Driveway maintance(potholes) with a 2720)
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    Driveway maintance(potholes) with a 2720)

    Is a 2720 upto the task of repairing potholes in a gravel road? From what I've read I need to dig out(rip) around the potholes, fill, grade, pack and than lay new gravel and grade. Sound right? I have at my disposal a rear blade, box blade and landscape grader. Plus the 2720 with with loader and a large/heavy 8ft roller for compacting.

    Problem is anytime I've tried to use the rippers on the 2720 the tractor just spins out and my driveway is pretty hard. I have quite a few potholes and not much gravel. I've packed the potholes with gravel using the roller and it lasted most of the summer. Should I rip the whole driveway(1/2mile) or just rip the potholes individually? Not much washboard but I think the crown is gone.

    I've never had much success with the rippers on the box blade, is it me or the tractor?
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    I never,,never,,,never rip up hard packed driveway,,,,, PERIOD!

    I find some packable material, and fill the pothole, and compact the material..

    How will making the hole bigger help make the hole smaller??
    Potholes are not easy to fix,, but, IMHO,, never disturb hard driveway material.

    I do have one hole that I have been fighting for three years,, it comes,, it goes.
    I patch it, that lasts a while, sometimes the weather does not help it.
    I expect it will stay nice until some wet freezing "lifts" it,,,, again,,,,
    the hole is in a 90 degree turn,, so it is difficult.
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    Rip sometimes

    Quote Originally Posted by CADplans View Post
    I never,,never,,,never rip up hard packed driveway,,,,, PERIOD!

    I find some packable material, and fill the pothole, and compact the material..

    How will making the hole bigger help make the hole smaller??
    Potholes are not easy to fix,, but, IMHO,, never disturb hard driveway material.

    I do have one hole that I have been fighting for three years,, it comes,, it goes.
    I patch it, that lasts a while, sometimes the weather does not help it.
    I expect it will stay nice until some wet freezing "lifts" it,,,, again,,,,
    the hole is in a 90 degree turn,, so it is difficult.
    If the hole is just a hole, I agree with you. If it's crater with a raised outer edge and depressed middle, then I think ripping, leveling and repacking makes sense.

    If the drive is hard, you may need to only lower 2-3 rippers instead of all of them. There is no down pressure on the 3ph on these tractors so it's just the weight of the box blade starting the ripper into the ground. Shorten the tip link up to get an aggressive angle on the rippers and start well behind the hole. Rip all the way through and gradually raise the rippers out of the ground.

    If you have a crater, go ahead and rip enough so you are back to level ground, front and back and side to side of the crater. Then you can level and pack or better, crown and pack the road.

    I use a back blade to crown the road but you can use the box blade. Weight is important for both so they don't just skid along the top.

    Let us know how it goes.

    Treefarmer
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    I learned from an older guy who could do anything with a grader. As far as pot holes he said the only way to get rid of them permanently was to scarfire (or rip) them then fill and compact.

    The rippers on your box blade are the same thing. You just have to take as little a bite as your tractor traction will allow. Lots and lots of passes where you might only be gaining an inch at a time.

    You only want to rip to the depth of the pot hole and just a little more than the diameter.

    You have the right idea and concept - just have to learn to take a multitude of small bites.
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    Just like coal said, put your scarifiers on your shallowest setting and start there. Little at a time. Same with my land plane. Seems the first few passes just bangs along, but it will start to dig. Little bites, many passes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CADplans View Post
    I never,,never,,,never rip up hard packed driveway,,,,, PERIOD!

    I find some packable material, and fill the pothole, and compact the material..

    How will making the hole bigger help make the hole smaller??
    Potholes are not easy to fix,, but, IMHO,, never disturb hard driveway material.

    I do have one hole that I have been fighting for three years,, it comes,, it goes.
    I patch it, that lasts a while, sometimes the weather does not help it.
    I expect it will stay nice until some wet freezing "lifts" it,,,, again,,,,
    the hole is in a 90 degree turn,, so it is difficult.


