Inclinometers
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    robpm's Avatar
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    Inclinometers

    You can find the industrial rated devices here Products and the non-industrial or recreational rated devices here Products

    How many of you use these devices on your tractors? I know they have been mentioned before and I believe I have seen some on peoples tractors in pictures. I would guess that you should have two of them for both directions.

    If you have one do you use the recreational or the industrial devices?

    Do you use two of them or just one of them?

    What is a good rule of thumb with regards to what degree is safest and where do you approach roll over? I am assuming that has a lot to do with the particular tractor, what kind of width you have on your rims and where the center of gravity is on that particular tractor. Do the manufacturers publish anything for each tractor? Of course maybe there is a rule of thumb that one could go by if one were to use an inclinometer.
    Rob

    second owner of '05' John Deere 990 CUT with the following:
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    Captain Hook Kennyd's Avatar
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    I have one, only because it was given to me by R&B to review-it was their first lighted model. Some pics here: https://plus.google.com/photos/11396...033?banner=pwa


    Would I buy one? No. I never look at it, when I am on a slop or angle I am more concerned about my surrounding than the meter reading. There are no published specs anyway, so you still must rely on the seat-of-your-pants feeling anyway.

    Make me an offer if you want it...
    Kenny

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    Hudsoner's Avatar
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    I have the Off Highway version on my tractor and in my Jeep. From offroading with the Jeep I know what a poor gauge the seat of my pants is. Today I was cleaning the snow that we got last night (almost 10 inches), and I was driving over some snow piles and my pants indicated "Danger". I looked at the gauge and realized I was only at 15º, and that with the rear tires only!

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    robpm's Avatar
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    Hudsoner, Do you really use it? I realize you looked at it with your jeep in the snow. If so how do you know at what * you are close to tipping over?

    That is my whole question, it would be great if you knew at what * your tractor would tip over but I got the feeling that without that info it is just something to look at although Kenny says he does not even look at it or think to look at it.

    It seems to me that the only way to figure out at what * your tractor will tip over is to test it for your tractor and its present setup but I don't know who would want to do that. I am under the impression that it is just something to have and look at and comment on. The best thing I can see in having 2 of them is to determine if your tractor is level or not when checking fluids etc or getting ready to change fluids. If you have it set up parallel with your tractor in the long dimension you could look at the incline or decline which you are on. Maybe some others will pipe up and add their 2 cents worth at some point.

    Thanks for the input.
    Rob

    second owner of '05' John Deere 990 CUT with the following:
    JD 300CX FEL
    JD 8B BH
    JD PF
    Artillian PF with 2" reciever hitch adapter
    JD BB
    SpeeCo 3PH Wood Splitter
    Also an independent SplitFire Wood splitter

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    Hudsoner's Avatar
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    @robpm
    I do not know what the tipping angle wood be, but I remember that I read that it is generally about 35º (my Jeep is close to 45º). As I wrote, I had a tipsy feeling at a little over 15º. Looking at the gauge ensured me that I was still far away from really tipping, and I relaxed for the rest of the work.

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    Keeper of the GTT Cookies dieselshadow's Avatar
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    There is no set tip over angle. Too many variables like operator weight, fuel level, implement weight and location, what you're doing with said implement, loaded tires, tire type, and including tire pressure. I personally wouldn't rely on a imaginary "red line" on a gauge. Just for fun and info, maybe. For certain implements and jobs, sure. But never as a dead on reliable safety indicator.


    Just my .00000002 cents.
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    mjncad's Avatar
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    I have the R & B MODEL# 25CDA Boom Angle Indicators | Tilt Meter | The R&B Manufacturing, Inc. dual axis inclinometer. The side to side works great; but the fore & aft is as worthless as tits on a log as it isn't fluid dampened and vibrates too much to be useful. I modified mine to be fluid dampened with glycerin, and although better, it's still not worth a crap. If you want a dual axis model, get two single axis units and mount them so they measure both directions.

    Do I rely solely on the inclinometer? No, it is a tool to help you judge whether or not you're getting too close to the tipping point. But the ultimate inclinometer is that 3-pounds of gray gelatinous goo between your ears.

