Diesel Engines Too,,, OR Gas Engines Only??
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Thread: Diesel Engines Too,,, OR Gas Engines Only??

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    Diesel Engines Too,,, OR Gas Engines Only??

    I just got back from a quick store/post office run,,, IT IS COLD OUTSIDE!!

    Most times,, I do not pass people on the road I travel,, but,
    it seems when it is this cold (close to single digits!!), other people want to drive REAL slow,,,

    Today, I passed 4 different cars,, they were driving about 20 MPH (my tractor will go faster than that)

    Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
    the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

    The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
    I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

    The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

    So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold??
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    Senior GTT Super Slacker Gizmo2's Avatar
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    John Deere 1025R TLB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CADplans View Post
    I just got back from a quick store/post office run,,, IT IS COLD OUTSIDE!!

    Most times,, I do not pass people on the road I travel,, but,
    it seems when it is this cold (close to single digits!!), other people want to drive REAL slow,,,

    Today, I passed 4 different cars,, they were driving about 20 MPH (my tractor will go faster than that)

    Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
    the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

    The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
    I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

    The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

    So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold??
    The boost in power may be due to the density of the air. When air is extremely cold it is much more dense(more Oxygen per given volume of air) than when warm, so you get the boost similarly to if you had a pressurized intake like a turbo. As long as the engine computer recognizes that the engine has swallowed a more dense charge of air(more O2), it is probably injecting additional fuel.
    You would probably see the same boost with diesel, however you have the extreme cold fighting against you, as a diesel utilizes heat to create ignition rather than spark. You are still gaining the advantage of the dense air, but being more dense and extremely cold, it is also cooling the cylinder better, decreasing it's effect. Also my tractor does not adjust the fuel for the temperature of the air, so there would not be any increase in fuel, so the air to fuel mixture is slightly leaner.

    The above is conjecture on my part. I do not know that your truck being a 99 has the ability to adjust fuel based on air charge density. So what I wrote may be just so much BS. Perhaps someone else will chime in and correct my statements.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CADplans View Post
    Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
    the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

    The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
    I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

    The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

    So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold??
    Probably cause there is ice on the road.....




    I cant say I have ever seen a increase in power when its cold.. I would say the colder air entering the intake would gain some performance, might even be enough to feel.

    Also, if you had your truck since 1999, there was no 6.0 engine back then..
    Last edited by NEWT; 02-13-2016 at 11:04 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CADplans View Post
    I just got back from a quick store/post office run,,, IT IS COLD OUTSIDE!!

    Most times,, I do not pass people on the road I travel,, but,
    it seems when it is this cold (close to single digits!!), other people want to drive REAL slow,,,

    Today, I passed 4 different cars,, they were driving about 20 MPH (my tractor will go faster than that)

    Anyways,, I have had my truck since 1999,, and I notice that when it is this cold,,
    the 6.0 liter engine REALLY puts out the power,,, easily 10% more horsepower.

    The truck is rated at 300 HP,,, but, when the air is this cold,, the engine has CRAZY horsepower.
    I mean neck snapping HP,, something you do not expect in a pickup.

    The truck goes good in normal temps,, but,, at these temps, it goes to 70 MPH like RIGHT NOW!!

    So, my question is,, does a diesel experience this "boost" of horsepower in extreme cold??

    One of the ways to boost power on a race car is to install an intercooler and make sure the fuel and the air being injected is as cold as possible. That is why you will see us dumping bags of ice in the Intercooler when drag racing.There is a show on one of the channels about Street Racing (which is actually filmed on a closed course) where the guys have large aluminum intercoolers in the trunks of their drag cars which they are dumping bags of crushed ice into. Same exact thing.--- As stated already, the colder the air and fuel, the denser it is when forced into the intake system, whether it is a super charger, or other induction assistance aid.Many Tractor Pullers often do the exact same thing if they are using s Super Charger or Turbo's.

    Or perhaps you have a cold weather Nitrous Oxide kit installed on your truck that you are not aware of. But the bottles have to be refilled so after a short while, you would notice.....I am just kidding about the NOS kit on your truck.

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    Adding to what SulleyBear says about gas engines - diesels want cold air. Look at any modern big truck - if it has a turbo it has an aftercooler.

    I think the OP experienced the computer on his vehicle adding more fuel for combustion because of the cold air.

