A 196? John Deere H3? ???
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Thread: A 196? John Deere H3? ???

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    A 196? John Deere H3? ???

    Here is an ad I ran across on Craigslist awhile ago and it's still up.

    The ad says it's a 196? H3 John Deere tractor. I have never heard of that model and there is nothing on Tractor Data in either L&G or the Agricultural machines about a H3 model. When I look at the photo's the body pan doesn't look like a 1960's vintage model to me because of the shape, but I will be the first to admit I am not around many of the early machines and have never owned one. Yet the front hood has that "rounded edge" look of some of the early models. The steering wheel and column look like those I have seen on the early machines.

    Check out the exhaust stack, and also the grill which now appears to be void of headlights, but they were round in the grill.

    Someone put a lot of time and money into the loader and extra pump, hydraulic tank, etc.

    Just curious is anyone has any idea what this machine is in terms of horsepower, engine, etc. or any details about it. It has a 3 point hitch and other features which I don't recall seeing on many of the earlier L&G tractors. Check out the side frame rails and the loader attachment points of the tractor frame from what can be seen in the pictures.


    The discussion about loaders for older tractor and smaller tractor models comes up fairly often and I thought maybe some might be interested in seeing the loader on this machine. Is this an after market brand of loader which anyone recognizes or was this all custom built for this machine? I have a feeling it was purpose built for this tractor.

    The owner certainly understands the need and use of rear ballast, which is good to see........

    I figure someone will know some details about this machine.........thanks for replies. There are 4 pictures at the Craigslist listing showing more details and each side of the machine, linked below.....

    John Deere H3 - farm garden - by owner - sale



    1025R with Mauser Cab
    (10/2017)/ 120R FEL / RC2048 Mower / All of Ken's Bolt on Products / 60" HD Front Broom / 3 pt 45 Gallon Boom less Sprayer / CA2068 Core Aerator / I-Match / 54" Snow Plow w/ angling Quick Attach / Frontier 3 Pt Sprayer / Pallet Forks / 8 -42# Weights

    John Deere 455 (New in 9/1996) / MC519 Cart /60" MMM /47" Snow Thrower / 7'3" snow plow / Quick Hitch /
    4 -42# Weights / JD#10 Cart

    ExMark Lazer Z w/60" Deck , Billy Goat Blower , Full Stable of Echo Products





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    It's a Model 140H3 garden tractor. AFAIK, there was a 140H1 and a 140H3. Maybe the 140H2 got lost in the engineering dept and never made it to production? The 140H3 is a pretty well sought after machine.

    TractorData.com John Deere 140 tractor information
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimR View Post
    It's a Model 140H3 garden tractor. AFAIK, there was a 140H1 and a 140H3. Maybe the 140H2 got lost in the engineering dept and never made it to production? The 140H3 is a pretty well sought after machine.

    TractorData.com John Deere 140 tractor information
    my uncle has the jd 140 H3--bought new around 1970--his even came with a cigarette lighter in it
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    The John Deere 140 was made from 1968 to 1974, and there where an H1 and a H3 version (single hydraulics and triple hydraulics). It was a ground breaking tractor in the garden tractor field. First year had a 12 hp Kohler engine, while starting in 1969, the hp was up to 14 hp. JD also made a lesser model starting in 1970, a 12 hp 120 with just single hydraulics. The 140 was designed to complete against the IH Cub but on a smaller size scale. Here is the info from WFM.

    For the 1968 model year, Deere took on all comers with the all new model 140. Marketed to commercial users, truck farmers, nurserymen, and estate owners, it had the power and features to take on many tasks formerly relegated to larger equipment. Advertising of the day stated that the 140 could be purchased for roughly the same amount as "5-weeks wages of one good handyman". Based on an all-new design, the 1968 140 incorporated several new design features as standard never before used on a Deere Garden tractor:


    • Twelve horsepower, air cooled, Kohler model K301AS cast iron engine with Bendix style starter
    • Sundstrand hydrostatic transmission, unlimited forward speed to 6 > mph
    • Hydraulic attachment lift, with three spools optional (H3)
    • Quick -Tach style mounting of attachments
    • Electromagnetic PTO clutch for front and center mounted attachments.
    • 1 > gallon fuel tank with gauge
    • High back deeply cushioned seat adjustable for height and reach
    • Live rear power take off, used to operate the #33 tiller.