    As others have said, there are way too many variables to make a blanket statement as to what's safe and what isn't. R & B probably chose the yellow and red zones arbitrarily based on the designer's pucker factor.
    I have more ideas than ambition.


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    robpm's Avatar
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    It is clear to me that these are a nice thing to have and it is nice to be able to see the angle or degrees but at the end of the day with all the variables it comes ultimately down to what you think or feel may be time to change the situation before you ultimately go over. So for the time being I think that I will save my money. Kenny sorry but I am not going to make you an offer
    Rob

    second owner of '05' John Deere 990 CUT with the following:
    JD 300CX FEL
    JD 8B BH
    JD PF
    Artillian PF with 2" reciever hitch adapter
    JD BB
    SpeeCo 3PH Wood Splitter
    Also an independent SplitFire Wood splitter

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    Bluenose Tim's Avatar
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    A couple of years ago I was mowing along my provincial road with a Craftsman garden tractor on the flat shoulder when the right front wheel left the shoulder and over she went into a ditch. There was no slope, just a drop off that couldn't be seen as the grass had grown up and disguised it. I didn't have time to stop or reverse the tractor, just enough time to disengage the mower as I was going over. The drop off was about six feet deep and the tractor landed upside down and banged my leg on the way over. I have a goose egg on my thigh to this day to remind me. There was no seatbelt on the garden tractor.

    I have an inclinometer mounted on my 2720 to indicate side to side angle. When mowing with my 62D MMM and tires unloaded but set to the wide position, things start feeling unstable at 15 deg. and very dicey between 20 and 25 deg. Having the gage there reminds me to insure that I have my seatbelt fastened and to slow down when I'm between 20 and 25 deg. I'm guessing that at 35 deg. the tractor would be very close to tipping. I've thought about what action to take with the 2720 should it ever start to roll. I've decided to shut off the engine and PTO and just ride it out. I know from experience that I won't have time for anything else like trying to jump clear. My best advice is to think ahead and avoid situations that feel scary. Be safe out there. I've attached a picture showing the inclinometer.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Keeper of the GTT Cookies dieselshadow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluenose Tim View Post
    A couple of years ago I was mowing along my provincial road with a Craftsman garden tractor on the flat shoulder when the right front wheel left the shoulder and over she went into a ditch. There was no slope, just a drop off that couldn't be seen as the grass had grown up and disguised it. I didn't have time to stop or reverse the tractor, just enough time to disengage the mower as I was going over. The drop off was about six feet deep and the tractor landed upside down and banged my leg on the way over. I have a goose egg on my thigh to this day to remind me. There was no seatbelt on the garden tractor.

    I have an inclinometer mounted on my 2720 to indicate side to side angle. When mowing with my 62D MMM and tires unloaded but set to the wide position, things start feeling unstable at 15 deg. and very dicey between 20 and 25 deg. Having the gage there reminds me to insure that I have my seatbelt fastened and to slow down when I'm between 20 and 25 deg. I'm guessing that at 35 deg. the tractor would be very close to tipping. I've thought about what action to take with the 2720 should it ever start to roll. I've decided to shut off the engine and PTO and just ride it out. I know from experience that I won't have time for anything else like trying to jump clear. My best advice is to think ahead and avoid situations that feel scary. Be safe out there. I've attached a picture showing the inclinometer.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0804_M.jpg 
Views:	63 
Size:	996.9 KB 
ID:	28901
    Here's a bit of advice, use the ROPS. The ROPS is only effective IF you use your seatbelt. For those who don't choose to use the ROPS, don't wear the seatbelt. With the ROPS folded and the belt on, the tractor could easily crush the operator when it rolls. Leaving the seatbelt off/ROPS folded will maybe allow you to escape death with only broken bones and major injuries as only the extremely lucky could roll a tractor without using this safety equipment and not get hurt.


    All all else beyond this is completely repairable.
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    2720 w/ 200CX FEL
    , Ken's weld-on hooks, Fit Rite Hydraulics Top and Tilt kit, Artillian forks.
    1954 60 - getting full restoration, 1964
    110 round fender in the shop for crustoration
    Ferris IS3200Zzero turn mower

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to dieselshadow For This Useful Post:

    DRobinson (06-03-2014)

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