    Grading box solves all of that.
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    Mabe the ground in Iowa is different from what you have to deal with but if I have a pothole that keeps coming back I will use the box blade with some but not all of the rippers down and maybe 5-6 feet before and after the pothole I do not rip up the whole driveway unless I have several potholes. The only way I have been able to remove potholes is to use the box blade with rippers down then with the rippers up then add some gravel then get rake to make it smooth then pack it down. To each his own you just have to find what works for you.

    Doug
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    Thanks guys. Last time I fixed them I filled them with road crush and tamped them by hand with a 10X10 tamper and then ran the roller over them. That was after the spring rains and they lasted all summer but we had a few rains in the fall before winter set in and now they are coming back.

    So after ripping them is road crush the best to fill them? Should I hand tamp them again or just run the roller over it. Tamping all those holes was back breaking!
    F932-gas with 72" mower deck(sold)
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    Rolling, rolling, rolling

    Quote Originally Posted by clayh View Post
    Thanks guys. Last time I fixed them I filled them with road crush and tamped them by hand with a 10X10 tamper and then ran the roller over them. That was after the spring rains and they lasted all summer but we had a few rains in the fall before winter set in and now they are coming back.

    So after ripping them is road crush the best to fill them? Should I hand tamp them again or just run the roller over it. Tamping all those holes was back breaking!
    I'm old and cranky. If I've got to hand tamp a pothole there had better be a body in there somewhere. I would spend my time getting a decent crown on the road and then rolling it to pack.

    My rule of thumb on rock is big rock for a base, smaller rock and fines to finish and top coat. Some of that depends on what is going to use the road. For a road we drive trucks over a good base is essential. The farm road we move hay bales over also needs a good base because we use it in wet weather. Pickups and cars don't need quite the same base but even then a good base goes a long way toward an easy to maintain road.

    Treefarmer
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    If you search back in the forums you will find a bunch on this (here and TBN are both really good resources for this stuff, here obviously is wonderful about our greens but additionally TBN has a ton of info by orange/red/blue/etc folk on this stuff).

    The upshot of searching on forums and looking at state extension office articles on gravel road/drive maintenance will be to learn that pretty much no matter how well you try and pack new material in, it won’t be packed quite as well as the super hard surface of the crater in the pothole. This means you will always have a “bowl” that holds moisture which softens the newly added material and makes it susceptible to ejection. When you add freezing/thawing of that new wetter material then you can see why a pothole filled in this manner will always be more likely to come back.

    You want to dig out that hardened shell, re-insert it mixed with new material, and then tamp it all down to the same packedness (is that a word? it is now) as the rest of the surrounding road. Anything will work here: FEL w/ teeth, pickaxe, backhoe, box blade/grader w/ teeth... anything. I use my backhoe and just loosen/dig a 3ft by 3ft by 4”(ish, probably could be half that depth) area. I mix in a bit of new gravel, shovel it around a bit, and then hand tamp it all back down. Personally I then rerun my whole drive (It’s fast and easy with a Land Plane... can’t recommend one highly enough if you have a longish drive), and then tamp the whole thing again. This way you can’t see what I did (since everything is fresh), and it’s one more step in making sure the drive isn’t left with hard or soft spots.

    A roller would be best for giving things a final tamping, but I don’t have one. You can run up/down the drive with a fully loaded FEL that is mostly sitting on the ground (some tension, mostly resting on the ground) with the lip 1-2” elevated. The heavy bucket and shallow angle of the bottom really flattens things down, but will wear on the bottom. You can also just drive carefully up and down with a heavy car and make sure you cover the drive fully with tracks. I do the first down the center (my drive is too narrow to get the car tires down the center), and then use a heavy SUV for the rest (to limit wear on the bottom of the bucket).

    Good luck =)
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