    Introduced as a 12-horse model featuring the Kohler K310AS powerplant with a Bendix style starter, the 140 benefited from a hydrostatic transmission, allowing a seamless transition from forward to reverse travel, as well as static braking. A single large lever on the right side of the pedestal controlled this. The transmission was directly coupled to the engine via a steel driveshaft. A cone style clutch was provided to disconnect the engine from the transmission to aid in cold weather starting. For the 68 model year, this clutch was actuated by a single pedal on the left side of the tractor, which also applied the brakes. No provision was made to force the hydro lever back into the neutral position.
    The hydrostatic transmission also afforded a new feature formerly only found on large farm tractors; hydraulic lift. The charge pump on the transmission fed a single spool valve on all models. The H3 models used the power beyond output of the single valve to supply pressurized oil to a separate two spool valve. The three levers on the left side of the pedestal were closely spaced to allow them to be "palmed". Pioneer style couplers were utilized on the front of the tractor to control attachments and an optional rear set of outlets powered a Category "0" three point hitch or other rear attachments. Deere advertised the ability to use multiple integral attachments at the same time, something the other manufacturers could not accommodate. The option of a front blade in conjunction with a rear mounted tiller was a popular choice.
    Triple safe starting, a Deere feature from 1964 was incorporated on the 140. The PTO needed to be disengaged, the transmission in the neutral setting and the key be used before the tractor could be started. This feature was advertised by showing children playing and climbing on the tractor. Including sitting on the hood!
    The model 140 H1 weighed approximately 730# with the H3 version tipping the scales at about 770#. The 140 was designed as a garden tractor, and as such, the work tools for it were heavily built. Deere designed options included:

    • Model 41 or 48 mower deck
    • Model 54 front blade with hydraulic lift standard and hydraulic angle optional
    • Model 49 front snow thrower with hydraulic lift
    • Model 33 rear tiller with a 26, 34, or 42 inch width and live PTO
    • Model 80 dump cart
    • Model 5a sprayer
    • Front and rear wheel weights
    • Tire chains, hub caps, cigarette lighter, and headlights
    • A Category "0" three point hitch
    • Tire equipment options
    With a tractor the size of the 140, allied suppliers were quick to adapt it to their equipment. Front end loaders were available, as were groundsaws, post hole diggers, hard and soft sided enclosures, landscape rakes, numerous gardening tools like plows and discs, and other tools and attachments aimed at commercial users. A more comprehensive listing of these can be found in the allied attachments section of the site.
    For 1969, the 140 received a 15% upgrade in power with a move to the 14 horsepower Kohler cast iron K321AS. Also new for the '69 model was individual rear brakes. These allowed sharper turns, as well as the ability to feather a wheel if it was spinning. A change a little more difficult to detect was a switch to a true three spool valve on the H3 models.
    At Serial number 30001, for the 1971 model year a change was made in the type of hydrostatic unit used. This change incorporated a pinion and ring gear design rather than the bull gears used on previous models. The rear axle diameter was also increased. Rear brakes were changed for the disc type used up to this time to a more reliable drum brake system. Individual rear wheel brakes were retained on the H3 models.
    Other changes were made throughout the run from the 1968 through 1974 model years. Additional John Deere attachments were added such as the 54C center mounted grader blade and the 542 front mounted PTO.
    Serial number breaks are as follows:
    Year Serial Number Engine
    1968 1,001 - 10,000 Kohler K301 (12HP)
    1969 10,001 - 22,400 Kohler K321 (14HP)
    1970 22,401 - 30,000 Kohler K321 (14HP)
    1971 30,001 - 38,000 Kohler K321 (14HP)
    1972 38,001 - 46,500 Kohler K321 (14HP)
    1973 46.501 - 56,500 Kohler K321 (14HP)
    1974 56.501 - ? Kohler K321 (14HP)

    Summary by Robb Kruger, Photos from John Deere advertising literature. 01/03/2002

    For the 1968 model year, Deere took on all comers with the all new model 140. Marketed to commercial users, truck farmers, nurserymen, and estate owners, it had the power and features to take on many tasks formerly relegated to larger equipment. Advertising of the day stated that the 140 could be purchased for roughly the same amount as "5-weeks wages of one good handyman". Based on an all-new design, the 1968 140 incorporated several new design features as standard never before used on a Deere Garden tractor:
    Without ice cream, there will be darkness and chaos!
    Olympian Don Kardong

    1965 110s, 1966 110, 1967 112, 2001 LT150, 2003 GT245, 2004 GX345, 2006 X320

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    Thatís a >30,000 model 71-74. You can tell from the transmission release in front of the seat.

    The loader is homemade, the ones available aftermarket ran off the front pto.

    Hereís my 72, I used to have a 74 h1 with Johnson loader but no power steering was too much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rydplrs View Post
    Thatís a >30,000 model 71-74. You can tell from the transmission release in front of the seat.

    The loader is homemade, the ones available aftermarket ran off the front pto.

    Hereís my 72, I used to have a 74 h1 with Johnson loader but no power steering was too much.

