Looking at the possibility of getting a trailer to haul my 990
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
Like Tree11Likes

Thread: Looking at the possibility of getting a trailer to haul my 990

  1. Top | #1
    robpm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    09-11-2019 @ 01:31 PM
    Location
    Bloomingdale, NJ which is in the north east part of NJ
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 163 Times in 114 Posts

    Looking at the possibility of getting a trailer to haul my 990

    I am green to trailers and what would be required to haul my 990. Total weight of the 990 is around 5000 lbs with the BH and FEL on. It is just under 20' long from the end of the BH to the end of the heavy duty bucket with the bucket down. So I am guessing that I need a 20" trailer. I like the ramps that drop down and you drive on them to put the tractor onto the trailer. Obviously I have to have something to tow it with too but I guess I should determine the weight that the truck would need to be able to tow as I look at that aspect of things. How much would a trailer weigh that would be able to haul my 990? Also I am guessing a dual axle is better than a single when it comes to this type of length but again I don't know. I have read some of these posts on braks and state laws etc. I live in NJ, one of the most expensive states in the country to live in especially tax wise so I am guessing its laws for trailers could possibly be pretty bad or over constrictive. Of course you never know.

    What would something like this cost

    Again I am just considering it. I may find that after I look at all the ramifications that it will not be worth it but I do want to investigate it.

    Thanks for the input and help.
    Rob

    second owner of '05' John Deere 990 CUT with the following:
    JD 300CX FEL
    JD 8B BH
    JD PF
    Artillian PF with 2" reciever hitch adapter
    JD BB
    SpeeCo 3PH Wood Splitter
    Also an independent SplitFire Wood splitter

  2. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. Top | #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:55 PM
    Location
    Berlin, MA
    Posts
    4,676
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 880 Times in 674 Posts
    I have no idea what the legal/tax situation in in NJ so I'm not going to even try to address that.

    Trailers all have a "GWVR" - Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. That is the total amount of weight that the trailer can legally hold. So you need to look at trailers where the GVWR is more than the combined weight of your tractor + implements + the weight of the trailer itself.

    The more common axles on these things are rated at 3500 or 5000 lbs (each). So you aren't going to find many single axle trailers that will work for you. But there are a LOT of dual axle trailers with a GVWR of 9,900 or 10,000 lbs. Those are probably in your target range.

    In most States you'll get a ticket of your equipment is hanging off of the trailer while on a public road so yeah, a 20' is probably what you'd want - at least (Maybe a 24'!).

    Since you are just starting to look, go on Craigslist and do a search on "Trailer" in the Heavy Equipment listings. That'll give you a good idea what you'd be looking at as well as prices in your area on used trailers. For something like that in my area new, it'd be in the $6000-$6500 area.
    D160 Mower/Bagger.
    2014 2032R tractor/H130 FEL w/Bolt-On Hooks/54" Snow Plow/iMatch Quick-Hitch/County Line 5' Scraper blade/County Line Carry-All/Artillian 42" Forks & QH Adapter/JD Ballast Box/Frontier SB1164 3PH Blower/Leinbach PHD/Wallenstien BX42 Chipper

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to JimR For This Useful Post:

    robpm (04-24-2015)

  5. Top | #3
    ddinham's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:58 PM
    Location
    Eastern Kansas
    Posts
    3,613
    Thanks
    167
    Thanked 500 Times in 383 Posts
    You definitely want a tandem axle trailer with a minimum GVW of 7,000lbs. I just put my 20ft aluminum trailer up for sale that has a 7k rating, but only weighs 1500lbs, leaving 5500lbs available plus the tongue weight, netting about 6000lbs net available. When you calculate net available weight rating, you have to allow for the tare weight of the trailer (empty weight). In your situation, you could be marginal for a steel trailer, especially a well built trailer that could be a little heavier, but an aluminum trailer similar to mine would work well for you. Another thing to consider is the actual floor length. For example, mine is 18ft floor length plus 2ft dovetail. I believe you could get by with a 20ft trailer (18+2) as you could rest the BH on the dovetail, but anything smaller could be an issue. Mine is actually a car hauler trailer with ramps that store on the side under the bed. You could also consider an equipment trailer. These usually have stand-up ramps in the rear and can be had in heavier GVW ratings, however they usually weigh 3000 to 3500lbs. Hope this helps.

