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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys. I just bought 1023e and I’m new to the forum. I’ve got a H120 quick disconnect loader and I’ll be putting a CTA plow on this winter. My question is, should I go with a 60 in or 66 in? This would just be for my own personal driveway. Thanks for any input.
 

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I plowed all last winter (and a lot of it at that) with a 72" moose plow converted into a FEL mount. No problems whatsoever, so the 66" would get my vote.
 

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Welcome from northeastern Pennsylvania.

I agree with Pat, 66 inch blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That’s exactly the size I was thinking. They offer 60,66 and 72. I was thinking 66 but wanted some feedback. Thanks!
 

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I have 1023e and plowed last 4/winters with JD 54 inch plow. This past winter I had 2 snows I could hardly move. Really beat up my body slamming into it. This summer I found the 54 inch snowblower which I hope to be using. I have them both for now. Hope it will be easier on me. Good luck with bigger. Dan


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I have the CTA 60" blade I use on my quick hitch. Are you looking at the FEL mounted plow. I also have the CTA Grapple that I just love, Had it on my 1025R and just moved it to my 2038R. CTA does a nice job
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have the CTA 60" blade I use on my quick hitch. Are you looking at the FEL mounted plow. I also have the CTA Grapple that I just love, Had it on my 1025R and just moved it to my 2038R. CTA does a nice job
Yes, FEL plow. The CTA plows looks real nice. Nice set up you have.
 

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The CTA FEL 66” is what I will be getting. Looks like the best option available. The JD 10 only has manual angle so that is out.
 

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I took two 54" John Deere plows and made them into one, as I ended up with two blades (it's a long story and kind of funny, I should tell it sometime..:laugh:...)

I do a LOT of snow plowing. Like 165 hours on my tractor just last winter. Here is a picture of the set up. I plow for nearly 20 neighbors. My plow is 87" wide, so 7'3".....



Here is what it looks like sitting inside a normal residential garage door. Note the 54" plow sitting to the side of the big plow. While they are the same height, they sure look differently when sitting next to one another when the 54" plow doesn't have the top flap, etc.



If you are using a John Deere front Quick Attach hitch, the number one concern with the width of the blade is the ability to angle the blade while lifted and have the corners of the blade clear the road.

Amazingly, the 1023e, 1026r 1025r have LESS CLEARANCE than the front quick attach hitch used on the x7xx and older 445, 455 series machines, etc.. I never measured exactly how much less, but I can tell you that my 455 can lift and angle the 7'3" blade (just barely) and have the corners clear the pavement. The 1 series will NOT clear the corners when turned. It's not even a matter of "being close".

When I bought my rig about 10 months ago, I bought a 54" blade with the rubber squeegee plow edge and the markers, just in case for some reason I had an issue with my new 1025r and the custom made plow set up. (Its the one shown under the water bottles in the photo.) I had my custom plow sitting on a pallet outside when the new machine arrived and I drove up to the pallet to pick the plow up with the 1 series. Here is a picture of the plow sitting on the pallet.



Let me tell you, I was NOT HAPPY when I could not pick that plow blade off the pallet with the new 1 series mounted front Quick Attach hitch. So, I thought about it for awhile, in fact, I plowed with the new 54" blade and I was extremely unhappy. Then I started thinking about alternatives and I thought about a snow pusher. But I angle the blade when I plow at least a hundred times while plowing on my route. I have video's of my tractor plowing (hours and hours of video, in fact) and I frequently change the angle for maximum efficiency, sometimes a dozen times or more on one driveway. So, a snow pusher wouldn't work for my needs, as I am angling for effectiveness and efficiency all of the time.

I came very close to ordering the entire Artillian front plate for plowing snow, but I really didn't want to plow snow with the FEL arms as it extends the length of the rig and many of the areas I plow, since they are all residential driveways (and privately owned roads) are pretty tight. Plus, then you get into adding another valve and other pieces to maintain the full functions of the plow and the FEL. So, I rolled this over in my mind and fretted about how the new machine couldn't lift the plow like the old one, which was smaller, did lift it.

So, I was going to put the FEL back on my machine to lift the plow off the pallet and move it to the driveway and I was so frustrated, I just picked up the plow and carried it by hand to the driveway. It's not super heavy, but it's probably 120 pounds. Then, I mounted it on the front Quick Attach, since the plow was no longer sitting on the pallet and I angled it and sure enough, the corners hit the road surface when the plow is lifted.

