Need some advice on 2032R / 2038R
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    Need some advice on 2032R / 2038R

    I'm new to the forum but over the last few weeks have read every thread I could find on the new(er) 2032R and 2038R. I have a couple of specific questions for which I'd greatly appreciate input, particularly from those who have owned a new series 2032R or 2038R for a while, and even more particularly if you have use the 59" front snow blower.

    I live on about 2 acres of property but would mostly use a new tractor on my 100 acres of bush land an hour and half away. Over the next few years on the 100 acres I intend to improve the road into the property (about 1/4 mile), clear an area to build a new cabin, move a few hundred yards of stone and gravel to make a dam/bridge across the end of a beaver pond, and pull modest size firewood logs and/or small trailer loads of firewood out of the bush. Once the cabin is built and I retire a few years from now, I plan to spend a lot of time there, including in the winter. At that point I plan to buy the 59" front snowblower, and will be keeping about half a mile of road/driveway clear for winter access. It's not a super high snow area, but it's not unusual to get a foot or more at a time, and build up 3+ ft of snow in the bush by mid winter. Wet snow and layers of freezing rain are also not uncommon.

    I"m pretty much set on either the 2032R or 2038R but am struggling to decide which one to buy (as so many have!). I plan to get the FEL and backhoe when I order the tractor. I won't be using a mower on it, although there is a slight possibility I might get a 4 or 5 foot bush hog at some point. I doubt I'd ever invest in a wood chipper (cheap to rent and who needs it with 100 acres to let branches decay into soil). However, the 59" snow blower is definitely in the plans for the future, and I think this is probably the only reason to even consider going beyond the 2032R.

    Which brings me to my questions:
    Would the 2038R be a better choice particularly for the 59" front snow blower? I know more power is always better if affordable, but here in Canada it's a $2500 upper to get the 2038 (about US$1800 at the current exchange rate). I don't think any of my other applications would require the extra horsepower. It would be great to hear from those of you who have the 59" front blower on either the 2032 or 2038. I could swing the extra $2500 if the extra hp truly made a difference, but as others have said, that money could also be used for some other options (like box blade, dipper thumb, etc.) Of course, I'd buy those anyway but you get the point!

    Any concerns over longevity or reported problems with the turbo on the 2038R? Of course any extra parts means potential for failure, but some say the small tractor turbos are relatively bulletproof. On the bright side, JD has a 6 year powertrain warranty, so that provides some peace of mind.

    Also, my dealer says that JD strongly discourages loading the rear tires on the 2 series tractor. They'll do it if I ask, but they highly recommend just using the backhoe or ballast box for rear end weight. He says the concern with the loaded tires is the extra twist it puts on the frame on uneven ground, and also transfers some of that weight to the front axle under some situation such as downhill side slope, which can make the front axle fail prematurely. Any thoughts on load/no-load in the tires would be appreciated.

    And then there's the tire question: I won't be mowing but will occasionally be driving over sod that I'd rather not tear to pieces, so I won't go ag tires, but am trying to determine whether to go with industrial (R4) tires or the R3 turf tires. It seems may say the turf tires are better on snow and ice, but my area is fairly flat so that may not be an issue. My concern is more with using the tractor in the bush on hills and some side slopes. Could be dirt/leaves/rocks/roots on the hills in the bush, and of course water/mud in a few low lying areas. I need a tire that is tough on the occasional sharp rock edge or small diameter stump, while still giving good forward and side traction. Advice would be appreciated

    Final question: do I need to have the in-line heater and/or transmission heater installed (don't think they have a traditional "block heater") for starting in cold weather? Normal mid-winter weather in my area is nights down around 0F but 20 below F is not unheard of for short stretches. I don't have grid power up on my 100 acres, but could use a generator if needed to plug it in for a while.

    Apologies for the long winded explanation and questions but it would be great to hear the advice from those who have experience with these 2 series tractors in these conditions.

    Thanks in advance!
    greenharley and Herminator like this.
    1961 Massey Ferguson 50
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    414concrete's Avatar
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    Holy long post!

    I will let some of the resident expert owners here who’ve had their machines longer answer your questions. Lots of great members here with lots of helpful knowledge.

    My story was, I wanted the top of the line 2r model, turbo and all! Damn wants vs needs. My advice is get every darn option you can NOW. I’m going back for a backhoe this spring and kicking myself I didn’t get it a year ago with the tractor
    2018 2038r, FEL, 60” CommandCut MMM, Krpan 3,5 forestry winch, Frontier pallet forks, Frontier AS10F snow push, wheel weights, wheel spacers, fender extensions, premium LED lights, dual rear SCVs, single-point hydraulic coupler

    270B in my future

    Sold: 2016 1025r, FEL, 60” auto connect, 54” snow blower

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    Quote Originally Posted by profdave View Post

    I"m pretty much set on either the 2032R or 2038R but am struggling to decide which one to buy (as so many have!). I plan to get the FEL and backhoe when I order the tractor.
    Just curious as to why you picked the 2032/2038R tractors?

