What $367 looks like...
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Thread: What $367 looks like...

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    firemachine69's Avatar
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    What $367 looks like...

    Got tired of the jobber drill bits that were softer than the steel I was drilling, so picked up a "real" set of drill bits, and a carbide burr to go along with them.



    Price is in CAD. Figure about $270USD.
    JD 2520 MCUT (SOLD)

    Looking for a 3xx or 4xx restoration project (at a good price)

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    Fozsey's Avatar
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    I just got done rebuilding a 16' tandom axle flatbed that someone used expanded metal for the decking, I cut the expanded metal off with a torch and replaced it with 2x6 green secured with carriage bolts. The stringers were 2x3x3/16 angle and I've never seen anything drill as hard as this stuff. We were literally chipping the cutting edge off the drill bits we were using and they weren't cheap bits. It almost reminded me of stainless or case hardened steel. I have a set of colbalt bits specifically for frame rails of trucks and those worked better but they also chipped. My father said he's never seen anything like it in almost 50 years of professional welding and metal fab. What is it about these that makes them worth the price? Just curious


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    Walter makes very good bits.
    We use a brand under their umbrella called Titex. They offer an astounding array of solid carbide and high speed bits with geometry and coatings for about any material.
    We use them for mass production on cnc's and automatic screw machines.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fozsey View Post
    I just got done rebuilding a 16' tandom axle flatbed that someone used expanded metal for the decking, I cut the expanded metal off with a torch and replaced it with 2x6 green secured with carriage bolts. The stringers were 2x3x3/16 angle and I've never seen anything drill as hard as this stuff. We were literally chipping the cutting edge off the drill bits we were using and they weren't cheap bits. It almost reminded me of stainless or case hardened steel. I have a set of colbalt bits specifically for frame rails of trucks and those worked better but they also chipped. My father said he's never seen anything like it in almost 50 years of professional welding and metal fab. What is it about these that makes them worth the price? Just curious
    Methods used to enhance cutting tool performance:

    More precise control of exact alloys and exact alloy percent of content = more expensive drill blanks.
    Multi step heat treating operations, often in vacuum furnaces which may include double tempers and cryogenic processing.
    Sophisticated multi axis grinding equipment utilized to produce much smoother surface finishes and more perfect point geometry.
    PVD coatings specific to material application.

    I would say that for hand held drilling I would only spend so much. Most problems will result from the lack of rigidity and feed rate control and a guy could flake a super expensive drill bit just as quick as a medium priced bit.
    When production drilling at least the material should be consistent and feed, speed and rigidity are under control and more expensive drills can be certainly made to run faster and last longer than medium quality bits.

    On the trailer you were working on you could possibly have been drilling inferior hot rolled material that contained inclusions of oxides or had cooled unevenly when rolled leaving you with harder spots.
    Or possibly you had a deluxe trailer manufacturer that built it with high strength steel. This type of steel contains alloys that boost tensile strength a bit without the need for heat treating.
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    1025R FILB, vintage: 2015
    54D MM mowing deck
    Imatch hitch
    2 inch receiver for three point
    "18" cart
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    Ken's hooks and differential lock pedal
    Artillian 36" forks
    Stihl equipment: Saws; MS261C, MS462C, MS661RCM and Blower; BR600 and Trimmer; FS70R and Hedge Cutter; HL 56K and Pressure Washer; RB400
    Husky log splitter

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    Fozsey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff B View Post
    Methods used to enhance cutting tool performance:

    More precise control of exact alloys and exact alloy percent of content = more expensive drill blanks.
    Multi step heat treating operations, often in vacuum furnaces which may include double tempers and cryogenic processing.
    Sophisticated multi axis grinding equipment utilized to produce much smoother surface finishes and more perfect point geometry.
    PVD coatings specific to material application.

    I would say that for hand held drilling I would only spend so much. Most problems will result from the lack of rigidity and feed rate control and a guy could flake a super expensive drill bit just as quick as a medium priced bit.
    When production drilling at least the material should be consistent and feed, speed and rigidity are under control and more expensive drills can be certainly made to run faster and last longer than medium quality bits.

    On the trailer you were working on you could possibly have been drilling inferior hot rolled material that contained inclusions of oxides or had cooled unevenly when rolled leaving you with harder spots.
    Or possibly you had a deluxe trailer manufacturer that built it with high strength steel. This type of steel contains alloys that boost tensile strength a bit without the need for heat treating.
    Before I looked at this trailer, I would have bet my house on mild cold roll angle. Today, not so much. I thought I was pretty hearsed in trailer fab. I felt pretty stupid drilling that steel. I did notice a couple stringers we had to cut to straighten didn't hold the tack welds my dad put on them. I questioned the tempering at that point because I've seen that before welding alloys due to the steel being brittle but shrugged it off to pop being a little rusty. Thanks for the info.
    Last edited by Fozsey; 09-25-2018 at 09:49 PM.
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    arlen's Avatar
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    I agree it could have been inferior Chinese recycled steel...could have a melted down Subaru at one end, and a Samurai sword at the other And yes, I know that both of those are Japanese products..I used those those examples purely for theatrical effect
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    firemachine69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff B View Post
    Methods used to enhance cutting tool performance:

    More precise control of exact alloys and exact alloy percent of content = more expensive drill blanks.
    Multi step heat treating operations, often in vacuum furnaces which may include double tempers and cryogenic processing.
    Sophisticated multi axis grinding equipment utilized to produce much smoother surface finishes and more perfect point geometry.
    PVD coatings specific to material application.

    I would say that for hand held drilling I would only spend so much. Most problems will result from the lack of rigidity and feed rate control and a guy could flake a super expensive drill bit just as quick as a medium priced bit.
    When production drilling at least the material should be consistent and feed, speed and rigidity are under control and more expensive drills can be certainly made to run faster and last longer than medium quality bits.

    On the trailer you were working on you could possibly have been drilling inferior hot rolled material that contained inclusions of oxides or had cooled unevenly when rolled leaving you with harder spots.
    Or possibly you had a deluxe trailer manufacturer that built it with high strength steel. This type of steel contains alloys that boost tensile strength a bit without the need for heat treating.



    The last bits I was using came only in a bulk kit, and cost about a dime for each.
    Robnik and Herminator like this.
    JD 2520 MCUT (SOLD)

    Looking for a 3xx or 4xx restoration project (at a good price)

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