Show us, and teach us, about where you're from.....
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    Jer
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    Show us, and teach us, about where you're from.....

    Hi,

    After reading Bavarian's 260 Backhoe post I was thinking it would be nice if we all took a bit of time and did a little write up about what our parts of the world are like - weather, landscape, culture, sports, industry, agriculture, etc. I spent about 10 days in Munich/Brixen/Bozen and it was absolutely stunning.

    We have a very diverse group from all corners of North America and some from Europe, it'd be pretty cool to have some insight into what it's like where we live.

    Normally at this time I'd say "OK, I'll start" but it's really late, so I'll do it another time......

    -J.
    DRobinson, Nod and UnionSchnauzer like this.
    2014 JD 5075M (just barely pre T IV emissions), H310 with bucket mounted grapple, HLA powertine forks, 8' HLA snowblade, Schulte SDX-840 Snowblower, Rhino 12' Flail, 6' Sweepster 3pt PTO broom, hydraulic toplink from CCM, LED lights front and back, big pile of 3pt implements.

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    Wish List:
    now that I have a cozy cab, nothing really....

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    johnH123's Avatar
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    Been a native of Bloomington, IN, all my life. Very beautiful area, with hills, plains, and cow pastures. The main agriculture is corn, soy, cattle. The best deli is the Bloomingfoods market and deli over by the radio station. Most tractor owners own deere, which, of course, is a good thing! The weather is a mix of weather from all over the world. Some years, the summer is hot, humid, and sticky. I'm talking 90-102*. The winters can sometimes be below zero wind chill. But, usually, it is nice 70-80*, with a nice breeze blowing.
    - 2002 John Deere 4510 TLB PR,
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    -Countyline box blade,
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    - Farm Star rear bale spear

    Yamaha Rhino 700, Yamaha Rhino 660,
    Murray 624 mower/38" deck

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    Evergreen's Avatar
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    Upper Peninsula, Michigan

    Some of you have probably hear rumors of "da UP" and "Yoopers"... most of them are probably true.

    For those who don't know, "The Upper Peninsula" refers to the portion of Michigan located north of "The Lower Peninsula". Although Michigan is politically one state it is not one state geographically; two large landmasses separated by the 5 mile Straights of Mackinac. Even though the UP is nearly of Michigan's land, it contains only 3% of it's population. If you aren't on a paved road, you are truly in the middle of nowhere. Because of this we have some of the best hunting and fishing in the world; game birds ranging from partridge to turkey, waterfowl, small game, predators like bobcat and coyote, bear, deep water fishing, inland lake fishing, river and stream fishing, ice fishing, and of course the white-tailed deer. November 15th, the opening day of firearm deer season, is so important that most schools and businesses shut down for the day... if not the whole week. And if hunting and fishing don't suit you, the UP is home to hundreds of miles of ORV trails, snowmobile trails, cross-country ski trails, hiking trails, mountain biking, mountain climbing, etc, etc. Just bring bug spray if you visit in the summer. My Upper Peninsula sport of choice is dog sledding.

    Speaking of summer; for the most part it is nice. Summer runs from mid-May to mid-September. Temps rarely pass 90* and you are never more than an hours drive from one of the largest fresh water lakes in the world. Fall runs from the end of September to mid-November. Although short on time, it is one of the more colorful times as the huge maple forests change their leaves. Winter can be brutal; running from Thanksgiving to the middle of March. Most of the UP accumulates at least 200" of snow each year with many parts receiving close to twice that. It is not uncommon to wake up to find that several feet of new snow fell while you slept. Winter temps can plunge down into the -40's without factoring in windchill and it is common to have at least one or two weeks of continual sub-zero temperatures. Spring (also known as Mud Season and Pot Hole Season) typically goes from March to May and is a great time to score winter clothing at very discounted prices.

    All this has made the people of the UP (aka, Yooper (singular), Yoopers (plural)) a hearty bunch of folks. Most of the people up here are very friendly and will go out of their way to help strangers and old friends alike. Because mining and logging plays such a huge part in the history of the area, most people from the UP are of Northern European decent: Finns, Swedes, Norwegians, and for some reason there are a lot of Italians here too. Going to "camp" (what most people would call a 40 with a cabin) is a staple of UP life. Most camps are just one room cabins in the woods with a sauna and an outhouse in back. It is not uncommon for a camp to have been in a family for over a hundred years. Going to camp is how Yoopers escape the 9 to 5 grind and get back to basics. Many of Ernst Hemingway's more famous works were written while at his family camp on the shore of Lake Superior.

