Diesel fuel in winter for new 1026R
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Thread: Diesel fuel in winter for new 1026R

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    Diesel fuel in winter for new 1026R

    Just wondering what is best (in this part of eastern Nebraska, typically out moving snow in 15-25 degree temperatures):
    1. Just use #2 diesel
    2. Use #2 with an additive, or perhaps with kerosene or gasoline added?
    3. Use only #1 diesel in winter (I guess it will be available somewhere... )

    In terms of starting the tractor, I had the dealer install a tank heater before I took delivery... so, starting will not be an issue (if the fuel will run).

    Am not used to operating a diesel in the winter... been moving snow with gasoline! Any suggestions on how best to "manage" the diesel fuel for the 1026R will be appreciated!

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    do not use gasoline as an additive..... here in central Indiana an additive called 911 is popular and seems to be decent. We used to use a peoduct called SILOO but can't seem to find it anymore. Best of times with the 1026 I really like the looks of them.
    David

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    Brian's Avatar
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    Welcome to DT Cougar. Power Service 911 is an emergency recovery system disigned to be used when you have water trouble or a gelled situation. It should not be used on a weekly basis and can cause damage to many of the fuel system components if used on a regular basis.

    Mustang, running your diesel in the winter, even in -20 degree days will be no issue. With the new systems of injection and also with good glow plugs, your tractor will start up strong in the cold months. What I would suggest is that you use a GOOD additive in your fuel to help keep it fresh and not collecting water. Water will form ice and that can clog filters or plug fuel lines. Just because an additive is avaialble everywhere does not mean its a good one. Power Service is a great example as it is everywhere but it does next to nothing to your fuel.

    There are two types of additives. Emmulsifiers that suspend water and de-emulsifiers that make water drop out of the system. I like to use an emmulsifier as it works best in our tractors as there are too many places to catch and store water perminantly. You can read more here (post 8 gets to the real info) : http://www.greentractortalk.com/foru...ight=soyshield

    Once you add a good additive, don't worry about your fuel. When you start your tractor, activate your glow plugs and once it starts, allow it to warm up for a few minutes. Diesel oil is much thicker than a normal gasoline oil. They say a typical gasilione engine has oil throughout the engine in 20 seconds and a typical diesel engine will take up to 60 seconds to have oil everywhere. (exact times vary on the engines, but its a good example) After that, enjoy it.



    Brian

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    I second that on the Power Service 911, it is dangerous stuff it will make your engine run very hot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    Welcome to DT Cougar. Power Service 911 is an emergency recovery system disigned to be used when you have water trouble or a gelled situation. It should not be used on a weekly basis and can cause damage to many of the fuel system components if used on a regular basis.

    Mustang, running your diesel in the winter, even in -20 degree days will be no issue. With the new systems of injection and also with good glow plugs, your tractor will start up strong in the cold months. What I would suggest is that you use a GOOD additive in your fuel to help keep it fresh and not collecting water. Water will form ice and that can clog filters or plug fuel lines. Just because an additive is avaialble everywhere does not mean its a good one. Power Service is a great example as it is everywhere but it does next to nothing to your fuel.

    There are two types of additives. Emmulsifiers that suspend water and de-emulsifiers that make water drop out of the system. I like to use an emmulsifier as it works best in our tractors as there are too many places to catch and store water perminantly. You can read more here (post 8 gets to the real info) : http://www.greentractortalk.com/foru...ight=soyshield

    Once you add a good additive, don't worry about your fuel. When you start your tractor, activate your glow plugs and once it starts, allow it to warm up for a few minutes. Diesel oil is much thicker than a normal gasoline oil. They say a typical gasilione engine has oil throughout the engine in 20 seconds and a typical diesel engine will take up to 60 seconds to have oil everywhere. (exact times vary on the engines, but its a good example) After that, enjoy it.
    Thanks for that info, was told by a modern mechanic to use it. Have mainly used it in my Ford trucks with the T444E.
    Thanks again

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    Well, I'm a little confused. This is all about the Emmulsifiers and D-Emmulsifiers. My 4520 has fuel injection, and I know there is pressure on the fuel line into the injectors. So I though that my Opti-Lube pulling water out was good. I know Brian has a 4x20, but he likes his treatment that leaves the water suspended in the fuel. I still need to look in my service manuals and parts list and see how much room there is in the tank for the water to get trapped. Now that winter is coming, it's time.

    I'm guessing that the description "High Pressure" when applied to fuel injected engines has some PSI level much higher than the 4x20s?

    And Brian, where do you get the "leave the water in" emmulsifier you like to use?

    And thanks for the info on how long it takes for the oili to circulate in a diesel. Never knew that, learned something today, what a great day .