    Rydplrs, Based upon your experience, what do you think that machine is worth as shown in the listing?

    Wasn't this the same series that the "Patio Tractors" were built from? Seems like there was 4 colors of Patio Tractors, red and white was one I have seen the most, and I think it was blue and white, and then orange and white and perhaps also a green and white? Last year, someone had a set of four different tractors all restored for sale, I think they wanted $7,500 for the set.

    Are the patio tractors something that is VIN number verifiable or was it only paint colors? Just wondering how to tell authentic patio tractors from those made to look like patio tractors through the painting, etc. Finding the seats in the colors would likely be tricky (Other than the yellow...)

    Thanks to all for their responses. The loader really threw me when looking at the machine for some reason, but now seeing the other photo's, etc. the model is much clearer.....

    So, for 5 weeks ages of a "Good Handyman" the machine could be purchased was the marketing. In 1968, the median household income was $8,630 and in 1969, it was $9,430, so that's an average of $166 per week in 1968 and $182 per week.......that would have meant $830 to $960 for the tractor, unless "Good handymen" wages were either much higher or lower than average.......

    Thanks again for the replies......so, actually, this machine is actually a 71 to 74 and not a 1960's vintage based upon the information rydplrs provided.
    BigJim55 likes this.

    1025R with Mauser Cab
    (10/2017)/ 120R FEL / RC2048 Mower / All of Ken's Bolt on Products / 60" HD Front Broom / 3 pt 45 Gallon Boom less Sprayer / CA2068 Core Aerator / I-Match / 54" Snow Plow w/ angling Quick Attach / Frontier 3 Pt Sprayer / Pallet Forks / 8 -42# Weights

    John Deere 455 (New in 9/1996) / MC519 Cart /60" MMM /47" Snow Thrower / 7'3" snow plow / Quick Hitch /
    4 -42# Weights / JD#10 Cart

    ExMark Lazer Z w/60" Deck , Billy Goat Blower , Full Stable of Echo Products





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    A 196? John Deere H3? ???

    Quote Originally Posted by SulleyBear View Post
    Rydplrs, Based upon your experience, what do you think that machine is worth as shown in the listing?

    Wasn't this the same series that the "Patio Tractors" were built from? Seems like there was 4 colors of Patio Tractors, red and white was one I have seen the most, and I think it was blue and white, and then orange and white and perhaps also a green and white? Last year, someone had a set of four different tractors all restored for sale, I think they wanted $7,500 for the set.

    Are the patio tractors something that is VIN number verifiable or was it only paint colors? Just wondering how to tell authentic patio tractors from those made to look like patio tractors through the painting, etc. Finding the seats in the colors would likely be tricky (Other than the yellow...)

    Thanks to all for their responses. The loader really threw me when looking at the machine for some reason, but now seeing the other photo's, etc. the model is much clearer.....

    So, for 5 weeks ages of a "Good Handyman" the machine could be purchased was the marketing. In 1968, the median household income was $8,630 and in 1969, it was $9,430, so that's an average of $166 per week in 1968 and $182 per week.......that would have meant $830 to $960 for the tractor, unless "Good handymen" wages were either much higher or lower than average.......

    Thanks again for the replies......so, actually, this machine is actually a 71 to 74 and not a 1960's vintage based upon the information rydplrs provided.

    I got 1400 for my 140 with a Johnson loader. It was an h1, so it would have been up to 2k in my area, up to 2500 in the Midwest. H3 does nothing for loader use, they have their own valves. The h3 is just more things that might break and less room around the loader controls. Itís a negative to me, but the market disagrees. You can get a 318 or 420 with a loader for $2500, and they have power steering. The way that sits i wouldnít look twice at over 1000.

    As for patios they were available 69-71. My first tractor was a 69 patio 112. In 69 they had the same type code as the green tractors so you need some original paint to prove itís a 69 patio. 70 and 71 had unique type codes. 69 patios were all white and the color of choice. 70-71 had black engines and fuel tanks, and a few other parts. 110/112/120/140 were all available as patios. 60/70 were not available as patios, but some white attachments were made and sold. Patio seats have a textured seatback, while green tractors were smooth. The colors were April yellow, patio red, spruce blue, and sunset orange.

    Many were repainted green by the dealers so they would sell. I canít tell if this one was painted green by the dealer and stripped by the owner, or if they owner made their own patio. Very few details point to starting out as a patio, and most of what lines up as a green tractor are details that dealers didnít do when painting them green. Iíve had many repaints go through the yard. They generally are not worth returning to patio.



    Mine is still spread around my garage mid overhaul.
    Last edited by rydplrs; 06-20-2019 at 05:32 PM.
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