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  1. Top | #11

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    Virginia fence law

    Quote Originally Posted by arlen View Post
    You didn’t have to spring for 1/2 the fence? In Minnesota both property owners are responsible.
    Quote Originally Posted by toymaker View Post
    Good point on the above post.

    TYPICALLY - a border fence is "joint responsibility" and ownership. Since both parties benefit from it, both potentially owe equally cost of building and maintenance.

    Big exception is when one party can PROVE no benefit. Then they don't owe...but unless your property has no foreseeable use as pasture, that's hard to prove - even if you don't presently use it for pasture.

    Locust split post can last ALONG time.. I have no doubt most of what is out there now date to 50/60s. The wire has long since rusted away...but some post remain standing. It's time to just rebuild it all and start fresh though.

    Like I've said, I'm no better or worse a person for not wanting land to go to waste. It's simply doing for someone what someone did years ago for my father and grandfather...and theirs before them. Somewhere along the line someone helped them get started. When the time came, they turned things over to the next generation.

    Sometimes things change. My father didn't farm full time - but he still enjoyed it. I like to think I could, but I'm realistic enough to know the best play is ensure independence financially for my family - then take on "passion projects".

    Till then, doesn't hurt to help someone else out.
    If you want your head to hurt, try looking at Virginia fence laws. We have "fence in" and "fence out" counties and responsibility varies depending on which county you are in. However, if both parties share a line fence, cost is shared but there are limitations on that. One revision in the law was the result of a case 3 counties over where a man was actually killed because of a fence dispute.

    As a kid, all our posts were either farm cut cedar or locust, hand split or used intact. Some of those are still in use 50-60 years later but trust me, you don't want to drive a staple in the locust posts now. Unfortunately, the locust we have growing now seems to grow a little quicker and doesn't last as well. The last few fences we've put in used pressure treated posts. Lots easier to drive staples and quicker to get a bundle of posts than cut down the appropriate number of trees. Actually most of our fences are now tending toward a combination of wood and metal T posts with wood on the corners and braces and every third line post with T posts in between. That's fine with barbed or electric fence. If we have an all smooth high tensile fence, the cows will gradually push the T' posts over and make them lean just by rubbing on them.

    I'm a few years ahead of you on the farming curve. My father and grandfather were full time farmers. I left the farm for a full time job but have kept my hand in on a limited basis but since I'm now looking at retirement, I'd like to up my time and effort on the farm. One big job that needs doing is rebuilding quite a bit of fence and while I'm still physically able to do most things, I can't work like I did 30 years ago so things I would have done then by hand will require equipment now. A good fence contractor can put up a fence quicker and better than I can. It will just cost a lot more. A sorry fence contractor can put up a fence quicker but it won't be a good fence and it will still cost more.

    If you find the right young person to work with, I feel comfortable saying the money will work out.

    Treefarmer
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  3. Top | #12
    Zebrafive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arlen View Post
    You didn’t have to spring for 1/2 the fence? In Minnesota both property owners are responsible.
    I was never asked or demanded to cost share.
    The previous owner told me it used to be cost share if both owners had livestock
    Last edited by Zebrafive; 07-27-2019 at 11:19 AM.
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  5. Top | #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    If you want your head to hurt, try looking at Virginia fence laws. We have "fence in" and "fence out" counties and responsibility varies depending on which county you are in. However, if both parties share a line fence, cost is shared but there are limitations on that. One revision in the law was the result of a case 3 counties over where a man was actually killed because of a fence dispute.

    As a kid, all our posts were either farm cut cedar or locust, hand split or used intact. Some of those are still in use 50-60 years later but trust me, you don't want to drive a staple in the locust posts now. Unfortunately, the locust we have growing now seems to grow a little quicker and doesn't last as well. The last few fences we've put in used pressure treated posts. Lots easier to drive staples and quicker to get a bundle of posts than cut down the appropriate number of trees. Actually most of our fences are now tending toward a combination of wood and metal T posts with wood on the corners and braces and every third line post with T posts in between. That's fine with barbed or electric fence. If we have an all smooth high tensile fence, the cows will gradually push the T' posts over and make them lean just by rubbing on them.

    I'm a few years ahead of you on the farming curve. My father and grandfather were full time farmers. I left the farm for a full time job but have kept my hand in on a limited basis but since I'm now looking at retirement, I'd like to up my time and effort on the farm. One big job that needs doing is rebuilding quite a bit of fence and while I'm still physically able to do most things, I can't work like I did 30 years ago so things I would have done then by hand will require equipment now. A good fence contractor can put up a fence quicker and better than I can. It will just cost a lot more. A sorry fence contractor can put up a fence quicker but it won't be a good fence and it will still cost more.

    If you find the right young person to work with, I feel comfortable saying the money will work out.

    Treefarmer
    The fence was contractor installed. Treated posts, tractor 3PT mounted post pounder. Corners got bigger posts and a galvanized pipe top brace with diagonal high tensile wire twisted to hold it together. Five stands of high tensile wire all "hot". Ratchet tighteners. Insulating plastic tubes on every wire at every post.
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  7. Top | #14

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    Sounds like a good fence

    Quote Originally Posted by Zebrafive View Post
    The fence was contractor installed. Treated posts, tractor 3PT mounted post pounder. Corners got bigger posts and a galvanized pipe top brace with diagonal high tensile wire twisted to hold it together. Five stands of high tensile wire all "hot". Ratchet tighteners. Insulating plastic tubes on every wire at every post.
    LOL, send that contractor my way. I probably can't afford them but it sounds like a good fence. I do have a quirk of liking to leave the bottom wire not hot and grounded so cows can graze right under the fence but as soon as they try to push through they get a really good jolt. That's just a personal preference, not many others do that.