    Dave
    JD 4066R CAB
    JD H180 FEL with SSQA brackets, JD iMatch, JD Ballast Box & ext, JD pull behind seed spreader
    Frontier RB2196H 8 ft rear blade/hyd angle, Frontier BB1065 Box Blade, Befco 3pt 110 inch RFM
    48" pallet forks, KK 3pt Boom Pole, Northern Tool 3pt middle buster, 2 bottom Dearborn plow
    County Line post hole digger, Rhino 3pt 10ft brush hog, Land Pride 8ft rock rake
    Fit Rite Hydraulics 3pt Top Link, front 3pt adapter for SSQA, 7 1/2 ft Field Roller, 8ft Dearborn tandem disk

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to ddinham For This Useful Post:

    robpm (04-24-2015)

  7. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

  8. Top | #4
    coaltrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 04:54 PM
    Location
    NW Penna
    Posts
    20,200
    Thanks
    1,094
    Thanked 3,111 Times in 2,273 Posts
    If the length of your tractor is 20' you need a trailer that is longer than that. It is a must to be able to center the weight on the trailer properly.
    ~Stan~
    It is what it is
    Knowledge is power, ignorance is bliss
    2520 w/200CX w/62D2

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to coaltrain For This Useful Post:

    robpm (04-24-2015)

  10. Top | #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Last Online
    09-02-2018 @ 09:17 PM
    Location
    Secor, IL
    Posts
    1,005
    Thanks
    108
    Thanked 175 Times in 131 Posts
    IMO, you need a 3/4 truck, 20' or 22' trailer rated for 10K GVW with brakes on both axles..

    You said the length of the tractor from end to end is 20', but when loaded you can swing the hoe to one side and gain a foot or two..
    Jim Timber likes this.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to NEWT For This Useful Post:

    robpm (04-24-2015)

  12. Top | #6
    robpm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    09-11-2019 @ 01:31 PM
    Location
    Bloomingdale, NJ which is in the north east part of NJ
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 163 Times in 114 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ddinham View Post
    You definitely want a tandem axle trailer with a minimum GVW of 7,000lbs. I just put my 20ft aluminum trailer up for sale that has a 7k rating, but only weighs 1500lbs, leaving 5500lbs available plus the tongue weight, netting about 6000lbs net available. When you calculate net available weight rating, you have to allow for the tare weight of the trailer (empty weight). In your situation, you could be marginal for a steel trailer, especially a well built trailer that could be a little heavier, but an aluminum trailer similar to mine would work well for you. Another thing to consider is the actual floor length. For example, mine is 18ft floor length plus 2ft dovetail. I believe you could get by with a 20ft trailer (18+2) as you could rest the BH on the dovetail, but anything smaller could be an issue. Mine is actually a car hauler trailer with ramps that store on the side under the bed. You could also consider an equipment trailer. These usually have stand-up ramps in the rear and can be had in heavier GVW ratings, however they usually weigh 3000 to 3500lbs. Hope this helps.

    Dave
    Dave, if I lived closer to Kansas I would be interested in seeing your trailer. What brand or make is it? I would maybe be able to find one around my neck of the woods of like kind. I like the weight and all that you have described. Does your trailer have brakes on both axles? If so I am guessing that they are triggered by the braking of the vehicle which is towing it and that they are triggered by a 12V DC current maybe by the truck's brake lights. Again I am pretty green when it comes to this so I appreciate your input.
    Rob

    second owner of '05' John Deere 990 CUT with the following:
    JD 300CX FEL
    JD 8B BH
    JD PF
    Artillian PF with 2" reciever hitch adapter
    JD BB
    SpeeCo 3PH Wood Splitter
    Also an independent SplitFire Wood splitter

  13. Top | #7
    Keeper of the GTT Cookies dieselshadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:16 PM
    Location
    Joelton TN
    Posts
    19,933
    Thanks
    1,068
    Thanked 4,329 Times in 2,601 Posts
    Electric trailer brakes require the tow vehicle to have a brake controller installed. The brake controller varies the current applied to the brakes. How that is done varies controller to controller. Some are constant, some ramp the current up over time, others are proportional to brake pressure applied by the driver. Installation of a brake controller can be as simple as plugging one in to an already installed connector on the vehicle to a more complicated install that requires tapping into the main hydraulic brake line on the vehicle.
    robpm and Jim Timber like this.
    - Jason

