Fence posts - Cement/Concrete or foam stuff
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    Fence posts - Cement/Concrete or foam stuff

    I don't wish to quibble between concrete or cement

    Quickrete vs Foam

    These will be most likely 4" round posts (3.75" nominal) in 6" holes - I may do 4x4 in 9" holes for certain parts but certainly not the large majority

    I am leaning towards quickrete cause it is just what I know
    Foam doesn't seem that much cheaper if at all
    Foam will be sitting in wet ass clay - I live in the low country - you go down 2 ft, you hit water - dunno how that will work long term

    We are talking roughly 2500 linear feet of fencing
    Charleston, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hipplewm View Post
    I don't wish to quibble between concrete or cement

    Quickrete vs Foam

    These will be most likely 4" round posts (3.75" nominal) in 6" holes - I may do 4x4 in 9" holes for certain parts but certainly not the large majority

    I am leaning towards quickrete cause it is just what I know
    Foam doesn't seem that much cheaper if at all
    Foam will be sitting in wet ass clay - I live in the low country - you go down 2 ft, you hit water - dunno how that will work long term

    We are talking roughly 2500 linear feet of fencing
    I would use 3/4 minus gravel and tamp it good. Pressure treated posts rot out quicker when placed in concrete!
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    Agree with the gravel. Use a ton of water when you tamp. I set eight 12' 6x6 posts for my composter in gravel. I bumped it with the 2032R almost immediately, it didn't even move.

    The gravel will drain, the concrete and foam will not.
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    i usually put dry post mix in bottom half of hole.....then wet and tamp in gravel up to top
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    Plain old dirt

    99% of the fence posts I've put in don't have anything but very well tamped dirt around them. Very, very occasionally I've used something else but normally it's all dirt from the hole put back in the space but tamped very well. If the post is adequately sized and the hole is appropriately deep, that's all that is required in our area. It does mean taking the time to tamp the fill dirt all the way from top to bottom, which can be slower than simply dumping some quick crete in the hole.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    99% of the fence posts I've put in don't have anything but very well tamped dirt around them. Very, very occasionally I've used something else but normally it's all dirt from the hole put back in the space but tamped very well. If the post is adequately sized and the hole is appropriately deep, that's all that is required in our area. It does mean taking the time to tamp the fill dirt all the way from top to bottom, which can be slower than simply dumping some quick crete in the hole.

    Treefarmer
    This is how I set all of mine too. So far, so good.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubber View Post
    This is how I set all of mine too. So far, so good.
    I did all my wood posts this way too. 4’ in the ground tamped dirt bottom to top, they’re not going anywhere easily.
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    i need to revise my previous statement.......fence posts of any size wood or steel we use hydraulic pounder to drive them.....the previous statement applies to poles and posts to tall to use a hydraulic hammer on......if you have enough i would think it would be worth considering renting a driver..or haveing them drove for you since this is the common way these days at least in our area.....i think 2500ft would be well worth the pounder option....i see adds on craigslist in our area for post driving per post all the time
    Last edited by ttazzman; 08-02-2019 at 10:56 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    99% of the fence posts I've put in don't have anything but very well tamped dirt around them. Very, very occasionally I've used something else but normally it's all dirt from the hole put back in the space but tamped very well. If the post is adequately sized and the hole is appropriately deep, that's all that is required in our area. It does mean taking the time to tamp the fill dirt all the way from top to bottom, which can be slower than simply dumping some quick crete in the hole.

    Treefarmer
    That’s what I do as well. If you using a good treated post.

    The pounder is a great idea, we did a lot of them quite a few years ago at our Lions park in the gravel parking lot. No mess and they are tight immediately.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hipplewm View Post
    I don't wish to quibble between concrete or cement

    Quickrete vs Foam

    These will be most likely 4" round posts (3.75" nominal) in 6" holes - I may do 4x4 in 9" holes for certain parts but certainly not the large majority

    I am leaning towards quickrete cause it is just what I know
    Foam doesn't seem that much cheaper if at all
    Foam will be sitting in wet ass clay - I live in the low country - you go down 2 ft, you hit water - dunno how that will work long term

    We are talking roughly 2500 linear feet of fencing
    If they are set deep enough and the dirt properly packed they will hold for decades. Many don't put them very deep and try to compensate by filling with concrete....they rot. I have been told that if you go extra deep and fill with gravel several inches to act as a drain then pack the dirt they will last even longer.

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