But then I got thinking about it and decided to use the plow like a snow pusher, but only use the angle feature when the plow is either on the surface, or within a couple of inches of it. It works just fine. The only issue is that I have to always have the plow straight when I lift it or lower it and then I can angle it. I very quickly adapted to this method of plowing and within an hour of plowing, it was as natural and the reversed directions of the FEL controls on this machine verses my old machine. The larger blade worked out great when I changed my operation technique.

Moral of the story, get the largest plow which will angle on your front hitch amount and I know the 66" will (it should) and I would even bet the 72" plow would angle. After all, my plow is another 15" wider than the 72" plow sold.

Here are some other tips which I consider CRITICAL regarding plowing snow....

1. I would highly recommend the rubber squeegee plow edge on whatever plow you end up using. Not only does it do a great job clearing the pavement right down to the smooth surface, if you get the right rubber edge, it won't tear up the sod or grass when you push snow onto it with the proper down pressure on the plow. I can honestly tell you that I can't think of a reason to NOT use the rubber plow edge. In my opinion, its the only way to plow. Not only is it easier on the driveway surface and the lawn, it permits the plow to conform to imperfections in the surface and clean it very effectively. Also, the "banging" of dropping the plow is eliminated.

2. Adjust your plow so the squeegee is in contact with the driveway or road surface and then the plow shoe should be 1/4" to 1/2" higher than that rubber edge height when sitting on the surface. With the rubber plow edge, there is no need to wear out the plow shoes or have them mar the surface. Let the replaceable rubber edge take the brunt of the work.

3. If you are in an area where the average snowfall is more than 6" deep, I STRONGLY recommend the top flap on the plow, like is shown on my plow. It makes plowing so much easier and it also prevents the accumulated snow from going over the top of the blade and onto the hitch, where it can cause icing problems with the plow angling cylinder and the hydraulic fittings. You can fabricate your own plow flap, as I did or you can purchase some and modify them to fit the plow. But this is very handy in keeping the snow all in front of the blade and its what "rolls the snow" when you are plowing deep snow and pushing it a distance.

4. I do NOT use the plow float feature. I found the float feature puts more weight on the plow than necessary and it makes steering more difficult. Instead, I found the "right touch" when lowering the blade and it works far better than trying to use the float feature. I tried in vane to get the float feature to work and it simply was a waste of my time.

5. Make sure you have plenty of rear ballast weight. The larger the front plow, the more important the rear ballast. I carry the weight of the cab which is roughly 400 pounds, plus another 400 to 550 pounds on the rear 3 point hitch carry all. I have not had to use tire chains or Terra Grips or other traction aides. Don't be shy with the rear ballast, you will see when you have too much as the front end will be too light. The difference in plowing without the rear weight and with the rear weight is simply amazing.

6. Make sure your plow blade has a trip feature so when you encounter an obstruction, the plow blade can flip forward and that is can properly function. This is another reason I didn't go with the snow pusher as this safety feature is critical, as far as I am concerned. I once broke my hand and also tore the hood off my old tractor when my knee caps struck the rear edge of the hood when the plow trip feature failed to work because the "J" pins had snapped back into place.

When my tractor came to a very abrupt stop, I slid forward on the seat and my knees slammed into the dash where the rear edge of the hood protrudes and the force of my knees sheared off 4 mounting points on the hood. It also bruised my chest and fractured some ribs. I was only going 5 or 6 mph but when you stop NOW, the momentum slams your body forward. I know I wouldn't want to do it again. That tractor didn't have a seat belt, but I will also admit I don't wear the seat belt on my 1025r, either......

I would be glad to answer any other questions or thought you might have about the plow set up. I had all kinds of skeptics telling me this plow would never be able to be handled by first, the 455 lawn tractor it was on and then, on this 1 series. I have plowed all kinds of snow and depths up to 15" to 18" without any problems. When the snow is wet and heavy, you just slow down and adjust your plowing if the weight becomes too much, but I have yet to have that happen.

I also have the 47" two stage snow thrower and the 60" rotary broom for this machine, not to mention the front end loader and bucket if needed. You will never regret going with the larger plow blade. In fact, If I were you I would be thinking the 66" or even 72", but make sure to heed the advice I numbered above so it works to the best of the machines abilities.
 

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