    Being so close to Wisconsin means a lot of farmers are loyal to Allis-Chalmers. Being a poorer area too, Farmall/International has a good foothold as well. Not a whole lot of people running John Deere tractors bigger than a SCUT. I may go a whole summer and not see more than a half dozen old Deere's for sale. Hey, if that's the only downside of this place then it still isn't half bad!
    glc, etcallhome, DRobinson and 8 others like this.
    '50 Model M w/electronic ignition, 12v conversion, and a 3pt conversion plus a homemade snowplow, a Deere Model 51 trailer plow, a Woods RM59 finish mower, a Bark Buster splitter, and a few other toys.
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    '07 F250 XL Powerstroke, crew cab, short box, 4x4.
    '85 F150... I finally sold my very first truck after racking up over half-a-million miles on the original drivetrain.

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    Well I grew up in Detroit, Michigan. A city with a glorious past that had fallen to the way side over the last 70 years. The photos here do a much better job of describing it than I could ever put into words.

    I'll give you an idea of what the above site contains.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    John Deere 318, 50in deck, 54in blade w/ power angle

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    johnH123's Avatar
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    the best place for icecream is the chocolate mousse downtown. they have the creamiest, most amazing ice cream ever, with many original flavors.
    UnionSchnauzer likes this.
    - 2002 John Deere 4510 TLB PR,
    -Woods BB60X 60" rotary cutter
    -Countyline box blade,
    -Allis Chalmers sickle mower,
    -RED windrow rake,
    -titan 48" 3000 pound forks/bale spear
    - Farm Star rear bale spear

    Yamaha Rhino 700, Yamaha Rhino 660,
    Murray 624 mower/38" deck

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    Nod
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    I can associate with 2 of the posts already. First, I spent 2 1/2 years in Bavaria while in the Army back in the early 60's and loved it. I've gone back for a short visit once.

    And secondly, I also grew up in the UP of Michigan but left when I graduated high school. Just to give you an idea of how unpopulated the UP is, there were only 121 kids in our school from Kindergarten thru 12 th grade. Our class had 10 kids but we had a graduating class of only 3 kids once. Every thing that Evergreen said is true, although he forgot to mention that wolves are also thriving in the UP. And he didn't mention "Pasties", a staple food there. I'll admit that I seldom go back there even though I've lived in IL. for the past 49 years.

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    Well, I was born at a very young age....Floridian born, moved from there to Ga., then to Tenn., then to NC, then to Va., then to Del, then to NJ, where I finished high school.
    Dad worked for Bechtel Corporation, one of the largest contractors world-wide, so it seemed like we moved so much t accommodate his workload.
    Ended up with me bypassing 2nd grade and 4th grade, due to "placement testing" in different school systems to find out where they thought I would best "fit in". By the time I got to 11th grade, at the ripe age of 15, I thought that was pretty cool, until I found out I was too young to enroll in Drivers Education classes.
    Senior year, all my buds were driving cars to school, and I was just getting my drivers permit.
    Already knew from 10th grade on I wanted to join the service and pop sprung for the money for me to go to Catholic High School that had ROTC programs available, even though I wasn't Catholic.
    Good grades, high SAT scores, dads political influence, and my schools recommendations earned me a spot at the Naval Academy thanks to a Congressional Sponsorship from Joe Biden Sr.
    Took and passed all Mechanical Engineering courses at the Academy, graduated and went on to Naval Aviation Flight School, didn't quite pass the vision testing for pilot and ended up as a RIO (radar intercept officer/back seat navigation) in a squadron that was still utilizing 17 year old F-4 Phantoms. F-4 B, F-4 N, last letter is radar component designation.
    Long story shortened, pilot "crashed" us on deck of CV-60 Saratoga in Gulf of Tonkin (not his fault, right landing gear collapsed when the tail-hook grabbed the arresting cable.
    Broke my left leg and pelvic bone, sent back to U.S. at Walter Reed, healed up, was found "not suited for flight operations any longer", finished Naval career behind a dang desk.
    Came out, and pop says, "How would you like to work for Local 322 UA Pipefitter Union"? Well, the rest is history.
    Worked 38 years in Process Piping as a Pipefitter / Pipe Foeman / Pipe Supt. / Field Engineer, in Petrochemical, Nuclear, Pharmaceutical, Industrial, Commercial, and Military Base projects.
    Along the way, married a sweetheart I met (told her two weeks later I thought she was the one I wanted to settle down with the rest of my life), courted for 3 years, married, had 1 girl and 2 boys, retired, and just had our 40th Wedding Anniversary.
    Not in "the best of health" any longer, but, my fighting spirit keeps letting me wake up every morning to whatever plan God has laid out for me.
    Yeah, I know, boring life........
    The I.R.S. must love poor folks, they create more and more every day.

