Poison ivy in 5 acre field
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    Poison ivy in 5 acre field

    A relative bought a small farm last year with a 5 acre field. Poison ivy is everywhere. They mowed it last year and it came back in spades.

    How can you get rid of this much poison ivy? I have read about roundup for Poison Ivy but that's a lot of Roundup and alot of spraying.

    thanks

    C.R. Sides
    Last edited by crsides; 06-16-2018 at 11:25 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by crsides View Post
    A relative bought a small farm last year with a 5 acre field. Poison ivy is everywhere. They mowed it last year and it came back in spades.

    How can you get rid of this much poison ivy? I have read about roundup for Poison Ivy but that's a lot of Roundup and alot of spraying.

    thanks

    C.R. Sides
    We have almost 5 acres, and MEC Amine-D will work just fine.

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    Find someone with a LOT of goats and set them loose on it. Once they knock it down, clear the goats out and get in there and spray.

    If it is that infested there is no easy way to attack it. I get a little of it growing in my back yard and I can mark it and then dig it out come fall when it goes dormant but I don't think there is any way to control that much of it through that process. Sounds like it needs an all-out frontal attack.
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    356
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    Quote Originally Posted by crsides View Post
    A relative bought a small farm last year with a 5 acre field. Poison ivy is everywhere. They mowed it last year and it came back in spades.

    How can you get rid of this much poison ivy? I have read about roundup for Poison Ivy but that's a lot of Roundup and alot of spraying.

    thanks

    C.R. Sides
    I have about 3 acres of poison ivy on our current property, and had about the same on another property....the upside is that deer and game birds love it. Our conservation officer said it would be best to leave it, so I did, and will be putting a deer stand over the field for early season hunting.

    If you need to remove it, control is best achieved while the plants are flowering (May - July here in Missouri). Glyphosate works well during this period, and is cheap. It is not unusual to have to use a second or third application. For vines along fence rows and trees, cut and spray the stump. 6-12 ounces of 41% Glyphosate per gallon is the recommended ratio for poison ivy (Georgia Extension office). This is higher than typically used for grass and weed kills.

    The "organic" solution is cutting it down. Poison ivy does not tolerate repeated cutting or mowing. Mow short and mow often. Or you can till the area, then treat the new sprouts, then come back and seed with something you want. Continually cutting poison ivy short will eventually (years) bring it under control.

    Poison Ivy is a pain (I am just recovering from a bad rash over 1/3 of my body), but it is not an invasive species, which his something to be thankful for!
    Last edited by 356; 06-17-2018 at 07:08 AM.
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    Just leave it be. A lot of wild life, like deer can and will eat it. We have a lot of poison ivy on our up north property. It hasn’t been much of a problem for us. We do spray it with 2 4d near the buildings when we notice it .
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    Spray sticker

    Quote Originally Posted by 356 View Post
    I have about 3 acres of poison ivy on our current property, and had about the same on another property....the upside is that deer and game birds love it. Our conservation officer said it would be best to leave it, so I did, and will be putting a deer stand over the field for early season hunting.

    If you need to remove it, control is best achieved while the plants are flowering (May - July here in Missouri). Glyphosate works well during this period, and is cheap. It is not unusual to have to use a second or third application. For vines along fence rows and trees, cut and spray the stump. 6-12 ounces of 41% Glyphosate per gallon is the recommended ratio for poison ivy (Georgia Extension office). This is higher than typically used for grass and weed kills.

    The "organic" solution is cutting it down. Poison ivy does not tolerate repeated cutting or mowing. Mow short and mow often. Or you can till the area, then treat the new sprouts, then come back and seed with something you want. Continually cutting poison ivy short will eventually (years) bring it under control.

    Poison Ivy is a pain (I am just recovering from a bad rash over 1/3 of my body), but it is not an invasive species, which his something to be thankful for!
    With the shiny leaves, spray doesn't "stick" well so I would recommend using a spray sticker which is usually just a soap variation. For this instance, I would pay for a commercial product.

    If you have grass you want to keep, use 2,4,d instead of glyphosate but again use a sticker. Given a bad infestation, you are likely going to need multiple applications as new plants arise. Neither glyphosate or 2,4,d has a residual germination inhibitor they only kill what they hit and then only if the plant is actively growing. Don't bother spraying in the middle of a drought, it's a waste of time and money.

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    356
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    With the shiny leaves, spray doesn't "stick" well so I would recommend using a spray sticker which is usually just a soap variation. For this instance, I would pay for a commercial product.

    If you have grass you want to keep, use 2,4,d instead of glyphosate but again use a sticker. Given a bad infestation, you are likely going to need multiple applications as new plants arise. Neither glyphosate or 2,4,d has a residual germination inhibitor they only kill what they hit and then only if the plant is actively growing. Don't bother spraying in the middle of a drought, it's a waste of time and money.

    Treefarmer
    Threefarmer is right! You must use a surfactant to get the chemicals to adhere to the plants. I've never heard it called a "sticker" but I like that term. The plants must also be actively growing.

    Here is the surfactant product I use when mixing glyphosate. This company has gotten a lot of my money in the past year (see posts on my carpenter bee battle), and has great customer service. It's also available in every farm store. Although dish soap is a surfactant, some ag agencies (and our Missouri Private Forester) believe the soap might negatively interact with the herbicide. I used soap until this past year, but believe the burn is noticeably better using the commercial surfactant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 356 View Post
    Threefarmer is right! You must use a surfactant to get the chemicals to adhere to the plants. I've never heard it called a "sticker" but I like that term. The plants must also be actively growing.

    . Although dish soap is a surfactant, some ag agencies (and our Missouri Private Forester) believe the soap might negatively interact with the herbicide.

    I used soap until this past year, but believe the burn is noticeably better using the commercial surfactant.
    Times have changed, but,, surfactants,,Hmmmmmm,,

    We used it in Virginia,, in the 1970's,, and called it "sticker"

    The farm had it delivered in a 55 gallon steel drum,, guess what company sold it to us??

    AMWAY!!,,
    I would bet it was dish washing soap,
    It was clear, and unscented,, but, it would also wash anything,,,

    I have three favorite "stickers", and use which ever happens to be in the shed at the time,,,

    1) purple cleaner,, any of them, they are all great surface tension breakers,,,
    2) Greased Lightning,, I buy that in 5 gallon jugs at Lowes,, works great.
    3) Dawn dish-washing liquid,, I get it in half gallons at Sams Club

    I see a great benefit from using any of them,,,
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    goats, and sheep will also eat it.
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    It could always be worse

    We've recently been blessed to have some Giant Hogweed show up in Virginia. It makes poison ivy seem tame by comparison.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/giant-h...-other-states/

    Treefarmer
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