit to allow rainwater collection barrels on gutter downspouts.
    I thought Colorado was bad enough in their rules, regulations and thoughts, years ago. It sounds like they have gotten worse thru the years, not better. How can they claim to own what nature provides? No wonder I was only willing to stay there a year! This strong-willed girl doesn't like being told what she can or can't do!
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    This site is full of potable water tanks as well as septic tanks. All plastic and you can bury them. I have a 1500 gallon buried for septic on my outbuildings. When this thing showed up, trust me, you can not collapse it underground! And once it is buried, there is no chance of floating.

    Here is a link to a 2500 gallon.


    Septic Holding Tanks

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    grnspot110's Avatar
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    I put mine above ground & fenced in the one by the house:

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    Also have some behind the tool shed:

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    These are piped to the greenhouse:

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    Lowell

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    Interesting thoughts. The soil is soft enough to dig the depth needed to sink a tank myself but you all bring up good points with floating and safety. I would do it just behind the house but my wife is against big plastic barrels or tanks showing. I could run my lines another 100 ft and hit a 12 foot drop to set an above ground tank but would then need to pump up hill about 50 feet plus the 200 run to the garden. The difference in price between above ground and underground tank might make up the price in more powerful pump and lines. Either way I hate wasting rainwater. We get big downpours here in PA but might go a week or more before the next rain.
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    Senior GTT Super Slacker Gizmo2's Avatar
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    Frost can push the rounded bottom plastic tanks up also.

    What happens with all the shingle stone that ends up in the tanks?
    Keith

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