Grub Control Products, What and How to Apply, What doesn't Work
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    SulleyBear's Avatar
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    Grub Control Products, What and How to Apply, What doesn't Work

    Here is a very good article from the Michigan State University Agricultural Extension Office, on the proper uses of Grub Control products to help prevent moles and all the destruction they can bring. Click on the link to see the full article and details.


    How to choose and when to apply grub control products for your lawn | MSU Extension



    One thing I wanted to specifically highlight here is the results of a test which found one of the most commonly sold grub control products is a complete failure at dealing with and killing / preventing grubs. This is in the article as well, but I have copied and pasted it here for quick reference to bring attention to this matter.

    Please note that the ground temperature is very important in the effectiveness of applied Grub Control products. Normally, in our area, the ground temps would be where they should be by this time of the year, but this year the actual ground temps are about 12 degrees lower than they typically are this time of year, so it's important to be aware of ground temps when using these products.

    ""There is a widely sold trade name called Triazicide from Spectrum that lists grubs on the label and states it will control insects above or below ground and has a picture of a grub on the front of the bag. It contains only lambda-cyhalothrin or gamma-cyhalothrin. Triazicide will not control grubs. Carefully check the label for ingredients.""

    3) Insecticides that DO NOT work on grubs

    Do not use products containing ONLY lambda-cyhalothrin, gamma-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, deltamethrin, cyfluthrin or permethrin for grub control. Products containing only these ingredients will not work for grub control because the active ingredient binds with organic material and will not move down to where the grubs are feeding. These products work well for above-ground feeding insects that live on the grass leaves or soil surface, but not for insects that feed on the roots. At one garden center a clerk showed us two products, one containing only permethrin and one containing only bifenthrin, when we asked for products to control grubs. Neither of the products listed grubs on the label printed on the bag and neither of the products would have controlled grubs.


    There are several products on the market that contain a combination of one of the preventive compounds and one of the above listed insecticides that “do not work on grubs.” The preventive ingredient will make it an effective choice for grub control.

    Do NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON THIS PRODUCT
    if your goal is Grub control


    I have also seen this same product in a RED Bag with Green Highlights, just the opposite coloring of this bag.........


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    Good timing Sully! I was just on my deck this morning and thinking "I wonder if it's the right time to apply some grub control?". HONEST, I was!!

    Just out of curiosity, what do you buy and use?

    Can you come down this way and do something about those stupid moles in my (and all my neighbors) yard?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark02tj View Post
    Good timing Sully! I was just on my deck this morning and thinking "I wonder if it's the right time to apply some grub control?". HONEST, I was!!

    Just out of curiosity, what do you buy and use?

    Can you come down this way and do something about those stupid moles in my (and all my neighbors) yard?
    X2... I would be interested to see a list of products that DO work.
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    from the listed link, and posted by a beekeeper "Protecting bees and other pollinators. If you are applying a product containing clothianidin, thiamethoxam or imidacloprid, the lawn should be mowed prior to the application so that no weeds are flowering in the lawn when the insecticide is applied. These active ingredients can be toxic to bees if the bees visit flowers that were recently sprayed. Mowing prior to making the application will avoid this problem by removing the flowers. Weeds that flower again after mowing will not have the chemical directly on the flowers and are much safer for the bees. If there is nothing flowering in the lawn, there is nothing in it that would attract bees. In addition, grub control products that contain the active ingredient chlorantraniliprole are safe for bees, even when weed flowers are sprayed. Finally, avoid spray drift or granular spreader drift to flower beds when applying thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, clothianidin or any insecticide for grubs other than chlorantraniliprole " always follow instruction
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    interesting they only list hard chemicals for control, this is what I used many years ago, and never had a problem after that. Is more expensive, but no need to reapply every year. just one link many others.

    https://www.domyown.com/milky-spore-...s-pq-2948.html


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    Great timing for this thread!
    It should be revisited around early June too!

    I tried that stuff they said not to use, and it certainly doesnt work.
    The only thing Ive had luck with is Merit. I buy it from a local seed company, and a bag usually gets me two applications (one per year).

    Timing is everything, and I might not be the best at that, as I still end up with grubs, and the moles that come to eat them.
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    My sister's farm was over-run with japanese beetles back in the 1950's

    They treated the farm (2,000 acres) with milky spore,,

    Instantly (within two years) the grubs were gone, and are still gone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbranch2007 View Post
    interesting they only list hard chemicals for control, this is what I used many years ago, and never had a problem after that. Is more expensive, but no need to reapply every year. just one link many others.

    https://www.domyown.com/milky-spore-...s-pq-2948.html


    I was going to mention milky spore. My father has had excellent luck with this and if the soil is not disturbed, as you mentioned, it is more or less forever. He has a small yard, but treated with milky spore, he actually observed mole tunnels that make u-turns when they get to his property line! I just have no clue what it would cost to do an acre in milky spore.

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    I forgot about milky spore!
    Ive read quite a bit of good stuff about it, and the once applied, its good basically forever if not disturbed makes it very attractive. That and the fact that it doesnt hurt desirable stuff too.
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    Milky spore only works against Japanese beetle grubs. In a suburban upstate NY community where we lived for many years, the majority of the grubs were European chafers. Sevin applied in the fall seemed to work best. A lot of the effectiveness of controls depends on local climate.See this.

    Al
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