    Pete
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
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    Pete,
    I do not know the exact specs of the PSI in our 4x20's. I have to assume that they might see 3,000 psi under sever load, but that is a guess. Since we are not running a common rail system like the new trucks, I know we are not coming to anywhere near the 30 to 40,000 psi that they can get to.

    Water, when put under pressure, can bust into steam and really mess up injectors. That is why you will see people who run race trucks or pulling trucks do everything they can to get water out of the diesel.

    With that said, an emulsifier does not break up water and suspend it in bubbles of water. It breaks it up into the molecular level and distributes it throughout the fuel. The reason I like that is because I never have a slug of water sitting at the bottom of a tank or in a line that has a dip. It reduces the chances of me having a fuel bowl full of water and a no run situation. It also keeps the fuel tanks cleaner.

    But, will any of us ever see that much water? I doubt it, but many of our tractors are not used 100's of hours a year.

    Here is a great example. Behind our farm barn we have a 600 gallon tank of diesel fuel. My uncle was going to treat the fuel for me and could not find my treatment, so he went down and bought power service in the grey bottle. Dumped in 5 gallons of it or so. He told me and I told him to fill up his truck before we filled up the tractor. He looked at me funny and said sure! After sitting treated and still for 4 days, all the water and sludge settled tot he bottom. When he pumped it into his truck, the first few gallons were crap fuel and water. This tank never gets cleaned and will sit half full over the winter sometimes. Needless to say, 3 filters later he had all the water and sludge out of his truck. 1,000 miles later he replaced the fuel pump on the block.

    That is an extreme case, but by suspending the water in the fuel, we get it out of the system without any issues to our fuel system. I would rather know that my tanks do not have water sitting in them.

    I get my fuel treatment from a big rig service station that I work by. I also order from a schaeffer's rep for the soy shield I use.

    I will say that 90 percent of the people who go to the local supermarket and buy a fuel treatment wasted their money and would have done just fine or better without using it.

    Does that help?



    Brian

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    kjung17's Avatar
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    Most mechanical injectors that I have dealt with operate at 3500-4000 psi.

    sent from my cell via tapatalk
    Thanks,
    Kevin

    Master Service Technician, John Deere AG, North America
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    Brian, Kevin all good data. I'll look to see what my "nooks and crannies" are for water. When I'm doing the annual servicing this fall, I'll see if anything is in the fuel filter bowl. I checked it a while back and it was all Diesel, but I can see where if it hid in the tank it could send a "gulp" of water into things.

    I'll see if I can get the "soy sauce" over the net.

    My primary reason for an additive is lubrication, everything else is not too important.

    It also seems that fuel and equipment stored indoor, even in an unheated but insulated space, has an advantage when it comes to what happens to the fuel.

    tnx for the data!

    Pete
    '09 JD4520 Cab (60HP), '97 KubotaB21 TLB (21HP), 400cx loader, MX6 rotary mower, SB1106 6' Sickle Bar, BB3272 6' box blade, GradeMaster 7' Landplane, Frontier AF11E Front Blade, 4' Pallet Forks, 6' landscape rake, ballast box, Woods GTC 40" tiller, PHD 9" auger, 4' x 8' chain harrow, '16 X755 (23HP Diesel) w/front PTO, 60" deck, 72" front blade, '90 JD318 (18HP gas) with 48" MM mower, 54" front blade, 47" snowblower.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    Welcome to DT Cougar. Power Service 911 is an emergency recovery system disigned to be used when you have water trouble or a gelled situation. It should not be used on a weekly basis and can cause damage to many of the fuel system components if used on a regular basis.

    Mustang, running your diesel in the winter, even in -20 degree days will be no issue. With the new systems of injection and also with good glow plugs, your tractor will start up strong in the cold months. What I would suggest is that you use a GOOD additive in your fuel to help keep it fresh and not collecting water. Water will form ice and that can clog filters or plug fuel lines. Just because an additive is avaialble everywhere does not mean its a good one. Power Service is a great example as it is everywhere but it does next to nothing to your fuel.

    There are two types of additives. Emmulsifiers that suspend water and de-emulsifiers that make water drop out of the system. I like to use an emmulsifier as it works best in our tractors as there are too many places to catch and store water perminantly. You can read more here (post 8 gets to the real info) : http://www.greentractortalk.com/foru...ight=soyshield

    Once you add a good additive, don't worry about your fuel. When you start your tractor, activate your glow plugs and once it starts, allow it to warm up for a few minutes. Diesel oil is much thicker than a normal gasoline oil. They say a typical gasilione engine has oil throughout the engine in 20 seconds and a typical diesel engine will take up to 60 seconds to have oil everywhere. (exact times vary on the engines, but its a good example) After that, enjoy it.
    Hmm.... had just picked up some Power Service at the local NAPA store... they pushed it "as the best"... "need to use it"... "not enough additives by the fuel suppliers" .... guess have to go back to square one. Thanks for the help in pointing toward it...

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