    And people driving slowly - when I first start out when it is really cold I take it really easy. Even though I warm the engine up that does not warm the trans, transfer case, rear end, etc. I can feel how stiff they are and take it easy for the first 5 miles or so. But I won't get out there and do 25mph on a 55mph road......
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Deere 1025R TLB View Post
    The boost in power may be due to the density of the air. When air is extremely cold it is much more dense(more Oxygen per given volume of air) than when warm, so you get the boost similarly to if you had a pressurized intake like a turbo. As long as the engine computer recognizes that the engine has swallowed a more dense charge of air(more O2), it is probably injecting additional fuel.
    You would probably see the same boost with diesel, however you have the extreme cold fighting against you, as a diesel utilizes heat to create ignition rather than spark. You are still gaining the advantage of the dense air, but being more dense and extremely cold, it is also cooling the cylinder better, decreasing it's effect. Also my tractor does not adjust the fuel for the temperature of the air, so there would not be any increase in fuel, so the air to fuel mixture is slightly leaner.

    The above is conjecture on my part. I do not know that your truck being a 99 has the ability to adjust fuel based on air charge density. So what I wrote may be just so much BS. Perhaps someone else will chime in and correct my statements.
    You are dead on, the dense air increases power. In racing Density Altitude is referred to quite often trying to make comparisons between different areas, temps, etc a little more easily compatible.

    My Trailblazer was a consistent 11.9 sec 1/4 mile rig. One fall the track opened for a special track day, it was very cool and the DA was sky high. I had to retune and add gobs of fuel. Went 11.1. Nearly a second faster.
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    John Deere 1025R TLB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psrumors View Post
    You are dead on, the dense air increases power. In racing Density Altitude is referred to quite often trying to make comparisons between different areas, temps, etc a little more easily compatible.

    My Trailblazer was a consistent 11.9 sec 1/4 mile rig. One fall the track opened for a special track day, it was very cool and the DA was sky high. I had to retune and add gobs of fuel. Went 11.1. Nearly a second faster.
    I probably should have added that the diesel would see the increase when it is fully warmed, provided it has the ability to add the extra fuel. But the 1025R ain't that sophisticated. Big rigs are a totally different animal and most likely would have the ability to add extra fuel when required. Not sure, but it seems logical. At least up to the point of the limitations of the design parameter of the engine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEWT View Post

    Also, if you had your truck since 1999, there was no 6.0 engine back then..
    It is a '99,, and it has the 6.0 liter 300 HP, 4.10 axle,,, and a snow plow option package,,, (no snow plow,,, though)



    There were only 7 of these in the state of Virginia when we bought it,, it was brand new.

    Quote Originally Posted by SulleyBear View Post

    Or perhaps you have a cold weather Nitrous Oxide kit installed on your truck that you are not aware of. But the bottles have to be refilled so after a short while, you would notice.....I am just kidding about the NOS kit on your truck.
    Do you see a nitrous package in there anywhere??



    I would bet there is a street rodder somewhere waiting for my truck to wear out,
    so they can get the engine for their build,,,

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    Quote Originally Posted by CADplans View Post
    It is a '99,, and it has the 6.0 liter 300 HP, 4.10 axle,,, and a snow plow option package,,, (no snow plow,,, though) I would bet there is a street rodder somewhere waiting for my truck to wear out,
    so they can get the engine for their build,,,
    Had the 6.0 in my Hummer H2 and it was a good motor. I added a supercharger Kit and changed the exhaust manifolds to Edelbrock Ceramic coated headers and also used the aftermarket CPU "Modifier". Added a fresh air kit for the cooler air. Put on a Borla Dual exhaust kit and the truck dyno'ed at 468 HP......Improved the drive ability and the fuel mileage went up significantly, when I wasn't driving with my foot to the floor. It went from 10 mpg stock to about 15.5 mpg after the changes.

    Now, with the price of crate motors which are ready to go out of the box, many builds of street rods, etc,. don't even bother with motors which have lot's of miles on them. You can buy a ready to go motor which has been run on the dyno and tuned for $4,500 and up. It's not cost effective to pay for the machining and rebuild on motors with lot's of miles like it used to be.

    Crate Engines/Motors at Summit Racing

    Most of the new crate motors will also come with a warranty on them, even some of the motors used in racing, which is hard to believe, but they do it.

    Drag Racing Engines by Engine Builder Steve Schmidt
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