What trailor should I buy??
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    What trailor should I buy??

    What should I buy to tow my new JD 4720. It has a FEL and backhoe and belly mower so Im not sure what it weights but I do have a ram 3500 so not a problem towing. Gooseneck or bumper pull and what weight range..? Or maybe a dump trailor to have when I need one???? I don't know...whatcha think guys?

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    56FordGuy's Avatar
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    Without knowing what the machine weighs, it's hard to say what weight rating you need for the trailer.

    Tractor Data lists the bare 4720 at 3,800 lbs. By the time you add the weight of the backhoe, loader, mower, and any additional ballast (wheel weights, filled tires) you may have I would guess the machine is somewhere in the 7,000-8,000 lb range. That's probably high, but without any solid numbers it's better to err on the side of caution. You have to deduct the weight of the trailer itself from the rated capacity, i.e. a 7,000 lb trailer might weight 1,500 lbs giving you a real world load capacity of about 5,500 lbs.

    What does the tractor measure with everything on it from front to rear? You'll want to make sure the trailer is long enough that you can carry additional attachments you may need, and have room to shift the load forward or back to get it balanced correctly. With the loader, bucket, and hoe on that's going to be a pretty long outfit.

    I think you're looking for a trailer somewhere in the 12,000 lb capacity range and at least 20 feet long. By that point, I would recommend buying a 24-25' long, 14,000 lb deck over gooseneck trailer. They're the 'standard' farm trailer around here, and can be found used regularly. It will also be easier to resell if you ever need to than some smaller trailers. I've had 14K trailers in both gooseneck and bumper pull designs, and in my opinion the gooseneck trailer will handle/ ride much better. With a bumper pull, you will need a weight distributing hitch and may have a difficult time finding a deck over the wheels model. With a gooseneck, no special hitch required and deck over trailers are common. The deck width you lose on an in between the wheels type trailer doesn't seem like a big deal, until you need to turn in a tight area and crunch a fender, or need to load something on from the side.
    -Blake

    Your mileage may vary.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 56FordGuy View Post
    Without knowing what the machine weighs, it's hard to say what weight rating you need for the trailer.

    Tractor Data lists the bare 4720 at 3,800 lbs. By the time you add the weight of the backhoe, loader, mower, and any additional ballast (wheel weights, filled tires) you may have I would guess the machine is somewhere in the 7,000-8,000 lb range. That's probably high, but without any solid numbers it's better to err on the side of caution. You have to deduct the weight of the trailer itself from the rated capacity, i.e. a 7,000 lb trailer might weight 1,500 lbs giving you a real world load capacity of about 5,500 lbs.

    What does the tractor measure with everything on it from front to rear? You'll want to make sure the trailer is long enough that you can carry additional attachments you may need, and have room to shift the load forward or back to get it balanced correctly. With the loader, bucket, and hoe on that's going to be a pretty long outfit.

    I think you're looking for a trailer somewhere in the 12,000 lb capacity range and at least 20 feet long. By that point, I would recommend buying a 24-25' long, 14,000 lb deck over gooseneck trailer. They're the 'standard' farm trailer around here, and can be found used regularly. It will also be easier to resell if you ever need to than some smaller trailers. I've had 14K trailers in both gooseneck and bumper pull designs, and in my opinion the gooseneck trailer will handle/ ride much better. With a bumper pull, you will need a weight distributing hitch and may have a difficult time finding a deck over the wheels model. With a gooseneck, no special hitch required and deck over trailers are common. The deck width you lose on an in between the wheels type trailer doesn't seem like a big deal, until you need to turn in a tight area and crunch a fender, or need to load something on from the side.
    Wow, thanks for all the good info. I just today found a 8x16 wheels under deck trailer made with tandem Mobil home wheels and axels with electric brakes. This trailer is a beast. Made with 3in angle iron,ramps and the whole nine yards. I'm going to look at it this evening. I'll report back on it.

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    ElWood's Avatar
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    I went with a 7x16 dump trailer for my 3320. It works great and the dumping feature comes in very handy. Dump trailers are built very heavy duty. Mine weighs 4,000 empty. Your tractor might be too big for one but I would definitely check them out. I can usually close the rear doors with my loader and something on the 3 point hitch. My brush hog does hang off the back though which is fine. I just leave the doors open.
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    56FordGuy's Avatar
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    A 16' trailer will probably be way too short for your tractor. I would also avoid a tri axle that length, because the axles will be more prone to scrub/ drag the tires sideways in a sharp turn. I'm not a fan of tri axles in general, but certainly not a trailer that short. I'd rather have dual wheels on two axles. Better turning radius, more tire in contact with the road, and fewer bearings to maintain. That said, most trailers don't get into dual wheels or tri axles until you're pushing 20k gross weight.

    I would also stay away from trailers with mobile home axles. The axles are always a sign of a home made trailer, which means construction and engineering may be somewhat suspect. A lot of guys have the knowledge and skill to build a good trailer at home, and a lot of guys don't. You can't always be sure who you're buying from.

    The axles themselves are usually built for one use, which means the bearings and other components are rather low quality. I've seen several that run specific tire sizes and bolt patterns, something like a 14.5" rim.

    I think you would be better off buying a factory built trailer.
    -Blake

    Your mileage may vary.

    JD 6410
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    YouTube- Life in Wyoming

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    Brian's Avatar
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    I have a cabbed 4520 and I purchased a Suretrac 18+4 and I could not be happier. I can also use a 16 foot PJ Low Profile Dump trailer and I can tell you that the 4520 and a loader will not fit.

    http://www.greentractortalk.com/foru...sed-today.html

    The tilt trailer makes loading and unloading very easy, fast and safe. I am working on a video of me loading and unloading the tractor.

    I would give them a look.

    Sure Trac |



    Brian

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    Kaufman Trailers...

    I'm in the excavating business and needed a trailer for my skid steer loader and attachments. Kaufman make a first class trailer built to order trailer (with tilt if you like), sells factory direct and usually about 20 percent cheaper than retail prices.

    check out their website... I'm not affiliated just had great service from my trailer.

    Kaufman Trailers

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    LT_JD's Avatar
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    I have heard that mobile home axles are no longer legal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LT_JD View Post
    I have heard that mobile home axles are no longer legal.
    Well the trailer I looked at this evening is a "no go"... To short for one thing and looked a little rough. I thought it was built a little heavy than necessary which takes away from max tow. Thinkin ill go with a dump trailer or an 18-24 ft dovetail and get some warranty on it. I really really appreciate the feed back guys. I always listen to experience. Thank a bunch!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 56FordGuy View Post
    A 16' trailer will probably be way too short for your tractor. I would also avoid a tri axle that length, because the axles will be more prone to scrub/ drag the tires sideways in a sharp turn. I'm not a fan of tri axles in general, but certainly not a trailer that short. I'd rather have dual wheels on two axles. Better turning radius, more tire in contact with the road, and fewer bearings to maintain. That said, most trailers don't get into dual wheels or tri axles until you're pushing 20k gross weight.

    I would also stay away from trailers with mobile home axles. The axles are always a sign of a home made trailer, which means construction and engineering may be somewhat suspect. A lot of guys have the knowledge and skill to build a good trailer at home, and a lot of guys don't. You can't always be sure who you're buying from.

    The axles themselves are usually built for one use, which means the bearings and other components are rather low quality. I've seen several that run specific tire sizes and bolt patterns, something like a 14.5" rim.

    I think you would be better off buying a factory built trailer.
    You're exactly right on everything...was to short and craftsmanship looked a little below par. Thanks!!

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