The "Interview" of El Chappo Guzman, Notorius Drug Lord, by Sean Penn
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree9Likes
  • 1 Post By SulleyBear
  • 2 Post By sstlaure
  • 2 Post By Bigfoot Brent
  • 1 Post By SulleyBear
  • 2 Post By sstlaure
  • 1 Post By HydroHarold

Thread: The "Interview" of El Chappo Guzman, Notorius Drug Lord, by Sean Penn

  1. Top | #1
    SulleyBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:10 PM
    Location
    Beautiful beaches, moderated summer heat and lake effect snows. Right where I want to be.
    Posts
    6,971
    Thanks
    1,401
    Thanked 2,487 Times in 1,396 Posts

    The "Interview" of El Chappo Guzman, Notorius Drug Lord, by Sean Penn

    I took some time last night and read the Rolling Stone interview of El Chappo Guzman which was written by Sean Penn. Generally, my opinion of Rolling Stone magazine is very unfavorable and often they sensationalize reports primarily in what appears to be an effort to keep themselves relevant in the discussion of current events and to survive as a "Magazine". Sean Penn is another topic. I would have to admit that he and I have an entirely different view of the world and it is unlikely we see too many things in the same vein.

    For those of you who may not be aware, Sean Penn has a well documented history of siding with Socialist and Dictators. He has befriended controversial leaders like Hugo Chavez of Venezuela and he even suggested that anyone referring to Chavez as a "dictator" should be arrested. Now, I should specify, he was suggesting American's be arrested in America for saying Chavez is a "dictator". So much for the 1st Amendment.

    Penn also supports Argentina's claim to the Falkland Islands and has made some outrageous comments which irritated many, including denouncing all "capitalism and colonialism", which is ludicrous and hypocritical simultaneously.

    But Sean Penn manipulated a Mexican Actress, who El Chappo had befriended when the actress posted supporting comments of El Chappo and his drug organization and Penn ultimately convinced her to contact El Chappo on his behalf. Through a series of covert messages and encrypted communications, he made arrangements to accompany the Actress from California to Central Mexico and then after a drive of approximately 6 hours and a couple of hours flying in small single engine planes side by side at very low elevation, they landed and were again, driven through the jungle for a couple of hours before he met with El Chappo at a mountain top villa which sounds very modest and extremely remote.

    Frankly, the description of the travels to actually meet with El Chappo are far more interesting and detailed that the actual interview itself. After spending a few hours together during which they spent some time sizing themselves up and then eating together, El Chappo agreed to allow an interview 8 days later. Well, in summary, the 8 days came and went and the in person interview never occurred. After many delays, Penn forwarded a list of questions to El Chappo's people and after more delays, El Chappo's people interviewed him in Spanish and asked very few of Penn's actual questions. Someone videotaped the interview which is all in Spanish and the camera is very unsteady. Nothing new about El Chappo was revealed. The entire video interview is 17 minutes long.

    Surprisingly, El Chappo accepts responsibility for the drug distribution but denies that he is responsible for the associated violence. He claims to never initiate violence and only to "Defend himself". He boasts about the volume of drugs which he has shipped through his group as being more than "half of all sold in the entire world". But he also denies that he is responsible for making this occur and he replies that he is only selling something which others demand. He denies using drugs himself in the last 20 years and says he was never an addict.

    Interestingly, he makes the point that his arrest and subsequent imprisonments have done nothing to either slow or defer any of the sales or distribution of illicit drugs anywhere in the world. He states that when he is dead, drugs will still flow and nothing will change.

    He claims to be extremely close to his mother and children and it sounds as if he has several sons in their early 20's to mid to upper 30's. Frankly, when you read about how he has to live with all of the security and restrictions and constant threats, he is only "free" in that he is not imprisoned within a government facility. But he is certainly someone on the run and always looking over his shoulder extremely closely.

    The only part of the actual "story" which I found interesting was how the communications and other correspondence occurs surrounding El Chappo. I also found El Chappo's naming of many "prominent" Mexican and Multinational Corporations interesting, who's names are specifically deleted from the story, as having laundered his enterprises illicit proceeds and how many have offered to assist him in "laundering the drug proceeds" for a fee, of course, of up to 25%.