    100 acres to manage et al........... get a bigger tractor. I would think you should be starting at the 3 series.
    Glen

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    2017 - JD 1025R w/260B backhoe
    2018 - JD 1025R w/Mauser Cab

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    From what you explain in paragraph 2 of your post I would be considering a 3 or 4 series tractor.

    You are concentrating on horse power and not frame size. I think you need to look at that.

    And about the loaded tires - this is the first time I have ever heard such a thing. For your intended use I would not hesitate to load the rear tires.

    It sounds like this will be a lifetime purchase. Consider those larger frame tractors and also consider a cab. If you are going to retire there and do snow removal on a 1/2 mile road a cab will be a certain necessity. Yeah, the sticker shock will be present but buy it once and buy it right.
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    Quote Originally Posted by profdave View Post
    Also, my dealer says that JD strongly discourages loading the rear tires on the 2 series tractor. They'll do it if I ask, but they highly recommend just using the backhoe or ballast box for rear end weight. He says the concern with the loaded tires is the extra twist it puts on the frame on uneven ground, and also transfers some of that weight to the front axle under some situation such as downhill side slope, which can make the front axle fail prematurely. Any thoughts on load/no-load in the tires would be appreciated.
    Wow... that's a new one. It would be interesting to know exactly where the dealer got this information as the 220R loader operator's manual lists the items below. Also, there is no difference to the drive train between wheel weights and fluid filled tires and JD still lists wheel weights as a configurable option in the 2-series Build Your Own tool.

    The system (tractor/loader) always requires to be counterbalanced. Depending on the system, there are three possible areas required to add ballast. They can be one or a combination of the following: Fluid in the tires, rear wheel weights, and a 3-point hitch ballast.

    Fluid Filled Rear Tires
    When using fluid in the rear wheels for ballasting, do not fill the tires more than 75% allowing for expansion. Use a mixture of 1.6 kg (3.5 lb) of calcium chloride to 4 L (1 gal) of water when filling the rear tires.
    Minimum Rear Ballast 368 kg (811 lb) rear hitch ballast




    2012 2720 -- 200CX Loader -- 54" Quick Attach Snow Blower -- Frontier LR5060 Rake -- Land Pride RB1660 Blade (Hydraulic Angle) -- Artillian 42" Forks -- Ken's Bolt on Grab Hooks -- Fit Rite Hydraulic top-link -- 2013 X500 for mowing duties

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    Keeping a half mile road open with a blower with no cab....no problem....if you can control wind direction, which you obviously cannot.
    Get a 3046 with cab and R4 tires.
    That was easy. What's next?
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    I've gone back and forth on this 100 times, and my perspective is evolving, so I keep contributing to these threads. My apologies to those tired of reading my posts on this subject.

    I bought a 2032R and if I had it to do over, I would have bought a 2038. But...my reason may not be what you think. When I bought it, it was supposed to be my last tractor. Then, just a few months later, my financial situation changed dramatically. And now there's no way it's going to be my last tractor. I am waiting for a redesign of the 3R series.

    My reasoning is simple. The combination of modern emissions equipment (DPF, etc.) and a turbo are a potential for disaster (do you have the same emissions tech in Canada?). I just heard a story, for example, from my dealership's service department about a larger tractor with a twin turbo, where one feeds into the other. The first one spilled something into the second one, which caused it to fail, which in turn caused a failure of the DPF, which caused so much heat that the exhaust "chimney" was glowing red. It destroyed the engine compartment and melted the windshield of the tractor cab. Without the DPF, odds are the guy would have noticed the power loss before engine damage and it would have been a simple turbo replacement. But the DPF turned it into a catastrophic failure. Fortunately he was under warranty. There are many examples of DPF related turbo failure in the commercial on-road diesel truck world (and turbo related DPF failtures), but with tractors, this is a relatively new thing. DPFs were added to most JD turbo tractors around 2014-2016, depending on model. These are all new and we have yet too see what will happen (and we won't for many years). A turbo itself is one of the most reliable components on a diesel. But the turbo itself is not really my concern. If I were buying "my last tractor," that I intended to keep until it or I died, you could not force me to buy a turbo at gun point. But, with the long warranties that are currently being doubled, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one if I knew I was going to sell it or trade it in before it exploded.

    Also, I am a district fire commissioner, and when talking about purchasing fire trucks with commissioners from other districts, there seems to be a consensus forming that the new diesels with the emissions components won't last nearly as long as the old ones, so we have to budget/plan accordingly. I have no evidence of this as our district only has one new truck with emissions tech, but that is what the others are saying.

    It's not that I think all or most of these turbo tractors are going to explode. It's more like IF this happened to my tractor when it was out of warranty, it would be an epic disaster. But now I probably won't have my tractor when it's out of warranty, so the issue is moot.

    As for your questions...the snowblower is not really a HP intensive task, though it can be under some circumstances. I know that sounds odd, but the issue is that HP lets you go faster, and if you go too fast with a snowblower, you spill snow over the top and around the sides. I run a 64" rear blower and I can't max out the tractor's speed without spilling what I consider too much snow. Now if you hit a very tall drift that's higher than your blower, that becomes a HP intensive task and you can go faster with more power without messing up what you're doing. I don't know how much faster, but I don't imagine it would be much. We get very tall drifts but a turbo would save me 5 minutes a month. Your situation may vary, but you're going to be running a substantially smaller blower (the rear 64 is not only wider but significantly taller than the front 59).

