Hobart 140-Lincoln 140-Klutch140
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    Hobart 140-Lincoln 140-Klutch140

    I've been looking at Hobart, Lincoln & Northern Tool's Klutch 140 welders. There appears to be very little difference between the capabilities of the Hobart & Lincoln, but I'm not sure how the Klutch brand would stack up. Anyone have user experience with these three welders. I'm thinking of getting one just to fool around with & maybe make some light duty items out of mild steel. Frankly I don't have a specific need other than to maybe waste some money & time in my workshop. Maybe repair some mower deck shells or other items of that nature.

    The Klutch brand is the lowest in buy in cost. Hobart & Lincoln is a toss up within a few bucks of each other. But the Klutch can save some real money if you catch the Northern tool sale when they have it.
    Last edited by Maddog; 08-03-2017 at 01:41 PM.

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    Drifterbike's Avatar
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    I am also in same boat.
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    sennister's Avatar
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    Not exactly the same but I have a Hobart 190 and am happy with it. I changed the regulator over to a flow meter and run it on 100% CO2. It produces more spatter but better penetration. The biggest advantage though is I am a homebrewer and already had CO2 tanks for my keggerators. So I didn't need to get another tank to maintain.

    Most will come with flux core wire. This is fine for getting started but MIG (GMAW) welding either on 100% CO2 or an Argon/CO2 mix is nice as there is little to no clean up. You can run a bead and go right back over it.

    As for supplies, I got most of my stuff at USA Weld. You will want to get a few extra tips, wire, nozzle gel, MIG Pliers as well as safety gear. I am running 0.030 wire as it is pretty flexible. More so if you are leaning more toward heavier material than thin sheet metal. If you think you will do more sheet metal than thicker stuff then go with a thinner wire like a 0.024.

    For practice I would recommend picking up a fence T post. The angle makes a great place to practice running beads. It will take practice to figure out feed rate, how quick to move and getting a feel for it. Though thickness of the material and wire spec also impacts this.

    My Dad has a smaller Lincoln welder. He is happy with it but it uses different tips. Where we shop locally they sell Hobart so those supplies are easier to find. He gave me a bunch of tips because he though they would fit his Lincoln but they don't. So I think that should be a factor. What brands and supplies are locally available should you be mid project and need something. Is that a big deal if it is just screwing around and having to wait a few days to get something shipped in isn't a big deal? Other than that for light duty work, any of them are about the same. I don't think any of them are leaps and bounds better than the next. I guess if all else was equal, the one with the most variability would be better. For instance do they use infinity adjustments or hard settings for voltage and/or wire feed rate? What they can handle for material is likely going to be the same with all of them. I would guess 1/4" max.


    Here is a thread where I was talking to some people about running 100% CO2. Options to mix at home and such. Also my first bead with the welder.

    http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php...21#post8344621
    Last edited by sennister; 08-03-2017 at 02:58 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sennister View Post
    Not exactly the same but I have a Hobart 190 and am happy with it. I changed the regulator over to a flow meter and run it on 100% CO2. It produces more spatter but better penetration. The biggest advantage though is I am a homebrewer and already had CO2 tanks for my keggerators. So I didn't need to get another tank to maintain.

    Most will come with flux core wire. This is fine for getting started but MIG (GMAW) welding either on 100% CO2 or an Argon/CO2 mix is nice as there is little to no clean up. You can run a bead and go right back over it.

    As for supplies, I got most of my stuff at USA Weld. You will want to get a few extra tips, wire, nozzle gel, MIG Pliers as well as safety gear. I am running 0.030 wire as it is pretty flexible. More so if you are leaning more toward heavier material than thin sheet metal. If you think you will do more sheet metal than thicker stuff then go with a thinner wire like a 0.024.

    For practice I would recommend picking up a fence T post. The angle makes a great place to practice running beads. It will take practice to figure out feed rate, how quick to move and getting a feel for it. Though thickness of the material and wire spec also impacts this.

    My Dad has a smaller Lincoln welder. He is happy with it but it uses different tips. Where we shop locally they sell Hobart so those supplies are easier to find. He gave me a bunch of tips because he though they would fit his Lincoln but they don't. So I think that should be a factor. What brands and supplies are locally available should you be mid project and need something. Is that a big deal if it is just screwing around and having to wait a few days to get something shipped in isn't a big deal? Other than that for light duty work, any of them are about the same. I don't think any of them are leaps and bounds better than the next. I guess if all else was equal, the one with the most variability would be better. For instance do they use infinity adjustments or hard settings for voltage and/or wire feed rate? What they can handle for material is likely going to be the same with all of them. I would guess 1/4" max.


    Here is a thread where I was talking to some people about running 100% CO2. Options to mix at home and such. Also my first bead with the welder.

    Hobart Handler 190 on 100% CO2 - Page 2
    I really don't see myself going past a 140 system. It appears to be a good match for someone like me that has no experience or specific use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maddog View Post
    I really don't see myself going past a 140 system. It appears to be a good match for someone like me that has no experience or specific use.
    I really looked at the 140 pretty hard. The huge plus for it is that it will run on 115v where I need 230v. I have that in the shop so it wasn't a big deal. There is the flexibility to take the 140 anywhere.