    The level of corruption demonstrated in the information provided should surprise no one. The armored plated vehicles known to be those belonging to the Cartel are often waved past "Government Check points". Apparently, they even have contacts within the Mexican Air Force and other branches of the Military which provide them details about when surveillance planes are launched and when the government has special monitoring efforts in place and other key information which permits such movements around the country. They are even provided radar operational details to permit them to fly about. Obviously, money buys whatever information you are willing to pay for.

    Does El Chappo feel responsible for all of the deaths which have occured as a result of his massive drug empire? No, not really as he doesn't control what other people do (so he says). El Chappo is portrayed as a "simple rural Mexican" who had no choice but to go into drugs because of the poverty, which is likely true as there are many who follow his same route to "trafficking" on different scales as he has. The area which El Chappos was raised is extremely poor and offer no opportunities even to this day.

    El Chappo is described as very polite, very self assured but not arrogant and also a "Robin Hood" type figure among many of the Mexican people. Based upon the massive amount who work for him either outright or live on his payroll, it's no wonder he is viewed as such by those who he supports. And then of course, we always have to always keep whatever Sean Penn has said as suspect to it's motives.

    In the end, did I learn anything about El Chappo which I didn't already know or surmise? No. Did anything surprise me? Well, the mere fact that he would risk exposing his location to meet with Penn seems like incredibly poor judgement to me. Clearly, El Chappo has created a Frankenstein of massive global proportions which will likely never be defeated, regardless of the amount of money and government involvement. And like El Chappo himself said, "When he is gone, someone else will just step in and take over."

    Does this mean I condone illegal drugs? Absolutely NOT. I have seen first hand the devastation and destruction which they cause. I have had to help best friends bury their adult children who lost their lives to drug use. Do I support the legalization of drugs? No, but I am also realistic in the fact that just because they are illegal doesn't mean they will be eradicated and cease to exist. Do I condone what El Chappo has done? Of course not, to do so would be to condone all of the violence and destruction of human lives which occurs each second of every day. I would prefer to live in a world where illegal drugs don't exist, but that isn't possible nor is it even a reality.

    Here is a link to the actual 10,000 word interview if you are interested enough to read it yourself.

    El Chapo Speaks | Rolling Stone
    wildbranch2007 likes this.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. Top | #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Last Online
    04-11-2019 @ 09:17 AM
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    1,786
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 167 Times in 140 Posts
    I work in Mexico A LOT. What he says about the drugs flowing after he is gone is 100% accurate - someone else will rise to take his place regardless.

    He was apprehended by the Mexican Marines who are well known to be about the ONLY part of the Mexican armed forces that can't be bought. Don't know why, but that's the case.

    It's also true that he is viewed by many to be a Robin Hood type figure down here.

    In areas where a single cartel is in firm control - there is VERY little crime (petty stuff really), but where the cartels meet it's a freaking warzone and no one is safe.

    I personally think the US should legalize drugs and stop incarcerating people for possession. Legalize, regulate and tax them just like cigarettes and alcohol. If someone wants to kill themselves with drugs, that's their problem. Operating vehicles, etc. under the influence of whatever is already illegal and those disposed to do those kinds of things will do them whether it's legal or not. No different than alcohol.

    THIS is what the "war on drugs" has done to the US. We've created a HUGE population of people with felony convictions which give them a very grim prospect of any kind of success in the future, as no one wants to hire a felon for any kind of decent job. Just like prohibition of alcohol created the like of Al Capone and was a complete failure - so too has prohibition of illicit drugs created El Chapo.

    Just my $0.02
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 693px-US_incarceration_timeline-clean_svg.png  
    Last edited by sstlaure; 01-11-2016 at 04:06 PM.
    BigJim55 and SulleyBear like this.
    -Scott-

    2014 1025R - 60D 7-Iron MMM, H120 53" FEL/Ballast Box, Ken's hooks and Piranha toothbar, BB2048L Boxblade, 54" snowblade Quick-tatch w/full hydraulic lift/tilt.

