Tordon in Winter
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Thread: Tordon in Winter

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    lost in wisconsin's Avatar
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    Tordon in Winter

    In another thread, Tordon was mentioned as an effective way to permanently eliminate unwanted bushes. Whereas I agree with this and have had much success, I am curious to whether others have used it in winter as these bushes go dormant.

    We live in SE Wisconsin and have been lucky enough to not have any measurable snow on the ground thus far. This has created a good opportunity for us to clean up these unwanted intruders on the weekends. I usually go around and cut buckthorn, honeysuckle, etc about a foot off the ground. After I have gone in and cleaned up what I have cut down and brought to the burn pile, I follow up with an old blade on my chain saw and get as close to the ground as I can. If I am alone, I will do around 6-8 at a time and then follow up with brushing the Tordon on the stump. If my bride is with me, she just follows up behind me.

    Then my further question regarding Tordon is when one might allow horses in that area where it was applied. I think I may already know this answer and thus change my current method to pulling them out vs using Tordon.


    Thanks in advance for your feedback.
    PJR832 likes this.
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    I can't answer your questions re: Tordon in the winter and when it's safe to release horses into that area. But, your comment about changing your eradication method over to pulling out the honeysuckle and buckthorn caught my eye.

    I am inundated with honeysuckle on my 5 acres and I also have a bit of what I think is buckthorn. I've looked into just about every method of getting rid of it and they all have their drawbacks. I'd certainly be interested in knowing how you're planning on approaching this. I'll be happy to throw my $.02 in as well, if you're interested.


    Hopefully others chime in with the information you're wanting on the Tordon.
    PJR832 likes this.
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    Winter and tordon

    Quote Originally Posted by lost in wisconsin View Post
    In another thread, Tordon was mentioned as an effective way to permanently eliminate unwanted bushes. Whereas I agree with this and have had much success, I am curious to whether others have used it in winter as these bushes go dormant.

    We live in SE Wisconsin and have been lucky enough to not have any measurable snow on the ground thus far. This has created a good opportunity for us to clean up these unwanted intruders on the weekends. I usually go around and cut buckthorn, honeysuckle, etc about a foot off the ground. After I have gone in and cleaned up what I have cut down and brought to the burn pile, I follow up with an old blade on my chain saw and get as close to the ground as I can. If I am alone, I will do around 6-8 at a time and then follow up with brushing the Tordon on the stump. If my bride is with me, she just follows up behind me.

    Then my further question regarding Tordon is when one might allow horses in that area where it was applied. I think I may already know this answer and thus change my current method to pulling them out vs using Tordon.


    Thanks in advance for your feedback.
    I don't remember using tordon in extremely cold weather but have used in our late fall right around leaf drop. It's actually pretty effective then as it seems to be sucked into the roots as part of the natural cycle.

    If you aren't using RTU I would mix it with kerosene or diesel instead of water so you don't have freezing issue. I have no idea about horses but it should be on the label. I've only used it to treat stumps and hack and squirt on smaller trees. Either way, it's been pretty effective.

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    buckteeth445's Avatar
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    It works great even in winter. If you’re worried about livestock cut as low as you can, apply tordon and heap some dirt over it. Tordon dries pretty fast.

    I use a small disposable art brush to apply it. Also, wear latex gloves when you handle that stuff.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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