Spreading wet clay dug from pond?
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    Spreading wet clay dug from pond?

    Getting ready to have a 1/4 acre pond dug on my property and excavator states he will be piling the material (mostly clay w/ a little loam) along 3 of the banks. He says will have to wait 2 months or so for the clay to dry out to be spread properly and would be a separate charge (of course). My question is: with my 1023E, how reasonable is it to attempt to spread the material myself with my bucket and box blade? Any other implement better for spreading clay? My thought is to scoop and spread/dump piles all over the yard to promote faster drying, then go back and grade it out... But not having spread clay before, I'm wondering if it's worth the fee to have the dozer back for a day? What are your experiences (good & bad) with spreading clay? Thanks for the help!
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    Pay the man!

    A 1/4 acre pond = 400+ cubic yards of material for each foot of pond depth (i.e. 1 ft deep = 400 cubic yards, 2 ft deep = 800 cubic yards, 3 ft deep = 1200 cubic yards, etc...).

    Will your tractor move it? Sure. But how many years do you have to work on it to get that done? If you have a standard 54" bucket, it holds 1/6th of a cubic yard.
    Last edited by JimR; 05-19-2019 at 11:40 AM.
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    X2.

    You'll have plenty to do with your tractor after it is spread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimR View Post
    Pay the man!

    A 1/4 acre pond = 400+ cubic yards of material for each foot of pond depth (i.e. 1 ft deep = 400 cubic yards, 2 ft deep = 800 cubic yards, 3 ft deep = 1200 cubic yards, etc...).

    Will your tractor move it? Sure. But how many years do you have to work on it to get that done? If you have a standard 54" bucket, it holds 1/6th of a cubic yard.
    Quote Originally Posted by rtgt View Post
    X2.

    You'll have plenty to do with your tractor after it is spread.

    Sound advice on both counts.
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    I would suggest hiring a manure hauling business to move with a spreader truck.
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    Hmmm... I'm sensing that I should just pay the guy...

    I still may try to spread some of it myself to aid in drying faster. I am not wild about giant piles of dirt sitting there waiting to air out (especially with the wet weather we've had so far!). I also am somewhat concerned about erosion back into the pond from the piles - I reckon some silt fence may solve that though.

    Thanks for the input!
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    Turn it into a landscape feature

    You might think a little about what else you can do with all that material, instead of just spreading it out. Do you want an elevated area in the yard or some other feature? What about a privacy berm between you and the road or an elevated walking path?

    If you do spread it, you might want to time it for fall grass seeding.

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    I was spreading clay this weekend and have been off and on for the past two years. I am slowly taking care of the debris pile left by the guy who cleared 2 acres for so we could build our house. I started this project with a 2210 SCUT but I traded it in on a 3025E. My debris pile also has trees in it to complicate things so I have used my grapple much more than my bucket earlier in the project but am using the bucket more and more now.

    Clay, at least the stuff I have, dries out pretty fast if you spread it out. If you trying to dig into the pile to spread it, the outside part of it will probably dry up pretty quick and be hard. I would recommend a tooth bar to make life a little easier. I need one and I have a 3E series tractor which has more weight to it than your 1 series.

    As others have said, it will take a long time to reduce the pile based on the estimated amount of dirt removed for the pond. If there isn't any woody debris in it then it should spread out on the yard pretty easy. You can grade it out by back dragging your bucket and then come back with a box blade or land plane once it dries out to really make it smooth.

    If you don't need the dirt consider having it hauled off of course there is a cost unless you happen to find someone who needs fill dirt.....and has a truck or dump trailer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69project View Post
    If you don't need the dirt consider having it hauled off of course there is a cost unless you happen to find someone who needs fill dirt.....and has a truck or dump trailer.
    Good clean fill dirt is worth some $. No need to pay someone to haul it off. Sell it.

    I have seen a few places where a company will dig a pond for free. Catch is, they keep the dirt.


    Nothing wrong getting in some seat time playing with the dirt. But when your ready and it is dry(er) a dozer will make short work of it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtgt View Post
    Good clean fill dirt is worth some $. No need to pay someone to haul it off. Sell it.

    I have seen a few places where a company will dig a pond for free. Catch is, they keep the dirt.


    Nothing wrong getting in some seat time playing with the dirt. But when your ready and it is dry(er) a dozer will make short work of it.


    very common around here to dig a pond for free.....for the topsoil ....and the fill dirt.....
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