Fire Mitigation
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    Fire Mitigation

    After the recent wild fires in Colorado (less than 10 miles away from us), the wife has finally agreed to let me thin some of our forest. I have been trying to get her to let me do it for a few years but she likes them and the shade... but according to all the experts (US Forest Service, Arborist's, etc...) we are just too thick.

    Now that I have done marked the trees for removal, it looks like A LOT of trees! Around 30 trees on the west side of our house are marked.

    My question(s) to you all... Anyone thinned a forest/tree stand for health and fire mitigation?

    More JD concerned... Anyone used their 1 Series to help fell trees? (Some of these are leaning towards the house and around 30' - 75' tall.) Tips? Finally with all this new wood, I am going to be spending a bit of time near a splitter, which one would you recommend PTO or Hydraulic? (I have the Power Beyond already installed)
    2013 - 2720 - 200CX with 56" Bucket (with 3 Ken's Hooks and 2 Clevis Mounts), 60" Frontier Blade, Land Pride Quick Hitch, Artillian Pallet Forks, 60" Landscape Rake, 60" MMM, 9" Land Pride Auger, 60" Frontier Box Scraper

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    Keeper of the GTT Cookies dieselshadow's Avatar
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    I'm no expert but I'll offer my advice for free!

    The leaners towards the house, get experienced help with those. I can fell a tree. I've done it a quite a few times. But I'm not willing to damage my home or get my equipment damaged, or worse get hurt.

    The splitter, go PTO or a stand alone unit. The PB powered unit will be ssssssslllllllllloooooooooooowwwwwwwwwwwww. You'll have a lot of money in a PB powered unit and have to run your tractor at or near full throttle just to speed it up. Combine the cost of the unit and the excess fuel burned, I think you'll be happier with a PTO unit or a cheaper stand alone system.


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    RRMCCABE's Avatar
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    I don't know how big your trees are. If they are huge, I agree. Call a pro. But, if they are not too bad I normally hook a cable as high in the tress as I can and attach it to back of pickup. I have 100' of cable so truck is clear. I just have someone in truck keep tension on tree as I make my cut.
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    Tom,

    Are you sure how tall the trees are? I ask because a lot of people misjudge trees on the high side.

    Here is a tip using simple geometry to determine the height of something. Get (or make) a simple isosceles right triangle. That is a fancy way of saying a triangle with two sides of the same length forming a right angle, and the third side is whatever length it comes out to be. An easy way is to fold a square in half to make a triangle, and you automatically end up with an isosceles right triangle.

    Then get a plumb bob (or tie a big nut to a piece of string). Hold the string along one of the two sides that are the same length, and but the other side facing towards the ground. The string keeps the one side perpendicular to the ground, and the bottom side will then be parallel to the ground.

    Now hold this contraption up to your nose so you are looking along the longest side at an angle and move towards or away from the object you want to measure until the item lines up with your eye and the angled edge of the triangle. Now measure the distance from where you're standing to the item you want to measure the height of.

    You're almost there. You have to take into account how far your eye is about the ground, so add YOUR height, to the distance from the tree. That is now how tall the tree is (or whatever the item is).

    It sounds convoluted in writing, but takes about 1 minute to actually do it. It would probably make a good video if I could figure out how to do good videos. I have used this method many times and it is always correct. Usually when we're cutting trees down the guys I'm with start freaking out because they think I'm going to hit their vehicles or a house or something. My measurement is always correct and I have never dropped a tree on something important due to having the height wrong (I have dropped trees on things for other reasons though ).

    I only mention this because the tree is probably shorter than you think and may not be close to hitting your house if you drop it wrong. Then again, the tree may be 100' tall and your house may be 50' away.
    Andy B.

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    Captain Hook Kennyd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RRMCCABE View Post
    I don't know how big your trees are. If they are huge, I agree. Call a pro. But, if they are not too bad I normally hook a cable as high in the tress as I can and attach it to back of pickup. I have 100' of cable so truck is clear. I just have someone in truck keep tension on tree as I make my cut.
    I also use a cable or rope, but with a snatch block to reverse the direction of the pull.
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy b. View Post
    Tom,

    Are you sure how tall the trees are? I ask because a lot of people misjudge trees on the high side.

    Here is a tip using simple geometry to determine the height of something. Get (or make) a simple isosceles right triangle. That is a fancy way of saying a triangle with two sides of the same length forming a right angle, and the third side is whatever length it comes out to be. An easy way is to fold a square in half to make a triangle, and you automatically end up with an isosceles right triangle.

    Then get a plumb bob (or tie a big nut to a piece of string). Hold the string along one of the two sides that are the same length, and but the other side facing towards the ground. The string keeps the one side perpendicular to the ground, and the bottom side will then be parallel to the ground.

    Now hold this contraption up to your nose so you are looking along the longest side at an angle and move towards or away from the object you want to measure until the item lines up with your eye and the angled edge of the triangle. Now measure the distance from where you're standing to the item you want to measure the height of.

    You're almost there. You have to take into account how far your eye is about the ground, so add YOUR height, to the distance from the tree. That is now how tall the tree is (or whatever the item is).

    It sounds convoluted in writing, but takes about 1 minute to actually do it. It would probably make a good video if I could figure out how to do good videos. I have used this method many times and it is always correct. Usually when we're cutting trees down the guys I'm with start freaking out because they think I'm going to hit their vehicles or a house or something. My measurement is always correct and I have never dropped a tree on something important due to having the height wrong (I have dropped trees on things for other reasons though ).

    I only mention this because the tree is probably shorter than you think and may not be close to hitting your house if you drop it wrong. Then again, the tree may be 100' tall and your house may be 50' away.
    I am probably wrong on the height (starring at the sun makes it HUGE)... Or maybe I am going blind from... starring at the sun :-(

    The tree(s) are 15' - 25' from the house, and tower over the 2nd story on that side of the house. If I stand on the roof near those trees at the peak, I stare at about 1/2 - 2/3 up the trunk. No question it could hit the house... Just trying to do it safely.

    Talking to the neighbor tonight they had to drop 40 trees 2 years ago due to snow breakage, he and his boy offered to come over and assist. I agree, cable as high up as safely, put tension, cut, and help guide it to safety.Which in these trees cases will be miss the house, and then miss the well head, :-(.
    2013 - 2720 - 200CX with 56" Bucket (with 3 Ken's Hooks and 2 Clevis Mounts), 60" Frontier Blade, Land Pride Quick Hitch, Artillian Pallet Forks, 60" Landscape Rake, 60" MMM, 9" Land Pride Auger, 60" Frontier Box Scraper

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kennyd View Post
    I also use a cable or rope, but with a snatch block to reverse the direction of the pull.
    Or use it to change direction, so that the tractor or truck can be to the side of the danger zone and not falling the tree on too my new 1026R... or truck. Which while it would make a GREAT post and some good pics, it would not make a happy Mrs.
    2013 - 2720 - 200CX with 56" Bucket (with 3 Ken's Hooks and 2 Clevis Mounts), 60" Frontier Blade, Land Pride Quick Hitch, Artillian Pallet Forks, 60" Landscape Rake, 60" MMM, 9" Land Pride Auger, 60" Frontier Box Scraper

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    Quote Originally Posted by andy b. View Post
    Here is a tip using simple geometry to determine the height of something. Get (or make) a simple isosceles right triangle. That is a fancy way of saying a triangle with two sides of the same length forming a right angle, and the third side is whatever length it comes out to be. An easy way is to fold a square in half to make a triangle, and you automatically end up with an isosceles right triangle.

    Then get a plumb bob (or tie a big nut to a piece of string). Hold the string along one of the two sides that are the same length, and but the other side facing towards the ground. The string keeps the one side perpendicular to the ground, and the bottom side will then be parallel to the ground.

    Now hold this contraption up to your nose so you are looking along the longest side at an angle and move towards or away from the object you want to measure until the item lines up with your eye and the angled edge of the triangle. Now measure the distance from where you're standing to the item you want to measure the height of.

    You're almost there. You have to take into account how far your eye is about the ground, so add YOUR height, to the distance from the tree. That is now how tall the tree is (or whatever the item is).
    .
    Here's a link to help with Andy b's advice, which is spot on,btw.
    How Tall Is That Tree?
    Wayne
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    saxamc2's Avatar
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    Tom,
    one of the things I didn't see you say anything about is cleaning up fire load (old pine needles, leaves,twigs etc) off the ground before you start working on the standing trees you have. Also make sure you have a good working spark arrester on your chain saw so that you don't start a raging fire while trying to thin out your forest.
    2019 1025R with 54" MMM, front end loader and backhoe. Just starting out with this machine looking forward to alot of years and many many projects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by saxamc2 View Post
    Tom,
    one of the things I didn't see you say anything about is cleaning up fire load (old pine needles, leaves,twigs etc) off the ground before you start working on the standing trees you have. Also make sure you have a good working spark arrester on your chain saw so that you don't start a raging fire while trying to thin out your forest.
    That is a good point! I have been keeping the needles away from the house, but I need to do more. I carry a fire extinguisher on the 1026R with me, just in case. But I will look into getting a sparky for the husky.
    2013 - 2720 - 200CX with 56" Bucket (with 3 Ken's Hooks and 2 Clevis Mounts), 60" Frontier Blade, Land Pride Quick Hitch, Artillian Pallet Forks, 60" Landscape Rake, 60" MMM, 9" Land Pride Auger, 60" Frontier Box Scraper

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