    You don't have to outrun the bear......just the other campers

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to sstlaure For This Useful Post:

    SulleyBear (01-12-2016)

  5. Top | #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Last Online
    06-23-2016 @ 08:37 PM
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    Posts
    61
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    I was kinda hoping that El Chappo would get his revenge on ISIS like he promised before getting caught. They apparently destroyed one of his shipments and he vowed to get them
    BigJim55 and SulleyBear like this.
    110H, 140H3, 214, 2-300's
    Bigfoot Brent on WFM

  6. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  7. Top | #4
    SulleyBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:10 PM
    Location
    Beautiful beaches, moderated summer heat and lake effect snows. Right where I want to be.
    Posts
    6,971
    Thanks
    1,401
    Thanked 2,487 Times in 1,396 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by sstlaure View Post
    I work in Mexico A LOT. What he says about the drugs flowing after he is gone is 100% accurate - someone else will rise to take his place regardless.

    He was apprehended by the Mexican Marines who are well known to be about the ONLY part of the Mexican armed forces that can't be bought. Don't know why, but that's the case.

    It's also true that he is viewed by many to be a Robin Hood type figure down here.

    In areas where a single cartel is in firm control - there is VERY little crime (petty stuff really), but where the cartels meet it's a freaking warzone and no one is safe.

    I personally think the US should legalize drugs and stop incarcerating people for possession. Legalize, regulate and tax them just like cigarettes and alcohol. If someone wants to kill themselves with drugs, that's their problem. Operating vehicles, etc. under the influence of whatever is already illegal and those disposed to do those kinds of things will do them whether it's legal or not. No different than alcohol.

    THIS is what the "war on drugs" has done to the US. We've created a HUGE population of people with felony convictions which give them a very grim prospect of any kind of success in the future, as no one wants to hire a felon for any kind of decent job. Just like prohibition of alcohol created the like of Al Capone and was a complete failure - so too has prohibition of illicit drugs created El Chapo.

    Just my $0.02
    Ironically, the legalization of marijuana in Colorado and other states (Alaska and I believe Oregon), but I am only going to address Colorado as I have closely followed that states process, results and consequences, has been a boon to the illegal drug trade. Clearly, Colorado has gone to incredible lengths to attempt to regulate the new "legal" production of marijuana even to the point that they bar code everyone of the plants grown legally and closely monitor and track the plants.

    Now I am mentioning this from memory so my actual percentages may not be exact, but the general concept of how Colorado is taxing the legal marijuana is based upon whether you are an approved "Medical marijuana" user or simply a "recreational user", which appears to be anyone who is of legal age and doesn't have the physician issued "Medical marijuana" card. The state imposed tax difference is significant. I believe the "Medical marijuana" users pay a 12% (approximately) state tax on the purchase of marijuana whereas those who are purchasing the marijuana for "recreational purposes" pay a significantly higher tax rate of 35% to 40% (approximately).

    The added taxation means that the illegal cartels were actually able to INCREASE their price because of the added cost of taxes on the legal marijuana. Several illegal drug dealers whom I have seen interviewed were amazed at their windfall because of the legalization and the prices which include the taxation. The issue of actual possession of marijuana doesn't seem to hinge on whether one purchased the product legally or illegally as once one has it, as long as the amount they possess is under the legal limit and for their "personal consumption" the actual source of where the person obtained the marijuana seems irrelevant.

    So this illustrates one of my concerns with the legalization of drugs. It won't cause the "Organized Drug" element to vanish and ironically, there are some people who are likely to try drugs once they are "legal" who wouldn't risk doing so if they had to buy the drugs illicitly. This comment often comes from people who aren't as exposed to the illegal sources and aren't comfortable to attempt to go to the areas where illegal drugs are sold on the street to attempt to acquire the drugs.

    People are going to use drugs whether they are legal or not. I have no confidence in our government and elected officials to make good use of the tax revenue which the legalization of drugs would create. I guess I would describe my opinion about the legalization of drugs as "neutral" since I am neither sold on the idea nor am I completely opposed to it.

