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    DanW's Avatar
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    tire pressure

    I did a search but couldn't find any recent threads on this. The threads I did find seemed to be more concerned about proper inflation for heavy loader work.

    My back is still sore from mowing yesterday. One thing I learned with my 3/4 ton pickup was the easiest way to soften the unloaded ride was to air down the tires a little. You don't need max inflation without a load. So, just curious what pressure my fellow SCUT owners are running in their rears to soften the ride. I have a 1023e running the stock Carlisle R4's with a max rated pressure of 20psi, currently inflated to 17.5. How low do you think I can safely go? I understand I'll have to air back up before using the loader but for mowing and snow removal, do I really need to run the current pressure?

    Thanks.
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    Efficiency is just intelligent laziness

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanW View Post
    I did a search but couldn't find any recent threads on this. The threads I did find seemed to be more concerned about proper inflation for heavy loader work.

    My back is still sore from mowing yesterday. One thing I learned with my 3/4 ton pickup was the easiest way to soften the unloaded ride was to air down the tires a little. You don't need max inflation without a load. So, just curious what pressure my fellow SCUT owners are running in their rears to soften the ride. I have a 1023e running the stock Carlisle R4's with a max rated pressure of 20psi, currently inflated to 17.5. How low do you think I can safely go? I understand I'll have to air back up before using the loader but for mowing and snow removal, do I really need to run the current pressure?

    Thanks.
    Dan Iím no expert. I simply look at the pressure thatís written on the tire itself and fill it to that tires pressure which is the pressure that the manufacturer specifies. During changes in season, I check and adjust to manufacturers pressure. I donít inflate or deflate for sand, snow or mud etc. I honestly feel itís best to inflate to the pressure the tire says and keep it there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firemark View Post
    Dan I’m no expert. I simply look at the pressure that’s written on the tire itself and fill it to that tires pressure which is the pressure that the manufacturer specifies. During changes in season, I check and adjust to manufacturers pressure. I don’t inflate or deflate for sand, snow or mud etc. I honestly feel it’s best to inflate to the pressure the tire says and keep it there.
    If you ever take notice of the axle ratings on the door pillar of your vehicle, you'll notice the weight is specified for a certain size tire at a specified pressure. Ideally, the pressure in your tire matches the load it's carrying. Here's a chart from Michelin for the size tires I have on my truck.

    Click image for larger version.†

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    They're rated 3415 lbs at 80 PSI, but if the load is only 3000lbs/tire (6000/axle) the ideal pressure for tire wear would be 65 psi. Or put another way with 65 psi in the tires they're only rated for 3000 lbs. Too much weight for a certain inflation pressure causes more sidewall flex and tire heating. Alternatively, too much inflation pressure for a certain load will cause tread bulge and you'll wear the center of the tread faster than the sides. Provided you're not exceeding the load for your inflation pressure, lowering the pressure is the easiest way I've found to soften the ride.
    Last edited by DanW; 09-08-2019 at 12:13 PM.
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    Rule of thumb is to never look at the sidewall of a tire for inflation psi. Far too often this happens in the automobile/light truck world . I'm not even going to mention trailers. Tires are marked by standards for inflation at max load etc. You are correct in stating that the manual cares about adding psi for FEL/BH (again because of adding weight or load) You obviously noticed there is no min. spec. If the SAE/manufacturers care so much about about adding.....why don't they care about subtracting? get you thinking yet?

    Anyway....
    1st question- filled or not?

    2nd -additional weight other than MMM?

    3rd- what is max psi for an unloaded 1023?

    I recommend cut that number in half and setting tires there.

    View sidewalls for deflection (bulge at sidewall).

    If necessary add air equally to start removing bulge.

    Spray paint a 4 inch bar across the tread width and use the tractor under YOUR normal circumstances.

    The paint should be worn off equally across the section width. add or subtract as needed for equal wear to occur..........Then, tell us what the pressure was. Please.
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    Quote Originally Posted by redshale View Post
    Rule of thumb is to never look at the sidewall of a tire for inflation psi. Far too often this happens in the automobile/light truck world . I'm not even going to mention trailers. Tires are marked by standards for inflation at max load etc. You are correct in stating that the manual cares about adding psi for FEL/BH (again because of adding weight or load) You obviously noticed there is no min. spec. If the SAE/manufacturers care so much about about adding.....why don't they care about subtracting? get you thinking yet?

    Anyway....
    1st question- filled or not?

    2nd -additional weight other than MMM?

    3rd- what is max psi for an unloaded 1023?

    I recommend cut that number in half and setting tires there.

    View sidewalls for deflection (bulge at sidewall).

    If necessary add air equally to start removing bulge.

    Spray paint a 4 inch bar across the tread width and use the tractor under YOUR normal circumstances.

    The paint should be worn off equally across the section width. add or subtract as needed for equal wear to occur..........Then, tell us what the pressure was. Please.
    1 - unfilled

    2 - just my 250 lbs. When I plow (Deere 60" QH mounted blade) I'll probably have the ballast box on so there's another roughly 450 lbs

    3 - the sidewall is marked 20 psi max

    I was thinking of backing it down to 10 but thought I'd ask those that have been using these things for a while first in case anyone else already found the lower limit.

    Re: Spray paint, I must be getting old (a given). I completely forgot about that trick. Though I'd always heard use a piece of a chalk to mark a line across the treads and take it for a short drive. Chalk will wear off faster than paint. Now, I need to find some chalk...

    PS: While plowing I'll be on blacktop so a stiffer ride isn't a concern.
    Last edited by DanW; 09-08-2019 at 12:37 PM. Reason: added PS
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    I donít have a 1 series but a 2....

    I ran with 20# in the rear tires for years. Couldnít take the ride anymore so dropped them to 10#. World of difference!

    In the winter I bump them back up to 20#.

    The one thing to watch is that your wheels donít slip inside the tires. When running too low a pressure the bead can slip. But I doubt that would happen at 10#. That is why I go back to 20# in the winter as tires will inherently loose pressure in the cold.

    My experience in the ride might be different than yours as my rear tires are about 3 times the size of yours. But what does it hurt to try? Only takes a minute or so.
    ~Stan~
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    Of your like me and your garage floor is dirty after mowing tires are cleanish a few rotations on the concrete you can see what is touching.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanW View Post
    I did a search but couldn't find any recent threads on this. The threads I did find seemed to be more concerned about proper inflation for heavy loader work.

    My back is still sore from mowing yesterday. One thing I learned with my 3/4 ton pickup was the easiest way to soften the unloaded ride was to air down the tires a little. You don't need max inflation without a load. So, just curious what pressure my fellow SCUT owners are running in their rears to soften the ride. I have a 1023e running the stock Carlisle R4's with a max rated pressure of 20psi, currently inflated to 17.5. How low do you think I can safely go? I understand I'll have to air back up before using the loader but for mowing and snow removal, do I really need to run the current pressure?

    Thanks.

    I thought the same thing when I bought my 2011 F250. However, the TPMS would not let me run with lowered air pressure, at least not enough to make a difference. So now I run 80 in the rears and 65 in the front as specified on the door panel sticker. At least, I am always ready to haul or tow.

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    Dae I have a 2012 F250 and that thing is a back breaker running the country roads empty with 80 psi in the rear. I went back to the good ole boy service manger and he said that if I came back tomorrow his "computer guy" would be in and he could fix me up.


    So i went back and he cranked those TPMS numbers to my liking. i been know to let those back ones down to 50. Just FYI.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanW View Post
    I did a search but couldn't find any recent threads on this. The threads I did find seemed to be more concerned about proper inflation for heavy loader work.

    My back is still sore from mowing yesterday.
    One thing I learned with my 3/4 ton pickup was the easiest way to soften the unloaded ride was to air down the tires a little. You don't need max inflation without a load. So, just curious what pressure my fellow SCUT owners are running in their rears to soften the ride. I have a 1023e running the stock Carlisle R4's with a max rated pressure of 20psi, currently inflated to 17.5. How low do you think I can safely go? I understand I'll have to air back up before using the loader but for mowing and snow removal, do I really need to run the current pressure?

    Thanks.

    Are you bottoming out on bumps? There are stiffer seat springs if you want to go that route!! I know my #230 lbs make for a harsh ride when the seat hits bottom.... considering stiffer springs myself.

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    DanW likes this.
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