    GreenTractorTalk.com Rules, Policies, and Terms of Use

    Subscribe to dieselshadowman on YouTube

    2720 w/ 200CX FEL
    , Ken's weld-on hooks, Fit Rite Hydraulics Top and Tilt kit, Artillian forks.
    1954 60 - getting full restoration, 1964
    110 round fender in the shop for crustoration
    Ferris IS3200Zzero turn mower

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmo2 View Post
    Dieselshadow is my Hero.


  14. The Following User Says Thank You to dieselshadow For This Useful Post:

    robpm (04-24-2015)

  15. Top | #8
    ejb69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Last Online
    10-08-2019 @ 05:04 AM
    Location
    Green Bay / Pembine Wi
    Posts
    2,274
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 126 Times in 122 Posts
    Most if not all the newer trucks with a towing a package will have a factory installed brake controller.

    Some of the 1/2 tons can tow over 10,000 lbs. A 3/4 ton isn't needed to pull our small tractors. After driving my dads Ford 14 150 / EB, I truly believe it will out pull my 99 Dodge 2500/ 360.
    Eric

    2011 1026R / H120 / 60D auto-connect, independent-lift mmm / 54" snowblower / 4' KK Pro rotary mower / KK 4' tiller

  16. Top | #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:55 PM
    Location
    Berlin, MA
    Posts
    4,676
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 880 Times in 674 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by dieselshadow View Post
    Electric trailer brakes require the tow vehicle to have a brake controller installed. The brake controller varies the current applied to the brakes. How that is done varies controller to controller. Some are constant, some ramp the current up over time, others are proportional to brake pressure applied by the driver. Installation of a brake controller can be as simple as plugging one in to an already installed connector on the vehicle to a more complicated install that requires tapping into the main hydraulic brake line on the vehicle.
    Just to add on to diesel's post above, since you will be looking for a tow vehicle, if you buy new you can order with a tow package and ask to have a brake controller installed by the dealer (some tow packages include the controller, some just provide the wiring for it). Any electric brake controller will work - they're standardized. If you go looking for a used vehicle, look at any trailer wiring it has and make sure there is a 7-pin plug. There are several trailer wiring configurations but the 7-pin is the one that will have the wiring for brakes. A 4-pin, for example, won't.
    dieselshadow and coaltrain like this.
    D160 Mower/Bagger.
    2014 2032R tractor/H130 FEL w/Bolt-On Hooks/54" Snow Plow/iMatch Quick-Hitch/County Line 5' Scraper blade/County Line Carry-All/Artillian 42" Forks & QH Adapter/JD Ballast Box/Frontier SB1164 3PH Blower/Leinbach PHD/Wallenstien BX42 Chipper

  17. Top | #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Last Online
    09-02-2018 @ 09:17 PM
    Location
    Secor, IL
    Posts
    1,005
    Thanks
    108
    Thanked 175 Times in 131 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ejb69 View Post
    A 3/4 ton isn't needed to pull our small tractors. After driving my dads Ford 14 150 / EB, I truly believe it will out pull my 99 Dodge 2500/ 360.
    First off, a 990 isnt a "small tractor"..

    Second, the truck makes a huge difference in towing... Yea, 1/2 tons have tons of power now days, as much as 3/4 ton gassers, but the 3/4 tons have much more suspension, brakes, and heavier frames..

    I have a 03 F250 and used to have a 05 F350, take power and braking out of it, and they were worlds apart in how they handled the same trailer.. The 350 you didnt know the trailer was there.. Also, it was not a dually, ext cab shortbed 4X4 and the 250 is a reg cab 4X2.

    3/4 and 1 tons have 1000-2000 lb curb weight advantage that makes all the difference in the world in how the truck will handle while towing..



  18. The Following User Says Thank You to NEWT For This Useful Post:

    OldmanX (04-26-2015)

  19. Remove Advertisements
    GreenTractorTalk.com
    Advertisements
     

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •