Bent or cantered forward ROPS
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Thread: Bent or cantered forward ROPS

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    Bent or cantered forward ROPS

    Hi All
    Just curious.When did JD go from the straight ROPS to the bent or cantered forward ROPS
    regards John

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    late 2017 to 2018.
    Last edited by jimmylh; 05-29-2019 at 04:44 AM.
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    2xxx series, 2006 or before.
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    Hi All
    Sorry I was referring to the 1025R. Mine was delivered in 2014 and is pictured below, as you can see it has the cantered forward ROPS as OE. Why were export models fitted with this ROPS before US models?
    regards John
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    Likely government red tape.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John 54 View Post
    Hi All
    Sorry I was referring to the 1025R. Mine was delivered in 2014 and is pictured below, as you can see it has the cantered forward ROPS as OE. Why were export models fitted with this ROPS before US models?
    regards John
    A better question is WHY does JD keep flip-flopping back and forth on ROPS design? The 1-series started with a straight ROPS and then later switched to a forward-cantered design. The earlier compacts and 2-series (including models that were basically sub-compacts before there was a sub-compact category) started out with straight ROPS, then switched to forward-cantered ROPS and now are back to straight ROPS.


    It really makes you scratch your head. I have a 2-series with the forward-cantered ROPS and dislike it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John 54 View Post
    Hi All
    Sorry I was referring to the 1025R. Mine was delivered in 2014 and is pictured below, as you can see it has the cantered forward ROPS as OE. Why were export models fitted with this ROPS before US models?
    regards John
    The ROPS are designed to provide the protective area for the operator and in the USA, the ROPS on tractors over 20 horsepower have been an OSHA requirement for all tractors operated by hired help since 1976.

    There are several U.S. governmental and private agencies involved in the ROPS regulations. Occupational Safety and Hazard Act (OSHA) is the Federal agency which regulates employee safety and in the USA, the OSHA regulations require the use of the ROPS after 1976 for employees. The actual organization who is responsible for the design and safety certification of the ROPS is the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). The SAE is a U.S based, globally active organization which provides membership to individuals and not organizations. It is a private membership based organization (not government affiliated) that is active globally and now has about 135,000 members.

    While the SAE standards are often accepted and recognized globally, each nation likely has their own version of OSHA, which is the regulatory side of the matter. In the U.S., OSHA is most often thought of by employers as the governmental agency who investigates workplace accidents and deaths of those who are employed by others. They also are the enforcement arm for the Federal government in issuing fines and sanctions for failing to comply with or follow the laws and regulations governing workplace safety.

    As an interesting side note, in the U.S. as manufacturing jobs declined in the early 2000's due to globalization and massive importation of products made in other nations, OSHA began expanding their compliance supervision of much smaller companies in the U.S., such as roofers, tree workers, etc. and began aggressively enforcing such safety requirements as "fall prevention harnesses, safety lines and anchoring systems". This has resulted in many very small employers being fined sometimes with fines which effectively put the employer out of business.

    Since the design and safety standards are largely U.S. based with the SAE ROPS certification, your question does leave one scratching their head as the U.S. based machines were years behind in the installation of what now seems to be the ROPS standard for use on John Deere machines. The ROPS certification does apply to each machine, so various manufacturers use the designs which provide the best occupant protection for their machines. This can result in the actual ROPS design varying by machine simply to provide the required operator protection.

    The ROPS certification process and designs have evolved with the machine design and style changes. Perhaps a combination of Australia's version of OSHA and the requirements for both workplace and tractor operator were adopted sooner than in the USA. Or, maybe John Deere used the international market as their "test market" with their customers to see the response to the new design and then eventually implemented the design in the USA. After all, the domestic market for these SCUTS and CUTS is HUGE and very competitive and perhaps (this is only speculation) before John Deere released a ROPS which customers found objectionable and tended to drive them to other brands of tractors, they wanted to see how the end user customer would respond to the new design.

    The entire ROPS issue is ever changing and impacted by standards and regulations which keep expanding to provide operator safety. Originally, when the ROPS was required by OSHA, it was for machines 20 hp or more and for those which were operated by employees. Now the regulation applies to all machines, regardless of the operator is the owner or an employee of the machine owner. Also, the ROPS requirement in the USA has expanded to machines like Zero Turn mowers and other "non tractor" machines and the use on those machines is determined by the machines weight, not its horsepower, as was the case originally on tractors.

    The reading about the ROPS provided some interesting facts about tractor use and safety in the USA. For example,

    - 80% of all tractor related accidents involve operators who are "experienced or very experienced" in the use of the machine

    - The dynamic test involves hitting the tractor ROPS in a prescribed manner with a 4,410 pound pendulum weight from behind and from both sides (but not from the front). In order for a ROPS to pass the dynamic test, the ROPS protective zone must remain intact and maintain the specified distances from the operator.

    - There is actually a FOPS standard, for "Falling Objects Protective Structures" for protecting those operating in environments with such risks.

    - Factory installed ROPS will have a certification label attached to the roll bar stating that the roll bar meets SAE/ASAE/OSHA standards.

    -

    • The tractor is the leading cause of death on the farm.
    • Tractors in the Northeast states have the highest rate of overturn deaths and the lowest percentage of tractors with ROPS.
    • The use of ROPS and a seat belt is estimated to be 99% effective in preventing death or serious injury in the event of a tractor rollover.


    So as to why the forward facing ROPS in your country years before it's use in the USA, I can only speculate and I found nothing which would provide a specific reason. However, I also didn't research the regulations and requirements of any nation outside of the USA, so perhaps the answer lies there.

    One very important point which is made over and over when reading and researching about this issue is that anytime the machine rolls over, the ROPS MUST BE REPLACED. Often, owners and operators have suggested "having the ROPS inspected" after use and the SAE and OSHA are very clear that anytime the ROPS makes impact with the ground and it utilized in a roll over incident, the entire structure and hardware MUST be replaced to maintain the proper safety standards. By design the ROPS bends and flexes during a roll over incident and this single incident use is enough to impair the ROPS from properly providing occupant safety in the event of another rollover incident.

    I do know that the forward facing design has not been favored by many / most who own these machines. Just as the fold-able ROPS was designed and implemented due to safety issues found with the stationary ROPS, perhaps the same is the case for the new forward facing ROPS as well, based upon the specific machines most popular use and issues with maintaining that occupant safety zone when the machine does roll over.

    It appears the forward cantered ROPS would provide a larger occupant safety zone and on the 1025R in the USA, the top of the forward cantered ROPS is taller than the previous design, which ironically is resulting in the now infamous "GTT Garage Door Header Collision Club" rapidly gaining members.......
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