    Sadly, I have seen first hand the devastation which drugs do to people, families and society in general. I am not someone who drinks alcohol, although I did more than 20 years ago. I am also not someone who uses illegal drugs, but I certainly know people from all walks of life who do. For those of you who have never seen the show "Drugs, Inc." which I believe is on the National Geographic Channel or Discovery, it is a very interesting show and it shows all of the details which go on at all levels of the illegal drug trade from the major cartel people down to the street corner dealer and also very intimate looks at those who actually use the drugs. A common response from nearly 100% of the people involved in the drug trade at some level is that

    A.) They didn't intentionally choose drugs as a career.
    B.) Virtually all of them would rather be doing something else but the money is too appealing.
    C.) Nearly everyone involved in illegal drugs talks about how they DO NOT want their children in the life.
    D.) Those at some level of an actual drug cartel organization admit that they will never be allowed to leave the drug trade by the higher level traffickers and they accept that they are likely to die a violent death.
    E.) Other then the money they make, nearly every drug dealer talks about how they know they will either end up in jail or dead. A common comment made is "Try and find one former high level drug dealer who is retired". The actual dealers talk about how they have never seen anyone successfully leave the business due to the threats and intimidation.

    So, should we legalize or not? There are pro's and con's for each. The one thing that certainly doesn't seem realistic is the incredible amount of taxpayer money which is spent on enforcement and incarceration and the meager amounts actually seized by the government in forfeitures as compared to the resources spent pursuing and punishing those who are caught.
    BigJim55 likes this.

  8. Top | #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Last Online
    04-11-2019 @ 09:17 AM
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    1,786
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 167 Times in 140 Posts
    FYI....The full legalization of drugs in Mexico is currently working it's way through their Supreme Court.
    BigJim55 and SulleyBear like this.
    -Scott-

    2014 1025R - 60D 7-Iron MMM, H120 53" FEL/Ballast Box, Ken's hooks and Piranha toothbar, BB2048L Boxblade, 54" snowblade Quick-tatch w/full hydraulic lift/tilt.

    You don't have to outrun the bear......just the other campers

  9. Top | #6
    HydroHarold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Last Online
    06-28-2019 @ 11:07 PM
    Location
    Mid Hudson Valley NY
    Posts
    3,554
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 332 Times in 253 Posts
    I'm thinking maybe the Pennster should be looking over his shoulder every minute of every day! His interview had to have led to the little Chappo lad being re-busted. Since it will take "...at least a year for extradition from our "partner Mexico" he will probably avail himself once again of the less than stellar Mexican security holding facilities.

    As long as there's users there'll be suppliers. Nobody in the last 40 years in government really "wanted" to do anything about sales to minors, etc. The cash flow lines the lawmaker's pockets directly and indirectly hence the lack of action. I lost 3 friends over the years, 2 to weed and 1 to LSD (man can't fly off high buildings unaided) and none, zero, naught... to booze. I also believe as the legal smokers keep smoking junk from an earlier and earlier ages we'll lose them quicker and younger to lung related issues, which is OK in my book. I've not really heard anyone say, "Man, I want my kids to do that same stuff I've done!", maybe I'm missing something... but, I don't think so.

    Legalize ALL DRUGS! Giive 'em all they want free in fenced controlled areas and let them use themselves up with the stuff where they can't bother me. It will quickly weed out the one's that can't "say no". Sooner or later the public will see the madness and stop it when half their families are dying or dead.

    Talk about "Mass Extinctions", maybe it won't be a comet afterall...
    SulleyBear likes this.
    2013(12) 1026r TLB 54 QH front blade, 54D Auto Connect deck, ballast box, carryall

    '04 GX335, 48C, Johnny Bucket Jr., PowerFlow W/7bu. bagger, 42 snow blower, 48 Plow, JD front dethatcher, 10 Cart, Little-Brown Henway, Stihl 026P/20", Stihl 241/16", Stihl BG 85 blower, Stihl KombiMotor 110 w/string trimmer/brush cutter/edger/pole saw/hedge trimmer, Snapper 21" WB, Snapper 8/24 snow blower

    "...and visions of green CUT sugarplums dance in his head..."

    NRA Life Member

  10. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •