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    meyer1025r's Avatar
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    Cool down

    I have a 1025r, wondering how long you should let it cool down before you shut it off?? Thanks.

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    Keeper of the GTT Cookies dieselshadow's Avatar
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    A few minutes should suffice just fine. It's a good idea to make sure the radiator screen is clear so you have effective cooling during that period of time.
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    Bonehead Club Lackey Levi's Avatar
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    If the temp is normal then mine gets about 10 seconds worth. Long enough to drive it into the garage at idle.
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    JKR
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    As long as the temp gauge is at the normal temp. Turn it off.
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    Hiya,

    If you used it hard, let it idle for a few minutes to dissipate the heat in the head, otherwise if it's in the normal temp range, shut 'er down.

    The larger turbo-charged tractors are the ones that really need to idle for a while to cool before they are shut down. The heat in the turbo housing needs to dissipate before the oil stops flowing or else it will cook in the housing and ruin the bearing. (Some larger equipment have battery powered pumps that turn on after the engine is shut down to pump oil to the turbo to cool it)

    Tom
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    meyer1025r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomd999 View Post
    Hiya,

    If you used it hard, let it idle for a few minutes to dissipate the heat in the head, otherwise if it's in the normal temp range, shut 'er down.

    The larger turbo-charged tractors are the ones that really need to idle for a while to cool before they are shut down. The heat in the turbo housing needs to dissipate before the oil stops flowing or else it will cook in the housing and ruin the bearing. (Some larger equipment have battery powered pumps that turn on after the engine is shut down to pump oil to the turbo to cool it)

    Tom
    Thanks for all the advice, I just wanted to make sure I didn't reck anything, this site is great.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomd999 View Post
    Hiya,

    If you used it hard, let it idle for a few minutes to dissipate the heat in the head, otherwise if it's in the normal temp range, shut 'er down.

    The larger turbo-charged tractors are the ones that really need to idle for a while to cool before they are shut down. The heat in the turbo housing needs to dissipate before the oil stops flowing or else it will cook in the housing and ruin the bearing. (Some larger equipment have battery powered pumps that turn on after the engine is shut down to pump oil to the turbo to cool it)

    Tom
    Yep, Tom is correct.
    Turbo charged engines need a more thorough cool down phase.
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    JKR
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomd999 View Post
    Hiya,

    If you used it hard, let it idle for a few minutes to dissipate the heat in the head, otherwise if it's in the normal temp range, shut 'er down.

    The larger turbo-charged tractors are the ones that really need to idle for a while to cool before they are shut down. The heat in the turbo housing needs to dissipate before the oil stops flowing or else it will cook in the housing and ruin the bearing. (Some larger equipment have battery powered pumps that turn on after the engine is shut down to pump oil to the turbo to cool it)

    Tom
    I agree but if it has a intercooler. The water cooler will run after the tractor is turn off. This will cool the turbo down. Then the temp sender will turn off the intercooler.
    That's how it works on cars.
    Levi likes this.
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    Keeper of the GTT Cookies dieselshadow's Avatar
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    Cars and tractors are a lot different. An intercooler is usually an air-to-air radiator that's plumbed between the turbo and the engine. A water cooled turbo like some found on modern diesel trucks and some cars will have an electric pump to continue cooling the turbo after shutdown. I don't know of any tractors that use this technology...yet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKR View Post
    I agree but if it has a intercooler. The water cooler will run after the tractor is turn off. This will cool the turbo down. Then the temp sender will turn off the intercooler.
    That's how it works on cars.

    JKR,

    An intercooler is an air to air heat exchanger located in the cold side flow (boost) between the pressure side of the turbo and the intake of the engine. There are 2 uses for an intercooler, in low compression high performance gasoline engines they are primarily for added performance as the heat injected into the intake air by the boosting of the pressure and the contact with turbo components of the intake air is dissipated providing for additional charge density. On heavy duty Diesel engines, intercoolers are primarily for lower emissions and less soot production. As both intercooler types are post turbo, they play no part in shut down heat soak concerns.

    Water cooled turbo housings are very common on automotive and on/off road/stationary Diesel engines. In automotive use, they are most often seen when the turbo is located in an area that has limited space to allow air assisted convection heat dissipation of the housing and not many motorists are going to sit in a running car in the parking lot at the mall waiting for the housing to cool before they shut the car off so in order to keep the turbo alive for the duration of the powertrain warranty, they pump water through it when the car is shut down. In HD/industrial applications, it's used when EGT are determined to be high causing the housing to heat to the point of "coaking" the oil or turning it into an abrasive form of carbon when it contacts the hot bearing and housing.

    Tom
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