Trench drain into a basin?
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    mjarmstr's Avatar
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    Trench drain into a basin?

    The concrete slab on my garage slopes away from the house and the gravel part of my driveway slopes down toward the house. The result? The end of the slab gets covered in gravel particles and dirt whenever we get a good rain/snow run-off and the end of the slab is always wet and dirty.

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    I'm thinking this collecting of water has contributed to the early demise of the slab. We are looking to replace it this summer and I would like to fix the water/dirt problem while I'm at it. I'm thinking of putting a trench drain at the end of the slab and running that into a tile line to drain down the hill. However, I'm concerned with the gravel and dirt being carried down into and clogging the tile line. The one I'm looking to tie into terminates into the gravel field behind a retaining wall which drains into another tile line. Any suggestions for handling this? I was thinking about running the drain into a catch basin before the tile line that I can take the lid off and clean out occasionally, but the ones I've seen at the store aren't very deep and I'm wondering if the volume of water necessary to carry gravel down the hill will just carry it right through the basin. And if I were to get one deep enough would I just end up with a mosquito breading ground instead.

    Also how well do the plastic grates that the trench drains come with hold up to traffic?

    Thoughts? Other options?
    - Mike

    2014 1025R

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    I'd check and see what your local precast concrete vendors have available. They make some boxes that are roughly 3' square with inlet and outlet. The outlet is setup so that it's about 1' up off the bottom. That might allow some dirt into your outlet pipe in a really heavy storm but gravel will just sink to the bottom.
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    RandyM's Avatar
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    My drains came with cast steel grates. They didn't work out very well because they were installed on an incline. I found a welded stainless steel option that works much better. If you install the grates flat or at your low point you'll not have that problem.
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    As mentioned earlier you want to visit you concrete contractor supplier.the plastic grate trench drains home depot or lowes sells are just for landscaping and would most likely fail with the weight of a car.. the commercial ones are ductile iron or stainless grate.rated for forklift traffic.you can get a integral catch basin that goes at the end of the trench drain if needed..
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    I would think twice before dumping any more water behind that retaining wall. Could cause more issues down the road. Any silt, etc washed into the gravel field could clog it up & cause it to not drain as designed. It would be best to tee it into the drain line downstream from the retaining wall.

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    That's a tough and annoying; but not insurmountable problem.

    Any trench drain has the potential to clog. If you go the trench drain route, I'd think about putting the drain at the low point per your plan; but when you replace the slab, I'd pour an extension 4' - 8' on the other side of the drain for the gravel to collect on before getting to the drain.

    As others have said, check building supply houses that cater to the trades for cast iron grates. You could also use floor grating that is commonly found in refineries, power plants, etc. Some of it has vehicle ratings for heavy trucks.

    The outfall to the detention pond area could be lined in rip-rap or other heavy rock to break up the flow of water. The downside to rip-rap is that it's a pain in the ass to keep unwanted vegetation from growing between the rocks. That's where Round-Up becomes your friend.
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    I have more ideas than ambition.


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    RandyM's Avatar
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    Here is mine being installed. Don't have any pics of it finished, I'll have to get some.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Driveway Drain - 1.JPG   Driveway Drain - 2.JPG   Driveway Drain - 3.JPG  
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    mjarmstr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by powerline View Post
    As mentioned earlier you want to visit you concrete contractor supplier.the plastic grate trench drains home depot or lowes sells are just for landscaping and would most likely fail with the weight of a car.. the commercial ones are ductile iron or stainless grate.rated for forklift traffic.you can get a integral catch basin that goes at the end of the trench drain if needed..
    The ones I was looking at say they are rated for vehicles, but I was skeptical.
    - Mike

    2014 1025R

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    mjarmstr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom N OH View Post
    I would think twice before dumping any more water behind that retaining wall. Could cause more issues down the road. Any silt, etc washed into the gravel field could clog it up & cause it to not drain as designed. It would be best to tee it into the drain line downstream from the retaining wall.
    I agree this is probably the correct solution, just means a lot longer tile run I have to put in to get around the retaining wall.....
    - Mike

    2014 1025R

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    mjarmstr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjncad View Post
    ...pain in the ass to keep unwanted vegetation from growing between the rocks. That's where Round-Up becomes your friend.
    The picture doesn't show it well, but there are some landscaping rocks next to the driveway that are full of the collected sediment from the driveway. I pulled them all out and washed them a couple of years ago. Took all of 2 months before they were full and growing grass again.
    - Mike

    2014 1025R

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