    Brush hogging is a great example of something that is always better/faster with more HP. No ifs, ands or buts.

    I love the 2032R, I don't need the extra HP, and I don't regret buying it at all. But since I now know I will trade/sell it, had I known that when I bought it, I would have paid the extra for the turbo, because there would be no reason not to. The 3R tractor I trade it for won't be my last one either, so I will buy the most powerful one just because.
    2019 X758, 54" Autoconnect deck
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    mike01's Avatar
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    I noticed you asked about block heaters and transmission oil heaters. They do make a block heater for the large 2R. I have both it and the transmission heater. You don't need either, but they sure are nice to have, and they don't cost much. So why not.
    2019 X758, 54" Autoconnect deck
    2018 2032R, 220R Loader, dual rear SCV, hydraulic top link, SB1164 Snow Blower, RC2072 rotary cutter, BB5048L box blade, 42" Titan forks, BB2060L back blade

    Owned in the past:
    X570, X758 (2015), 1025R, X590

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    Quote Originally Posted by 414concrete View Post
    Holy long post!

    I will let some of the resident expert owners here who’ve had their machines longer answer your questions. Lots of great members here with lots of helpful knowledge.

    My story was, I wanted the top of the line 2r model, turbo and all! Damn wants vs needs. My advice is get every darn option you can NOW. I’m going back for a backhoe this spring and kicking myself I didn’t get it a year ago with the tractor

    One of the reasons I'm wavering on the 2032 vs 2038 is that the extra $ saved on the 32 would help with getting some of those options!
    greenharley, PJR832 and goat704! like this.
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    Since I only have about 12 hours on my first tractor, I can not be the voice of experience. However your questions echoed so many of my own so I thought I'd share my reasoning. Only time will tell if I got it right for my circumstances.

    I have 7-1/2 acres in central NY so our climate and winters are similar. I have one small slope and the rest is relatively flat. I didn't plan to farm but I have a fair bit of things planned to do. Primary concern was a front mount snow blower as I just can't turn around like I used to.

    I got the 59" snow blower and so far it is the only thing I have used. My 2032R seems to be about right and has no problems with it. I have a ballast box on the back with sand bags for now. I also have the FEL, BH, tiller and rake. Though the BH would balance out the SB, it would make the whole thing longer in a limited space. I didn't want the mower.

    I got the OTC soft cab so I can remove it with the snow blower. For this size a cab interfers with the BH seat making it an either/or choice for me. I also like the open air when it isn't winter.

    Mud season here is a definite concern. I chose the R4 tires for traction and even seriously considered Ag tires. Even though I don't want to tear up the lawn, getting stuck once would do it. Everything I own has been stuck in my back yard at least once. Tread patterns smooth down faster than ruts. Though filling the tires would give me more weight and stability, I could always do it later if needed. I wanted to keep the weight down for now.

    The dealer laughed when I insisted on chains. The ladder chains on the R4 tires are really not a good match as you wobble all over. I took them off once delivered and haven't missed them so far. The plus for me was the gotcha's. Chains required adding rear wheel spacers to ensure clearance for the power beyond used for the BH. Another benefit is a slightly wider stance and a little better stability. Now I am set for chains and plan on a different style for when I need them. The R4 and MFWD seemed to work OK, even on some ice this winter. I have also learned to check into other possible gotchas before making any changes.

    Get the water heater intalled. You will need it sometimes in winter. Beginner thinking says the engine will appreciate a warm start even if it isn't cold enough to be a must.

    If I had that much land to seriously work I would have gone for bigger, a 3 or even 4 series. Still, small and nimble has it's place. I am not positive, but I think a hard cab and BH don't interfere with each other on the larger sizes.

    Based on my limited experience I would recommend getting everything you think you want on the initial purchase. I think you'll get a better deal overall. Going back, even the next month, to get something seems to jack up the price. And it seems that my dealer doesn't want to sell some things unless they install it too. I still have to test them on that this year.

    Things I wish I had gotten at the beginning: sub soiler to improve drainage, pallet forks, and the FEL hydraulic quick attach (or whatever it is called). I asked about it and was told they couldn't because of the snow blower. I went back with proof it can be done by the dealer and they quoted me $800 for the kit and $300 to install. They insist on doing the install. I also want to get a remote spout control for the SB. Handy in confined areas. I love the idea of a grapple but I am not sure I can make best use of it. Maybe a BH thumb.

    I am still learning and this site has helped. Since my tractor was delivered just in time for winter, I haven't had a chance to use it for anything else yet. As they year goes by I am sure I will learn a lot more.
    2032R, 220R FEL, 270B Backhoe, RT1157 Tiller, 59" 2000 Snow Blower, LR 2072 Rake, OTC Cab, CL Subsoiler, 3pt Tow Hitch, UA 42" Forks, IMatch with Kenny's Hook, Kenny's Bolt-On Hooks

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