1025r Mauser cab Winter Operation
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Thread: 1025r Mauser cab Winter Operation

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    1025r Mauser cab Winter Operation

    I posted a thread about heat issues in the Mauser cab last winter and again winter is just around the corner and I’m looking for suggestions.

    My tractor runs great in the summer and winter. However, it does not build enough heat at temperatures lower than 0DegreesF to really get the benefits you should with a Mauser cab.
    The owners manual specifically cautions about blocking airflow to the radiator. In the northern states this has been a normal thing to do in cars in years gone by. Changing the thermostat to a higher temperature one for winter seems to be what John Deere expects you to do if you want more heat in the cab. Weather fronts were common on trucks years ago but no longer seem to be necessary. How did the trucking industry solve this problem?

    Blocking the radiator in extreme cold doesn’t cause the engine to overheat in the hour or two needed to move snow. Moving snow is not like mowing grass. Mowing grass is done at high RPM while moving snow rarely requires high RPM under most conditions. Even at high RPM’s the ambient temperature of -20F still dissipates the heat well enough to barely move the temperature gauge off the bottom.

    What can be damaged by partially or fully blocking the radiator if the engine is not overheating? Wouldn’t it actually be worse for a Diesel engine to NOT achieve normal operating temperature for an hour or two?
    BigJim55, jdforever and Toughsox like this.
    2018 John Deere 1025r, Mauser cab, rear wiper, rear light, FEL, Piranah tooth bar, Heavy Hitch weight bar, 8 suitcase weights, 55 amp alternator, Kens hooks and seat springs, 54” MMM, 66” Loader mounted CTA plow, Artillian 3d function diverter kit. New Green equipment =less green in investments

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    Ray_PA's Avatar
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    Bottom line, blocking off the radiator doesn't damage the engine, overheating is what damages the engine.

    Now, the issue is, if you block off the radiator, you are going to have to watch your temp gauge to make sure you didn't block off too much. So, the question is, will you watch the gauge to make sure it does not overheat. If you can, go for it.

    It is very normal for a diesel engine to not generator much heat in the cold temps, as the heat in the engine is absorbed by combustion and the heat is evacuated in the exhaust. Because the ambient temp is low around the engine, the engine itself is not getting super hot in the cold temps. Now, just because the engine does not get super hot does not mean combustion temps are low.

    You cannot evaluate the actual engine temp of a diesel engine the same as a gasoline engine. Diesels, it is more about combustion temps which results in exhaust temps.

    This is why pyrometers are used on diesel engines that have been fueled up to increase HP. Exhaust temps are the big deal on a diesel.

    So, what can you do to increase actual engine temps, block of some of the radiator. Start with closing a portion of the radiator and see how that works. If not enough, close of slightly more. Again, you will have to watch the temp gauge.
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    martincom's Avatar
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    I only owned a Mauser cab briefly--till I found it wouldn't clear the supplemental backhoe frame mounts. In that period, I noted a few things that were of concern in regards to the heater installation:

    1. The size of the heater hoses were rather small. I'm thinking 3/8" hose or a metric equivalent a bit larger. I found out the hard and cold way that the diameter of the heater supply lines is critical when I got cheap setting up a service truck (step van) build. I reduced the size of the pipe feeding the rear heater from 3/4 to 1/2. It made a huge difference in the lack of heater performance.

    I'd research if it is possible to fish a larger diameter hose up the cab pillars to the heater core. If not, I'd run larger hose, 5/8", to the bottom of the pillars and then reduce down.

    2. The Mauser cab installation instructions have the heater feed connecting to the block drain plug location. This would result in coolant being fed to the heater that was just introduced into the engine block from the radiator. I'd change this so the connection was at the top of the block, just before heated the coolant is returned to the radiator or re-circulated if the thermostat is closed. See this thread I authored for details.

    I ended up utilizing the Cozy Cabs, the heater is not huge by any means. However, it will cook me out of the cab. I typically have the water valve partially closed to limit the flow and, in turn, the heat output. The fan is almost always on low, unless I'm trying to clear the glass.

    My other complaint with the Cozy heater is that it just re-circulates air in the cab. It doesn't draw, fresh, outside, air into the cab. Outside air is very dry, low humidity, in the winter, so it keeps the windows from fogging. I believe the Mauser heater does draw outside air, so that is a big plus, in my opinion. If you up the coolant flow and temperature, I believe you'll have a winning combination.
    Last edited by martincom; 08-31-2019 at 08:40 AM.
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    I wonder if running it closer to PTO engine speed would be enough. I have to use high rpm with my 2305 for the snow blower and no heat issues with the tektite cab and heater.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportshot2 View Post
    Weather fronts were common on trucks years ago but no longer seem to be necessary. How did the trucking industry solve this problem?
    I don't deal with larger trucks but I suspect they did the same thing that rest of the auto industry did. If you look at (or recall) the cars of the '50s, '60s and early 70s, the radiator cooling fan ran the entire time the engine was running. In the latter 70s/early 80s, they started putting in fan clutches so the fan would kick in/out at specific RPMs. Now all the fans seem to be electric. They put a temp sensor on the radiator and the fan only comes on when the radiator reaches a specified temp.
    Levi, BigJim55, jdforever and 3 others like this.
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    SulleyBear's Avatar
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    If I were you I would check to make sure the valve for the coolant flow is opening all the way in the cab roof. I found my valve was only opening about 60 percent when I got it based upon how the cable was adjusted for the roof temp control for the heater. Once I adjusted the cable to open the valve 100%, I haven't been able to run my heater on high ever since.

    In fact, I run the valve about 1/2 into the red and its produces 72 degrees in the cab in most of our weather. Now, we don't get the extreme cold often, like you do, because of the massive amount of lake water just west of my location. It keeps the winter temps warmer and the summer temps cooler, which is part of what I really like about this area. The typical outside temps when I am plowing are in the upper teens to the low to mid 20's.

    I find I only need to block the radiator in EXTREME conditions, well, extreme for our area. If its 0 degrees or above, I can't even run my heater on high and I don't wear a coat in the cab, just a long sleeved wicking shirt with another wicking long sleeve shirt over it. The coat hangs in the corner of the cab till I get out......

    I will and have blocked the radiator in extreme cold and wouldn't hesitate to do so again. Switching to the higher thermostat would increase the heat slightly, but lets face it, if 160 degrees isn't producing enough heat in the cab, 180 degrees isn't going to boil you out of the cab.

    I actually measured the coolant temps in the radiator last winter using the laser temp gun when we had the -30 degree air temps here and the 25 to 35 MPH winds, which made the windchill below -55. The coolant temp dropped like a rock once it hit the top of the radiator because of the extremely cold air being pulled through the radiator. When I saw that happening, I was more concerned about the effect on the engine of the dramatically colder water coming back through it, verses too much heat being in the engine should I block off the air flow to the radiator.

    How you block off the airflow is critical, in my opinion. I don't block the radiator's air source from the outside air, but you could. I used Mountain Dew case cardboard and wrapped the radiator screen, front and back, so that I was preventing the fan from pulling the cold air through the radiator.

    This doesn't block the radiator from cooling as it might if you put the cardboard against the front of the radiator itself, which I would refrain from doing. I prefer this approach as the radiator isn't impaired at all in its cooling. The thickness of the Mountain Dew case cardboard allowed me to wrap the screen and still have it fit in the slots in the radiator. Just don't wrap the outer edges of the screen on both the front and back and it will slide right back into place and be nice and snug.

    This approach allows the radiator to still cool, which is important. I did the same thing with my 455 without the cab, just to keep the engine temp warmer and it worked well. On that tractor, since it draws all of the air through the dash right in front of the operator, I also blocked the side panels by inserting cut out cardboard inside the side panel vents, where the air is drawn in. Just make sure to remove this when the season is over or you will cause the temps to be too high and overheat the engine.......
    Levi, mark02tj, jdmich and 4 others like this.

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    [QUOTE=vt2305;3332722]I wonder if running it closer to PTO engine speed would be enough. I have to use high rpm with my 2305 for the snow blower and no heat issues with the tektite cab and heater.

    I tried running it at high rpm and it made little difference. The cooling system must be designed for summer heat and chaff clogged screens
    vt2305, Levi, SulleyBear and 1 others like this.
    2018 John Deere 1025r, Mauser cab, rear wiper, rear light, FEL, Piranah tooth bar, Heavy Hitch weight bar, 8 suitcase weights, 55 amp alternator, Kens hooks and seat springs, 54” MMM, 66” Loader mounted CTA plow, Artillian 3d function diverter kit. New Green equipment =less green in investments

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    Busman's Avatar
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    I have a Mauser cab and last winter I changed my thermostat to the 180. F . Made it warmer. With these little tractors/engines, every little bit helps.
    And because I live close to the North Pole, it's really cold up here with our 7-8 months of winter.
    Last edited by Busman; 08-31-2019 at 05:23 PM.
    Glen

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    2018 - JD 1025R w/Mauser Cab

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    I havent seen anyone mention it yet but, why not install an engine block heater as well so that the engine is warm right from the get-go? Diesels do take awhile to warm up so Im just thinking on it being warm before you even start it up.
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    I also went with a 180 degree thermostat, made a big difference, I have a cozy cab on my 1025r and the small heater works very well, would be better if it did pull outside air as in the factory cabs, but it does a good job, but my tractors are in a heated shop, so they start out warm when I go out
    Levi, jdforever, Busman and 3 others like this.

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