A question about narrow front rollover?
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: A question about narrow front rollover?

  1. Top | #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Last Online
    12-15-2014 @ 05:35 AM
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    269
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 18 Times in 14 Posts

    A question about narrow front rollover?

    I grew up always hearing about "brother" , a family friend who was killed in a tractor rollover maybe 60 years ago. I have no details at all other than it was a narrow front tractor and they found him deceased in the field. All that bunch was always against owning any narrow front tractor ever since.

    I try to envision how the accident occured. Do you suppose a rear wheel went into a ditch causing it to roll? I wish I knew more about this. Being raised on such a story I always avoided narrow fronts. Some folks say they are every bit as safe, me, IDK.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. Top | #2
    rtgt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:24 PM
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    6,322
    Thanks
    1,767
    Thanked 1,118 Times in 794 Posts
    Really hard to tell not knowing the whole story. What I do know is nothing is safer than the operator makes it. Sometimes stuff happens, but being conscientious about how you do things is the best bet.

    By narrow front, do you mean a tricycle?
    Taking the easy way is what makes rivers and men crooked.

    3039R, H160 FEL, 375A Backhoe, Artillian Grapple & Forks
    Z915E
    XUV560

  4. Top | #3
    spferdil's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:43 PM
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,174
    Thanks
    145
    Thanked 384 Times in 238 Posts
    I would agree with rtgt, would depend on the circumstances. If you mean the tricycle type front-end, when I was growing up that's the only kind of tractors there were in my area, mostly for row-cropping. And I drove a lot of them. I don't remember ever hearing of a roll-over or anyone even getting seriously hurt on a tractor.

    Of course it might also depend some on the type of terrain involved, we were mostly flat land.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. Top | #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:13 AM
    Location
    Texas Panhandle
    Posts
    931
    Thanks
    64
    Thanked 90 Times in 83 Posts
    Are tricycles any more dangerous than a normal tractor that has a pivot front axle ? It seems that in both cases the rear wheels do all of the stabilizing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Levi likes this.
    3046r Cab, H165 w/61" bucket, Frontier 72"BB, MX6, and Woods TCR68" Tiller.

  7. Top | #5
    rgd
    rgd is offline
    rgd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Last Online
    02-18-2019 @ 10:52 AM
    Location
    Flint, Texas
    Posts
    2,160
    Thanks
    317
    Thanked 227 Times in 182 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Milharri View Post
    Are tricycles any more dangerous than a normal tractor that has a pivot front axle ? It seems that in both cases the rear wheels do all of the stabilizing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I wouldnt think so. But...I dont know specifics on most brands and sizes and I'm sure it will vary some. I would think by the time a tractor has rolled over far enough to hit the stops....its too late to stop it from going on over.
    JD 2520 TLB
    JD gt 275

    Always remember that you're unique. Just like everyone else.

  8. Top | #6
    Dingeryote's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Last Online
    12-24-2016 @ 10:23 PM
    Location
    Covert Mich.
    Posts
    770
    Thanks
    50
    Thanked 91 Times in 75 Posts
    Narrow fronts are no more prone to tipping than wides on flat ground.

    Farting around and mowing ditches, and similarly uneven ground on a slope, is where the wide fronts have an advantage.

    Woodchuck dens collapsing, and rutted up muddy fields on hill sides can be rather sporty of old tri-cycle tractors.

  9. Top | #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Last Online
    12-15-2014 @ 05:35 AM
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    269
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 18 Times in 14 Posts
    Tricycle front. Thinking I should not have posted this.

  10. Top | #8
    GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC) farmgirl19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    8,562
    Thanks
    1,503
    Thanked 1,149 Times in 751 Posts
    I think it is a good post. It serves to remind everyone, that rollovers can, and do happen.

    I have a 9141 Avery, that my granddad and my dad put a lot of hours on. I put a few. It is tricycle. No mishaps. But there are a lot of variables out there, from location of CG, length of tractor, to terrain. I believe all are safe, if operated according to their limitations, and the operator's limitations.

    That being said, ground can shift and give way, and a person can have a lapse in focus, because they are over confident, since they have "done this so many times before". Accidents will always happen. It is our job to limit those accidents, by using our best judgment.

    Again, nice to have the reminder. Thanks for starting the thread.
    rtgt and Levi like this.
    If man had enough horse sense to treat his wife like a Thoroughbred, she'd never grow into an old nag.

    If you climb in the saddle, be ready for the ride!

    Happiness is contagious; Be a carrier!

  11. Top | #9
    T-Mo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 06:55 AM
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,681
    Thanks
    473
    Thanked 855 Times in 513 Posts
    I have always heard, myself, that tricycle front tractors have more of a tendency to tip over. Rather or not that is true, I don't know. One thing I do know, the tractor can flip over backwards if given the right circumstances. My old boss from years ago related a few experiences he had and heard about of this occurrence. I also was a first hand (sort of) witness of this.

    One day while driving into town, I saw a JD two cylinder tractor, I believe it was an "A", on it's top near a pond. The tractor was a tricycle front tractor and the pond was man made, so there was a slope up to the pond. I drove on thinking it must have happen a day or two ago. It turns out, it just happened and the guy was still pinned underneath the tractor. After hearing this, I felt bad as I SHOULD HAVE STOPPED and see if any assistance was needed.

    Anyways, the fact that a tractor can roll over backwards can happen if put in the wrong type of terrain without taking the necessary precautions. Can they tip over due to the tricycle front? I'm sure it can happen, but any tractor or vehicle can tip over if put in the wrong situation.
    Levi likes this.
    Without ice cream, there will be darkness and chaos!
    Olympian Don Kardong

    1965 110s, 1966 110, 1967 112, 2001 LT150, 2003 GT245, 2004 GX345, 2006 X320

  12. Top | #10
    Senior GTT Super Slacker Gizmo2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 09:41 AM
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    34,132
    Thanks
    5,763
    Thanked 3,940 Times in 2,904 Posts
    Good thread. I always assumed the narrow (tricycle) front tractors had wider or adjustable rear tire spacing for added stabilization.
    Keith

    JD 2320, 200CX FEL/61" bucket , 46 BH/16" bucket, Artillian Forks, 72" Snow Blade, Landscape Rake, Ballast Box, PHD, The Wife
    BX42 Chipper, XUV 560 Gator, Z915B ZTrak

  13. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •