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Thread: 1025R motor oil

  1. Top | #21
    Yank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray_PA View Post
    Well I held back from posting on this thread for awhile but I just had to add my two cents!!!

    The real issue is, when an engine is breaking it, what parts are actually breaking in and if there is break in oil in an engine, why is there break in oil in the engine.

    Here goes........When an engine is breaking in, it has nothing to do with piston rings, it has all to do with camshafts and lifters!!!!! Its incorrect to think that piston rings have to "wear in", they do not.

    The reason for break in oil, or break in lube, is to break in the camshaft when the engine is first started, either when new or rebuilt, and the camshaft is broken in in the first 1/2 hour of running the engine, and this 1/2 hour of running is done on the engine dyno.

    Any engine that is put in anything in today's world is broken in before it every gets installed in the tractor, vehicle, equipment, etc.

    So, do you have to run break in oil in any engine, the easy answer is absolutely not!!!! Now, if it makes you feel better, go for it, it isn't going to hurt anything because the only difference between break in oil and standard oil is break in oil has zinc in it which clings to the camshaft lobes and lifters, it does nothing for piston rings.

    The old theory of having to break in piston rings was always an inaccurate statement. Breaking in an engine always had to do with breaking in the camshaft and most times, when assembling a new engine, assembly lube is used on the camshaft lobes and lifters which provides the zinc coating to break in the camshaft, so even when the engine is initially fired, the engine does not need to have break in oil in it.

    As others have said, do not lose any sleep over "what is the best oil" because this question cannot be answered. Use a good quality oil that is recommended for diesel engines of the correct viscosity based on the owners manual and you won't go wrong and change it regularly.
    I agree with several people here. Times have changed. Engine break in is just not that much of a factor anymore. Technology has brought these engines to a degree of accuracy that just doesn’t need it for long hours. I really feel like they are 99 percent broke in by the time they hit the lot. As far as oil, it is much, much better too. Keep your oil clean, use the correct viscosity. Let your tractor warm up for a couple minutes before you get to work. I personally believe this is much more important than oil brand. The engine needs time to get the oil moving around. Same for the tranny and hydro pumps.
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  3. Top | #22
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    Lots of voodoo about motor oils. Most of what we think we know is what our daddy told us, and is pretty much irrelevant with today's modern oils and modern engine manufacturing techniques. I just use the oil that the manufacturer recommends for all of my rolling stock and don't feel the need to try to outsmart them. They're on the hook for the warranty...they have every reason to recommend the oil that will give the best performance and longevity and no doubt have tested many, many oils...synthetics included. Synthetics won't give you any advantage in that regard and won't extend your drain intervals. The one exception might be the added low-temp lubricity.
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  4. Top | #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yank View Post
    I agree with several people here. Times have changed. Engine break in is just not that much of a factor anymore. Technology has brought these engines to a degree of accuracy that just doesn’t need it for long hours. I really feel like they are 99 percent broke in by the time they hit the lot. As far as oil, it is much, much better too. Keep your oil clean, use the correct viscosity. Let your tractor warm up for a couple minutes before you get to work. I personally believe this is much more important than oil brand. The engine needs time to get the oil moving around. Same for the tranny and hydro pumps.
    Every engine installed in a vehicle, tractor, piece of equipment, etc. is broken before it gets installed, in fact, that is pretty much the way it has always been, everyone just thought piston rings, in the past had to break-in. Breaking an engine in has always been about the camshaft and lifters, it has never been about breaking in piston rings or anything else in the engine for that matter.

    Again, the difference between break-in oil and standard oil is, break-in oil have a zinc additive which clings to the camshaft lobes and lifters, it has nothing to do with anything else.

    For those that doubt, a quick internet search will give you tons of articles to read on what break-in oil is and what it is used for.

    I wouldn't put break-in oil in any engine I own simply because I know it is already broken in when I got it.

    Now, if I am rebuilding a motor, and I am the assembly person who is going to be the one to fire it up initially, then I am going to use assembly lube on the camshaft and I may use break-in oil for the first 30 minute run, but after that, the break-in oil is getting drained and I would put standard oil in it then.
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