Brass battery terminal
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Thread: Brass battery terminal

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    Brass battery terminal

    I'm not sure what the experts will say but when I have a battery terminal that's subject to frequent corrosion, I've started using brass terminal ends.
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Everstart...3=1716&veh=sem

    So far, they've proved very resistant to corrosion and are a step up in performance. I won't cut a factory cable to put one of those on unless there's a performance issue but I try to keep a couple in stock for use when needed.

    Does anyone else use these?

    Treefarmer
    John Deere 790, 300 loader w Ken's Bolt on Hooks & Piranha tooth bar, grapple, back blade, box blade, Bush Hog mower, couple of red tractors, hay equipment, various old stuff some red, one orange, some I don't remember

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    Superglidesport's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treefarmer View Post
    I'm not sure what the experts will say but when I have a battery terminal that's subject to frequent corrosion, I've started using brass terminal ends.
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Everstart...3=1716&veh=sem

    So far, they've proved very resistant to corrosion and are a step up in performance. I won't cut a factory cable to put one of those on unless there's a performance issue but I try to keep a couple in stock for use when needed.

    Does anyone else use these?

    Treefarmer
    Brass is structurally more durable than lead and these cable ends are popular with marine applications. That being said the zinc component in brass is susceptible to corrosion. Zinc will leach out over time leaving you with a very porous and weak connection. A lead cable end on a lead battery post eliminates that problem.

    Cable end corrosion is usually the result of "out gassing" which is the release of hydrogen gas. This can happen on a battery where the post seal has failed. The failed seal could also be the result of overcharging where battery temperature and internal pressure are increased. System charging voltage should be checked especially when cable end corrosion is a reoccurring problem. The high end of the regulated range should never go beyond 14.8 VDC and a good range is 13.6-14.5 VDC.

    Here's some additional information: http://mathscinotes.com/2013/02/batt...tgassing-math/
    Just my $0.02 worth.......
    Last edited by Superglidesport; 12-16-2017 at 08:47 AM.
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    good information

    Quote Originally Posted by Superglidesport View Post
    Brass is structurally more durable than lead and these cable ends are popular with marine applications. That being said the zinc component in brass is susceptible to corrosion. Zinc will leach out over time leaving you with a very porous and weak connection. A lead cable end on a lead battery post eliminates that problem.

    Cable end corrosion is usually the result of "out gassing" which is the release of hydrogen gas. This can happen on a battery where the post seal has failed. The failed seal could also be the result of overcharging where battery temperature and internal pressure are increased. System charging voltage should be checked especially when cable end corrosion is a reoccurring problem. The high end of the regulated range should never go beyond 14.8 VDC and a good range is 13.6-14.5 VDC.

    Here's some additional information: Battery Outgassing Math | Math Encounters Blog
    Just my $0.02 worth.......
    Thanks for the information. So far, so good on the zinc leaching out but I've only been using them for a couple of years and only when necessary. The hydrogen gas issue seems to be worse with some battery locations. As I recall, there is always some outgassing, even with correct charging and my guess is some of the locations and battery boxes concentrate the gas more than others.

    You are correct on the marine use. That's where I first saw the brass ends. Salt water is heck on anything electrical. It's a tough environment and it's really, really no fun to be on a boat and hit the starter and hear click.

    I'll be interested to see how the ends work over the long run. If it's a short cable and easily accessed, it's probably better to just replace the cable with a new one and the integral ends. If I have to disassemble a machine to run a cable, well the new terminal end looks pretty good.

    Treefarmer
    John Deere 790, 300 loader w Ken's Bolt on Hooks & Piranha tooth bar, grapple, back blade, box blade, Bush Hog mower, couple of red tractors, hay equipment, various old stuff some red, one orange, some I don't remember

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