GX345 carburetor or governor problem?
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Thread: GX345 carburetor or governor problem?

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    GX345 carburetor or governor problem?

    Hi all,
    GX345 died for no apparent reason. Has good spark, fuel out of pump. After removing carb, discovered the shutoff solenoid was the problem. Forced it open and now starts but not running right. In order to get the carb and some linkage to come off, I had to remove the governor arm from governor shaft which is held by a pinch nut. I had a little struggle to get the arm to slide off. Use a screwdriver to pry the "nut" off the shaft.
    Before reassembly, I noted the gov shaft has some end play... maybe 3/16" give or take. Also noted that the shaft can only be rotated a slight amount. I would say based on a clock face, it only rotates about from 12 o'clock to 1 o'clock... minimal amount.
    After rechecking that throttle was set to wide open and shaft rotation in same direction CCW, I reassembled. Problem now is that engine seems to missing some power or RPMs on wide open. Also moving throttle button from idle makes hardly any change until reaching the top end where it runs fastest as it will now. I've been able to mow with it but it struggles on hillside going up and across a big bunch of leaves it bogs down like it never used to do. So I'm concerned the governor is giving me the problems. I did not mess with any settings on the carb or anywhere else.
    I'm wondering if the gov could have been damaged by prying off that pinch nut. I'm really worried that the whole thing has to be torn down to even get to taking off that area where the governor is exposed.
    Any ideas or thoughts much appreciated. With the large air handling assembly that the carb is up against, it's impossible to watch the linkage to see what is going on.
    Thanks very much !

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    Can't address your 345 directly, but it has the same basic engine as my 6x4 Gator, with which I'm intimately familiar. The governor travel you describe is pretty much what it is so don't worry about that. The end play in the shaft is normal. Having said that, I'm thinking your problem is governor related. Not sure what the throttle linkage looks like on your 345, but it's probably held in place by two screws, with one of the screw holes slotted for adjustment. Loosen the screws and rotate the entire assembly in the direction that tends to stretch the spring that controls the throttle arm. That should allow the governor to open the throttle a little more on demand. Check it out.

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    Thanks very much for the reply. It is encouraging and very helpful. The hard thing is that the carb top is right up against the air handling "box" so you can't even view or work with it's linkage and see what you are doing. I will have to review what you wrote when I get back to the project and see what I can figure out. Also the air handling plastic unit I'm referring to has the radiator right on top of it so that is another hindrance to accessing the carb. Anyway... thanks much for your helpful comments. Regards...

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    It's most likely the governor based on your description

    I have a GX345 and rebuilt the engine this past spring and I am familiar with adjusting the governor. Unfortunately, you have opened up a can of worms by removing the governor arm from the shaft. I'll try to find the procedure tomorrow and pm it to you.

    You really should have a tach to set the governor correctly. It sounds like it is operating below speed now, however you will need to set the max RPM after you adjust the arm. I purchased an inexpensive tach/hour meter from Amazon for less than $20. Without a tach, you run the risk of setting the max RPM too high and over-speeding the engine.

    If you need to remove the carburetor at some point again, do not remove the arm from the governor shaft, the Deere service manual recommends against it even when you are rebuilding the engine. It's takes a little bit of maneuvering but you can get the carburetor off without removing the governor arm.

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    Please PM your email address and I will send you the procedures.
    BigJim55 likes this.

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    Thanks for the input guys.... I spoke with fellow that services all the small engine stuff at my local JD dealer. He printed out the pertinent pages from the JD service literature for me and gave me some help in my problem.
    I did remove the carb again …. and... the governor bracket from the governor shaft in order to recheck all my work. Seems I have everything right or close to it? After a bit of a test drive again, it seems like the governor is working or close to working properly. The tractor can tackle the hillside better than before but still isn't running correctly. The JD serviceman didn't seem overly concerned that I had remove the governor arm.
    Issue still remaining is that, for example, pushing up the throttle control fairly swiftly will kill the engine. A slower movement will increase the speed without killing it. It still doesn't seem to be quite up to max speed and it doesn't always run smoothly. A neighbor that is very good at mechanics and has had lots of JD equipment took a look. Though things looked OK but figured it might be a dirty carb valve so going to try some Seafoam in the gas tank. Not sure if the spring on the gov arm is taught when it should be... always seems kinda limp.
    As you increase the throttle control, there seems to be little or no change until the last 1/4 or so of it's travel at which point it comes up nearly to it's max speed. When lowering the throttle, it seems to more gradually change as one would expect. Will have to give it some more thought. No I don't have a way to check RPM.. at least it is definitely running too fast.
    Thanks for your time guys.

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    Likely your engine would be racing if you had a governor failure. Recheck the simple things such as the linkage and throttle plate is working freely, the static governor adjustment should be rechecked, control cable locked down in the proper position. Should the Seafoam not pretty up the inside of the carb, you may need to go back inside regarding the hesitation. When this happens, is it starving for fuel or is it smoking and loading up?

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    Did you get the procedure for indexing the arm to the governor shaft? I don't recall finding that in the JD manual and pulled it from the Kawasaki manual. It's really not an issue that you pulled the arm but you do need to properly index the arm following the procedure below.

    The procedure in the Kawasaki manual provides the following:
    • Install the governor arm onto the governor shaft temporarily.
    • Install the control panel assembly, and connect the governor arm with the governor spring.
    • Be sure the link spring around the throttle link rod is in place and that it pulls the governor arm and throttle lever each other.
    • Loosen the clamp nut on the governor arm enough to move the governor shaft.
    • Turn Top end of the governor arm counterclockwise to fully open the carburetor throttle valve and hold it there.
    • Turn the governor shaft counterclockwise by inserting a needle into the shaft end hole. Fully turn the shaft to end of its travel and tighten the nut to the specification
    • Be sure the governor shaft extend from the governor arm is approximately 7mm (0.3in).


    Once that is done you should complete the steps in the JD manual starting on page 141 and ending on page 144.

    If you haven't done the above, it would explain the issues that you are describing.

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    Well in reworking everything, I did check for all those things you mentioned. When watching the governor arm (upper end with throttle linkage on it) and operating the throttle control knob, that are is what I see moving a little as you advance the knob, then not much movement for next portion of throttle knob movement. Then it seems to catch up again (like maybe a weak spring action at which point it next finishes as far as it will go determined by the linkage I guess. That governor arm movement should be a direct connection via the linkage rod, to the carb throttle valve. So it seems logical that with the uneven movement I see, corresponds to the uneven speeding up of the engine.
    I will have to review all this tomorrow so as to maybe describe it a bit better. BTW, the choke action seems to work just fine.

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    Just making sure that you specifically performed steps 4 through 6.

    It seems odd that the spring would be weakened, as you didn't have the problem before, unless you stretched it when taking the carburetor off.

    Still sounds like an adjustment issue to me but if you didn't replace the carburetor to manifold gaskets, you could have a leak causing some erratic behavior.

    And at the risk of sounding like a broken record, I strongly advocate picking up a cheap tach.

    Good luck.

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