    I don't mind running high tensile smooth wire in the open but it's a pain around most of where we have fences because of trees. One branch coming down can short it out and then our cows figure out that they can just step over the low spot. As nasty as it is to work with, I'm actually replacing some smooth wire with barbed. Sometimes it's a combo with 2-3 strands of smooth hot high tensile and 2-3 strands of grounded barbed wire. That's ok on cows, not acceptable at all with horses.

    Treefarmer
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  8. Top | #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    LOL, send that contractor my way. I probably can't afford them but it sounds like a good fence. I do have a quirk of liking to leave the bottom wire not hot and grounded so cows can graze right under the fence but as soon as they try to push through they get a really good jolt. That's just a personal preference, not many others do that.

    I don't mind running high tensile smooth wire in the open but it's a pain around most of where we have fences because of trees. One branch coming down can short it out and then our cows figure out that they can just step over the low spot. As nasty as it is to work with, I'm actually replacing some smooth wire with barbed. Sometimes it's a combo with 2-3 strands of smooth hot high tensile and 2-3 strands of grounded barbed wire. That's ok on cows, not acceptable at all with horses.

    Treefarmer
    I had a fence installed 3 or 4 years ago just like the one Zebra described...it was $2.60 per foot
    Last edited by arlen; 07-27-2019 at 05:26 PM.
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    I was letting my neighbor's sheep graze for free on our land because we could claim an ag exemption for all but one acre (where the house was.) Then we started with a blackbuck antelope herd. Most fencing around here is net fencing for sheep and goats, I think my neighbor and I paid about $3.50 or $4 a foot for a five foot tall net fence - 2" pipe every xx feet and T posts. Some use cedar posts but cedar will burn in a wildfire or a prescribed burn that's out of control.

    Best of luck for your operation and make good use of your county extension (or ag) agent, you are paying for them through taxes wether you use them or not .
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    Quote Originally Posted by toymaker View Post
    Ok, so here's the situation.

    I have approximately 100 acres of land that's part of a family farm I've inherited. About half of that is open pasture.

    I have no interest in selling, but also have no interest in actively farming it - I've got a full time job that pays better, is steadier and is in general enough to keep me busy.

    At the same time, I hate to see land going unused and things deteriorating. This was the family farm for a few generations - but hasn't actively been farmed in a solid decade. Fences are now in need of replacement - barn is still solid though - and the remaining half the land is woods with plenty to offer for firewood and fence post to someone able to work it.

    My plan is working with the right person to clean up some things, working the woods in exchange for part of the post and then hiring out someone to install fence with goal of renting out pasture next spring.

    My question is, what's going rate on pasture ground these days. I understand it varies regionally - but with beef being the primary livestock locally - I'm expecting that's where the most interest would lie. Might do some smaller sections around barn in woven wire for horses - then larger lots on barbed wire for cattle spring through fall.

    Not looking to "profit" from this venture, and really not expecting to. Property tax/insurance are the same if I grow anything or let it sit untouched. The only cost I'd have is the fence and is I can source post cheap enough - could save some $$ there. At the same time - if I lay out cash for labor/materials - I reasonably need to see a return of my investment within 5-8 years I think to make it worthwhile.

    Assuming 20k to fence it all, that's 3-5k a year. And I'm worried 20k may be low. 50 acres for 5k sound reasonable? Figured fence is good for 10 years minimum - and if lessor allows me to put a couple of head in myself for personal beef and maintain fence, it's a win-win. Again - horse owners would probably pay more...but cost of fencing is going to be higher.
    Not sure where this land is, but if your not interested in ranching, plant pine trees and harvest them in 15 years. Most guys i've seen lease for free in return they keep up fence and keep up the land.
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    Around here you can rent out tillable land for $100sh per acre. You can get more or less , it kinda depends on how good the ground is. I have a couple of huge dairy farms near me. They tend to get into bidding wars for land to rent. I donít understand why they donít just buy the land. But they rent more than the actually own.

    For the most part the farmers around here donít pasture cattle. The farm nearest me supposedly milks over 3,000 cows. But I seldom see any the cows. They are inside barns 24/7.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ejb69 View Post
    Around here you can rent out tillable land for $100sh per acre. You can get more or less , it kinda depends on how good the ground is. I have a couple of huge dairy farms near me. They tend to get into bidding wars for land to rent. I donít understand why they donít just buy the land. But they rent more than the actually own.

    For the most part the farmers around here donít pasture cattle. The farm nearest me supposedly milks over 3,000 cows. But I seldom see any the cows. They are inside barns 24/7.
    Because they have to be milked twice a day...

    The ones you'll see in pastures are beef cattle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cutty72 View Post
    Because they have to be milked twice a day...

    The ones you'll see in pastures are beef cattle.
    Not in this area. The cows have an internal timer and line up at the barn door at milking time. They also only have tens or hundreds, not thousands.

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