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I have a few no-name sets, they all seem the same to me-probably all made in the same factory. These are machinist's tools that have crossed over into woodworking.
 

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I was a prototype machinist / designer in the automotive industry for 33 years.

The lowest cost 1 2 3 blocks will work great for any use you will need. The pair I bought for at home was $8, but that was a few years back.

The high dollar 1 2 3 blocks are mostly used in inspection rooms that are temperature controlled and need to be certified to specific industry standards. This would be way overkill for anything we do at home.

Kurt
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Kurt L. (y)
 
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Top dollar blocks are probably flat, square, and parallel within 0.0005" (a half thou), where lower grade blocks are "only" +/- 0.001. For a homeowner with a shop, lower grade is just fine! Bob
 

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It depends what your going to use them for. I have a small mill and lath that I make parts for when I restore stuff. Antique telegraph equipment, Fire alarm boxes etc.... they come in handy when I need to block something up and clamp it in place to machine Or make a part. mine are decent quality. I forget what the tolerances are but I had bought a decent set at the time. For some home tinkering, an inexpensive set would be fine.
 

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As mentioned, it depends on what you want to do. If you are inspecting on a granite surface table using a height stand, etc. and need parallel blocks within .0001" or better, I would invest in more expensive/precise blocks. If you are using them for general set-up/blocking at home, and I assume you're not checking on a granite table, probably the cheapest set would be OK.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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I was a prototype machinist / designer in the automotive industry for 33 years.

The lowest cost 1 2 3 blocks will work great for any use you will need. The pair I bought for at home was $8, but that was a few years back.

The high dollar 1 2 3 blocks are mostly used in inspection rooms that are temperature controlled and need to be certified to specific industry standards. This would be way overkill for anything we do at home.

Kurt
I composed my response in my head as soon as I saw G2's post.
You said the exact thing I was going to write.
I've been in the machining industry going on my 44th year and it's nice to hear from another brother from the field.
 

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They are handy and in my opinion, the less expensive set for a homeowner is fine, but get a set that has holes/some threads in both pieces.
What made you think about 123 blocks Keith?
 

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What made you think about 123 blocks Keith?
I saw them someplace online the other day, didn't know about them.
My wife does wood working, I do steel and we are using squares to align saw blades, wood corners, corner welds etc. I figured a cheap set would be nice if they were accurate enough.
It seems using a square most times requires 3 hands.
 

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I agree they would be fine for what you want. I have a set and I hardly use them, after watching this I didn’t realize many uses they could have.
 
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I never knew there was a real difference. I had to get ones that came with a certification, but they rust, .00005” accuracy was required and there wasn’t a treatment that would keep them rust free and measuring in spec.

At home I make my own jigs if needed, the blocks were only good for calibration checks.

My level is 3”x1”it is an excellent guide. There might be more clamp designs then there are posts in google morning, but a similar handful are useful from both.
 

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rydpirs, we us a product called Lano-Lube on inspection instruments.
I guess it is similar to a familiar product to members on here, Fluidfilm.
Lano-Lube is a paste close to a #2 grease. It can be smeared on with fingers or a small brush and a VERY thin coating is all that is required to prevent rust. It works great on thread gages, gage block sets, v blocks etc.
 

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rydpirs, we us a product called Lano-Lube on inspection instruments.
I guess it is similar to a familiar product to members on here, Fluidfilm.
Lano-Lube is a paste close to a #2 grease. It can be smeared on with fingers or a small brush and a VERY thin coating is all that is required to prevent rust. It works great on thread gages, gage block sets, v blocks etc.
Thanks, I’m actually no longer at that job. The blocks were used in a clean room, so any coating would be unacceptable contamination, but that’s someone else’s problem now.
 
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