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Thread: Machined a replacement anti-scalp roller shaft

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    sennister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwmeyer View Post
    John, Shaft DOES rotate! Maybe it's not supposed to...by design... but it rotates in use. Look at the pics of your shaft in your first post: heavy/deep wear marks where shaft turned in elongated holes that you bushed (from shaft wear).

    Hmm, I can see brazing with GTAW or GMAW, but SMAW? I've never heard of a brazing rod used in a stick welder. Bob
    I think he was just listing the type of welding he is equipped to do. Brazing is typically done with a Oxy/Acetylene torch. At least that is how I do it. You want to heat the base metals and use capillary action to pull the material being used for brazing into the joint. It can be done with an arc type welder but at least in the home setting most use a torch.


    JD Z950R 60" Deck with DFS Collection System

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  3. Top | #12

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    To me, brazing is like soldering, just a higher temperature and a different filler material. I don't think (??) there's any melting of base metals. Bob
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwmeyer View Post
    John, Shaft DOES rotate! Maybe it's not supposed to...by design... but it rotates in use. Look at the pics of your shaft in your first post: heavy/deep wear marks where shaft turned in elongated holes that you bushed (from shaft wear).
    The shaft is captured with a cotter key - a bolt in the eye of the key is bolted to the bracket. Through constant motion, the cotter key wore away some permitting some movement which led to other parts being able to move, etc. etc. It's not designed to move but it did over time. I think it's simply an inadequate design. Another problem is the height of the roller bracket is fixed to the deck - it can't be adjusted up and down.

    Hmm, I can see brazing with GTAW or GMAW, but SMAW? I've never heard of a brazing rod used in a stick welder. Bob
    sennister is correct - I braze with an oxy/acetylene torch. The other processes are the 'official' descriptions for MIG/TIG/stick welding processes (not necessarily in order.)
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    sennister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwmeyer View Post
    To me, brazing is like soldering, just a higher temperature and a different filler material. I don't think (??) there's any melting of base metals. Bob
    That is correct. Then main difference is when welding the base metal is melted and when brazing it is not. The capillary action used when brazing and the process is very much like when doing copper plumbing work. I think the main difference is the filler and temps to a point but they are basically the same thing.

    About the only time I am brazing is when I am trying to join two different base metals but technically they can be the same. When dealing with different base metals at different melting points you really can't weld them as you would just have a mess. That is where brazing comes in.

    This explains the difference between soldiering and brazing pretty well. The biggest difference is as you pointed out. The filler material and because of that the melting point of the filler. Soldiering is normally lead, tin or other like alloys with a low melting point around 300c. Brazing uses copper tin zinc and alloys with a much higher melting point above 500c. That is why you soldier copper plumbing not braze it. The temps are too high and you would be melting the copper pipe. However the process is pretty similar.

    What is the difference between brazing and soldering? - Quora
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    JD Z950R 60" Deck with DFS Collection System

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    sennister's Avatar
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    Also nice job with the lathe work. I have my dad's old Atlas 618 and I am always looking for an excuse to use it. He had gotten a newer Delta (I think) metal lathe and had the old Atlas sitting in the shed. One day I asked him about it and said he could just as easily store it in my "shed" aka shop.

    It is fun to find an problem like that and figure out what it will take to fix it rather than run to the parts store all the time and take the easy way out.

    I look at it as a way to justify having the shop.
    Last edited by sennister; 07-01-2019 at 10:37 AM.
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    JD Z950R 60" Deck with DFS Collection System

    JD X585, 54C deck,
    CTC Model X4750 F.E.L - Modified Imp Pressure Relief from 900 to 1175PSI, Power Flow and MC519 cart, 54-inch Quick-Hitch Front Blade, 47-inch Quick-Hitch Snow Blower, 3-pt hitch, HF Quick Hitch, Heavy Hitch, 48" box blade/rear blade, Dethacher, 3pt Sprayer

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    Quote Originally Posted by sennister View Post
    Also nice job with the lathe work. I have my dad's old Atlas 618 and I am always looking for an excuse to use it. He had gotten a newer Delta (I think) metal lathe and had the old Atlas sitting in the shed. One day I asked him about it and said he could just as easily store it in my "shed" aka shop.

    It is fun to find an problem like that and figure out what it will take to fix it rather than run to the parts store all the time and take the easy way out.

    I look at it as a way to justify having the shop.
    Thanks! I've had a lot of fun with the lathe, I have stamps for three suppressors and machined two, need to start the 5.56mm can. I learned a bunch with that project. I try to keep a variety of steel, stainless steel, brass and aluminum stocked for the odd project or repair, it's really come in handy. Out here I just can't make a ten minute run to the hardware store and it's more fun to make a part anyway.

    Since I have a bit of time involved with making the bearing I thought I better make a test bearing and practice welding (TIG) it into a similar bracket. I found some steel the same thickness as the Gravely bracket, made a 1" hole and tried to just melt the bearing and the plate together with no filler rod but that was going to require way too much heat. So I added a little filler and that worked quite well. I haven't used the Miller TIG machine in months but I did an okay job after practicing on my test parts.

    Too bad I don't have any Gravely red paint to paint the bracket (LOL.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails TestTiggingOnScrap.jpg   FlapperCleanupReadyToPrime.jpg   PrimedReadyForPaint.jpg  
    rtgt and Herminator like this.
    2010 Model 4720 with cab and H180 loader, MX8, MX6, Frontier BB1172 box blade, forks, bale spear, rear blade, WR Long grapple and tooth bar, Fit Rite Hydraulics top and tilt. 2019 Bobcat E42 excavator with cab & several attachments. 2019 Deere Z945M EFI ZTrak 60" 7 Iron Pro deck. 1998 Komatsu D39P-1 dozer (size of a Cat D5, sold)

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