    Ultimately I went 190 for a couple reasons. I can get the optional spool gun. I might want to do aluminum or stainless work and the 190 gave me that flexibility that the 140 didn't have. The 190 will also weld up to 5/16" steel where the 140 is 1/4". Do I need to weld 5/16"? Haven't yet but I can if needed. A lesser issue but it is also a 30% duty cycle rather than the 20% on the 140.

    The 140 size is a nice size and nothing wrong with it. I happened to catch a good sale and got the 190 for just under $100 more than what I was planning on spending on a 140. Since I had the power available in my shop I went up a step. It also means I am less likely to have to go back to the arc stick welding which I don't enjoy as much as wire feed.

    Now a nice machine is the Hobart 210 MVP. It does a little ticker material but the cool thing is that it can run on 115v or 230v power. If you are doing normal small stuff or need to weld remote you can plug into 115v. If you need to do the heavier stuff plug into 230v. I just couldn't justify the increase in price. They didn't have it on sale when I bought the 190.

    One thing to keep in mind with MIG Welding if you go with a smaller unit. This isn't an issue because it is small but simply because it is more portable. If you are welding and it is windy out, you can have your gas blow away. Since I am limited to where I have 230v that means I am inside so not as big of a deal. But if you absolutely have to weld something outside and it is windy, you might want to consider skipping gas and going over to Flux Core wire. Like with arc welding it produces its own shielding gas that is less likely to be effected by the wind. That is the great thing though. These welders do both. I can't speak to the others but when going back and forth you have to remember to change the electrode polarity. It is different for FC vs MIG. On the Hobard you have to open the door where the wire reel is and move a wire. I think it is a 10mm nut. Also with FC Welding you have the slag to deal with. But not a huge problem. I would rather have that and a good weld than fight the gas getting blown away and having a poor weld.

    For the home user, I think any of them are fine. Like I said if it were me, I would go with what you can get supplies for locally. We have a farm supply store that has Hobart (where I bought it) and supplies are plentiful if I need something on short notice. While I could wait for an order to come in, why bother. If you go down the gas path, you will also need to find a welding supply store that has gas. Also watch out for the tank rental places. I want to say one tractor supply place has a program where you have to buy in for $100-200 then you still have filling fees. I found another place that just does tank swaps. I keep several tanks of 100% CO2 for my beer and MIG Welding as well as Oxygen and Acetylene for my torch set on hand at all times. I own all my tanks.
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    I should add that I don't weld a lot as I just don't have the time.

    Of the welding I have done, I don't think I have had anything that a 140 couldn't have done. I might have been at max settings doing some welding on my FEL but it would have done it. It mainly came down to catching it on a sale unexpectedly. If not for that I would most likely have gone with the Hobart 140.

    There are some great youtube channels out there if you want to do some research and learn techniques here are a few channels that I used when getting started. Look around the channels and you will find some beginner stuff.

    ChuckE2009

    Welding Tips and Tricks

    Weld (dot) com
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    Will Northern tool fix a klutch welder that has a problem?

    I know in my case anyways that Minneapolis Oxygen which has a store in Duluth is a Miller service center and will honor the Hobart warranty for a machine bought at Mills Fleet farm.

    Not sure but I'd bet they would do the same with a big box Lincoln welder. I like my Hobart 21 MVP, on 110 it is very likely just the 140, but on 220 it is good for much heavier welding.

    The Klutch may work great till it doesn't, then you maybe boxing it up and sending it out on your dime for repairs.

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    Hobart or Lincoln:

    I have used both of these welders in fact I still own both. I prefer the Hobart and mostly use flux core. I do have gas setup on the Lincoln mainly to do body work on old cars and lawn mower decks etc which is very thin metal. I have built trailers, garden plows and about anything else I have a hanker to do and so far had no problem with either machine. I just got a good buy on the Lincoln from a fellow that decided he just did not have the nack to weld thin sheet metal. Using the smaller welders just takes a little longer and on thick metal joints needs to be beveled and sometimes multi passes. Last year I put up some 600 ft of fence using old drill stem across the property using a generator to run my welder. So it can be done just don't get in a big hurry and things will work out find. BUT if you plan on doing serious welding go for the bigger 220 volt machine. The recovery time on those are much less than the smaller machines. Welding for long periods of constant welding smaller machines will over heat and needs time to recycle. I try not weld over 5 to 10 mins or so at a time. So far only had to reset the machine once or twice.

    Just my two bits worth.
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    Another thing about Klutch, for now it is the house brand for Northern Tools. What about next year, what if they decide to sell a welder from a different Chinese company. Maybe your drive roller for the wire feed fails and there is nothing to replace it with.

    Also I have read that the Klutch keeps flowing gas for much longer than most others after the trigger is released, really goes through the gas.
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    Eastwood welders

    Check them out.Great customer and product support, good value with their products, sale pricing and 1st time buyer incentives.

    I'm not associated with them, but I did my research and have had great success with their MIG 165 welder and their plasma cutter.
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