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    t post fences?

    Gonna be building a paddock for some goats soon, but I've never had to use t posts and hogwire fencing before. Any pointers?

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    Get yourself a fence post driver. I've seen waaaayyyy to many guys decide they'll be the tough guy and beat them in with 3 lb sledge hammers and after 30 posts they all end up giving up on it. You're also going to need to figure out how you are going to support your corners.

    And for goats, you want you panels/fencing to be 4" (or less!) square mesh. Stoopid goats will get their heads stuck in pretty much anything.
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    Marlin's Avatar
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    Easy to put in, easy to take out. I put them in by hand till the foot plate just disappears. Take them out with a chain wrapped around them and Ken's Bolt-On hooks on the bucket. If they're really in deep or tight use the three point for removal.
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    I've used T-posts with 3-4 strands of electric wire a lot - not sure what hog wire is.....

    My only recommendation is to not get the cheapest flimsy T-posts - they will cause you more aggravation than the cost savings are worth. Buy the heavier posts.

    Also agree with JimR on the post driver unless you are going to be installing 10 posts or less. Again the aggravation factor at work.......
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    I like to cement in the corner posts as well as the gate posts. It adds quite a bit of rigidity to the paddock. Also, I second the purchase of a post pounder.

    If you want all of your posts set to a uniform height, cut a chunk of scrap 2x4 to the same length as how much of the post you want above ground. This is your template to mark all of your posts with a sharpie so you know when to stop pounding. When you are done, screw some open ended eye-hooks into the 2x4 to make a fence fabric stretcher. Use a come-along with your tractor as an anchor to hold the fence fabric taunt while you attach it to the posts.

    If I learned anything from trying to raise goats (switched to sheep after a year) is that they will eat nearly anything and are capable of escaping/climbing anything. Electrify the top and bottom of the fence and you shouldn't have as many issues.

    Good luck!
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimR View Post
    Get yourself a fence post driver. I've seen waaaayyyy to many guys decide they'll be the tough guy and beat them in with 3 lb sledge hammers and after 30 posts they all end up giving up on it. You're also going to need to figure out how you are going to support your corners.

    And for goats, you want you panels/fencing to be 4" (or less!) square mesh. Stoopid goats will get their heads stuck in pretty much anything.
    I don't have any goats, but my neighbor just across the road from me has them. You are soooo right on those goats getting their heads stuck in just about anything. Can't tell you how many times I've seen a goat with his head stuck in the fence & struggling to get free, & I've gone over to get them out of the fence. Then I would go back to my house, take a look across the road & the same dumb ass goat will be stuck in the fence again. These goats are fun to watch, and play with, but boy they sure don't learn much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by coaltrain View Post
    I've used T-posts with 3-4 strands of electric wire a lot - not sure what hog wire is.....
    from my understanding, any wire based panel fence like cow fence or any other welded wire fence is "hogwire fence"

    My only recommendation is to not get the cheapest flimsy T-posts - they will cause you more aggravation than the cost savings are worth. Buy the heavier posts.
    looking on tractor supply's website.. It's hard to tell which is which, and what length to get. If I'm doing 4 foot tall fencing, do I want 6 foot posts, to be able to have two feet under ground? Do I need to cement the corner posts?

    Also agree with JimR on the post driver unless you are going to be installing 10 posts or less. Again the aggravation factor at work.......
    yeah, looking at doing an 80x80 foot area, I'm estimating 36 uprights, and then angle braces for corners.

    Oh yeah, what do you do for making a gate for t post fence??
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evergreen View Post
    I like to cement in the corner posts as well as the gate posts. It adds quite a bit of rigidity to the paddock. Also, I second the purchase of a post pounder.

    If you want all of your posts set to a uniform height, cut a chunk of scrap 2x4 to the same length as how much of the post you want above ground. This is your template to mark all of your posts with a sharpie so you know when to stop pounding. When you are done, screw some open ended eye-hooks into the 2x4 to make a fence fabric stretcher. Use a come-along with your tractor as an anchor to hold the fence fabric taunt while you attach it to the posts.

    If I learned anything from trying to raise goats (switched to sheep after a year) is that they will eat nearly anything and are capable of escaping/climbing anything. Electrify the top and bottom of the fence and you shouldn't have as many issues.

    Good luck!
    Agree 100% about putting in the fence. Goats, yep, eat everything, everything gets a nibble. They will eat tree bark, seats on mowers and tractors, and jump onto everything.
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    Marlin

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    Quote Originally Posted by lewisc1985 View Post
    Oh yeah, what do you do for making a gate for t post fence??
    I bought 2 8' long posts that were meant for chain link fence and used those to mount what Tractor Supply calls a "Wire Filled Gate".
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    My neighbor had goats,,,
    he said, the most important part of the fence is the ladder.
    Lean two ladders against the fence for them to go over, so they will not tear the fence down!!

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