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    pappa's Avatar
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    Nod,
    I got to give you a shout out for your post. Where I grew up in Oakland, California (home of the NBA champion Warriors)" Pasties" were something strippers wore to cover their nepals not necessarily something to eat .I have lived 2 miles from a downtown area (post office, general store) of a town with a population of 180 people for the last 42 years. My child was the only one in her grade. Lovin life in Extremely rural America!
    2320 200cx loader, 46 backhoe, 54"snowblower, original cab, Titan 42" forks, welded on hooks by neighbor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nod View Post
    And he didn't mention "Pasties", a staple food there.
    I can't believe I forgot about pasties because I had to take apart my keyboard last month to clean the pasty crumbs out of it!

    A pasty is a lot like a calzone, but instead of being filled with pizza, it is typically stuffed with meat and potatoes. Also instead of a pizza crust, a good pasty crust is flaky and made with lard. So I guess the only thing it has in common with a calzone is the shape. They are one of the traditional foods brought over by the Cornish tin miners who provided the jump-start of knowledge and muscle to mine the huge deposits of iron, copper, and gold found up here. In fact, dollar-for-dollar, more copper has come out of the mines of the Upper Peninsula than the California, Yukon, and Klondike gold rushes combined!

    If anyone thinks that the green vs red vs orange vs blue tractor debate can become an intense debate on other forums, you have never seen two yoopers arguing over who makes the best pasty. Family pasty recipes are secrets guarded better than a nuclear power plant.

    For those of you who have moved away from the UP and miss pasties, several pasty shops up here will pack a dozen or more on dry ice and mail them to you. Jean Kay's Pasties in Marquette are my favorite but Doblers in Escanaba aren't too bad.
    Vern1026R, felixm22, Levi and 3 others like this.
    '50 Model M w/electronic ignition, 12v conversion, and a 3pt conversion plus a homemade snowplow, a Deere Model 51 trailer plow, a Woods RM59 finish mower, a Bark Buster splitter, and a few other toys.
    '69 Sears Suburban 14 48" deck and 42" back blade, an estate rake, and a sweeper.
    '07 F250 XL Powerstroke, crew cab, short box, 4x4.
    '85 F150... I finally sold my very first truck after racking up over half-a-million miles on the original drivetrain.

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    Eastern Va

    I'm from a farm family in eastern Va. I laugh and say our family didn't get out much as we've been in the same area for a l - o - n - g time, at least as time is considered in the US. Crops here are mostly corn, soybeans, wheat and a little bit of barley. Our county also have some substantial fresh market vegetable growers and several large horticulture operations. We gave up row crop farming some time ago and rent that land to someone else but still have cattle, hay and timber.

    Compared to the UP of Michigan, weather here is very mild but summers tend to be hot and humid as we have water on three sides of us. 90*+ with high humidity is pretty common, (dew point may hit 75 or more). Some snow in the winter but a real snow maker has to have a storm coming up the east coast along with cold air from the west, unless (and this happens sometimes) all that water around us is frozen. Otherwise a big snow storm is 8-12" and we might only get 2-3 of those and sometimes none for the year.

    Topography is coastal plain Va. I think the highest elevation in the county is less than 150' above sea level. Soils are varied from sand to sandy loam to pure loam onto the clay spectrum and a black muck above an impervious level of grey clay. Sometimes all of those are in the same field which makes life interesting.

    Treefarmer
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