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with a 70lbs quick hitch and 200 pound 5 ft scrape blade be efficient enough rear wieght to do light duty work with FEL for counter weight?
 

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You can try it you will know right away. Try it on level ground if you rear wheels come off the ground then its not heavy enough. I use a ballast box the by itself weights 150lbs then i use cement bricks in 3/4 the way full then chain on top. Good luck and carry your loads low to ground
 

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moweec, I have a 1025, which I assume has similar weight characteristics as your 1023. I moved 10 ton of gravel (not in one trim I might add :laugh:) with ZERO ballast. I filled the bucket as full as I could, traveled with it LOW and SLOW, and had no issues whatsoever! I will add, these are the few times I put up the ROPS! Also, avoid ANY side slop. Oh, and P.S. - my ROPS STILL won't fit in the shed in the up position, no matter how hard I try :banghead:
 

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The Approved Tires and Ballast for 1023E, 1025R, and 1026R Tractors is listed below:

Approved Ballast 1023e 1025r 1026r.png

John Deere wants to see 601 pounds on the rear hitch AND fluid filled tires for front end loader work. For light duty work you can probably get by with less, but keep in mind that your loader can pick up enough weight to lift the rear tires if there isn't enough ballast. Even if it seems ok, a front load can lift the rear wheels if you hit a dip (or travel too fast) with the load too high. The other issue with not having enough ballast is you can overload the front axle.

You should never be doing front end loader work without rear ballast. In your case, the rear blade will stick further back than the ballast box, so the 200 lb blade will have a greater impact as ballast than 200 lbs right at the rear hitch. That being said, you will want to keep your bucket loads light.

The really bad thing about the rear tires lifting off the ground is the front axle is NOT rigid and fixed in place; it is on a pivot. If the rear tires lift, the tractor can pivot on the front axle pivot point and tip over without warning.

A few simple rules listed in your loader manual (LINK):

1. Always use rear ballast when doing front end loader work.
2. Keep the load low and the speed slow when the bucket is loaded.
3. ROPS up, seat belt ON (or if the ROPS is down, seat belt OFF)
 

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Oh, and P.S. - my ROPS STILL won't fit in the shed in the up position, no matter how hard I try :banghead:
Your just not going fast enough to make room for it. Don't give up yet.

Just kidding :lol:
 

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with a 70lbs quick hitch and 200 pound 5 ft scrape blade be efficient enough rear wieght to do light duty work with FEL for counter weight?
You may get away with it many times. It will be the one time you was not watching properly, turned too sharp on a small grade with the bucket raised or just plain not on game that day that you will regret, if your lucky enough, the fact that you didn't have the proper ballast. With the ROPS folded, because it is inconvenient to get off the tractor, let's hope your not on too much of a slope and it only lay's on it's side and does not roll, Roll Over Protection (ROP). But this would be your choice. Most folks on here that have been around tractors will tell you to get the proper ballast. So let the flames begin :fire: :munch:
 

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Oh, and P.S. - my ROPS STILL won't fit in the shed in the up position, no matter how hard I try :banghead:
Your just not going fast enough to make room for it. Don't give up yet.

Just kidding :lol:
I swear, I've spent hours trying to design (in my head) some kind of warning system capable of notifying an idiot it just ain't gonna fit!! Some thoughts are: A reverse backup sensor mounted to the ROPS, an idiot light on the dash - either triggered by a switch on the ROPS, or manually turned on when ROPS is up. Just seems when I'm doing FEL work that I feel requires the ROPS, I'm busy planning my routes, evaluating each move to make sure I'm not doing something I shouldn't, etc., there just isn't enough brain cells left at the end of the day to remember to lower the darn thing before heading to the garage. Keep in mind 90% of what I do is mowing (too many trees to us the ROPS), so it just doesn't become habit. Guess I'll just keep straightening the rollup door.
 

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with a 70lbs quick hitch and 200 pound 5 ft scrape blade be efficient enough rear wieght to do light duty work with FEL for counter weight?
Depends what you call light duty work. I've done it with no more then a box blade on the back. Like was said, you'll know as soon as you go to pick up the FEL. I've done some heavy work with the FEL with the box blade and 6 suit case weights on the back and it's worked. You have to watch where you drive and what you're driving over. With a FEL load of gravel, box blade and 6 suit case weights is how I did this:
0827151206.jpg
From the bottom of the pic I'd drive up the hill and then back down it to get where I wanted to go. As you can see I had everything low. Doing it this way I could lower the box blade should it not have worked out to stop me. Kept my driving sideways to a minimum. You will have to stay on your toes and don't drive very fast. Always keep your hand on the controls in case you have to drop the BB or the FEL. This was in the FEL:
0827151159c.jpg
This was heavy. Can it be done, yes. Safely? If you're very careful. I did 3 pick up loads of this stuff. Many trips and always the same way.
 

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I swear, I've spent hours trying to design (in my head) some kind of warning system capable of notifying an idiot it just ain't gonna fit!! Some thoughts are: A reverse backup sensor mounted to the ROPS, an idiot light on the dash - either triggered by a switch on the ROPS, or manually turned on when ROPS is up. Just seems when I'm doing FEL work that I feel requires the ROPS, I'm busy planning my routes, evaluating each move to make sure I'm not doing something I shouldn't, etc., there just isn't enough brain cells left at the end of the day to remember to lower the darn thing before heading to the garage. Keep in mind 90% of what I do is mowing (too many trees to us the ROPS), so it just doesn't become habit. Guess I'll just keep straightening the rollup door.
Strap something that will pop along the top of the ROPS...Balloons maybe? Plus if a party breaks out you'll be ready! :laugh:

Seriously tho...anything that will crunch loudly and not hurt anything like a big chunk of styrofoam maybe tape a thick piece on and it will crunch and spill foam pieces on your head. Or something like this...Maybe you'll find something laying around...

I don't know if you can point these sensors or if you would get too many false positives...
https://www.amazon.com/Hopkins-60100VA-nVISION-Sensor-System/dp/B002XUXUTS

Or could you get a long enough foam tube(The kind used to wrap pipes) and mount it so it sticks straight forward over your head and when you see it bend or hit the door it would remind you...Or mount a stick with an orange end like for curb marking.

Or hang a curtain down about head level on the garage or shed door and when it hits your face , you'll wonder whats going on and reminds you to stop.
 

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moweec, I have a 1025, which I assume has similar weight characteristics as your 1023. I moved 10 ton of gravel (not in one trim I might add :laugh:) with ZERO ballast. I filled the bucket as full as I could, traveled with it LOW and SLOW, and had no issues whatsoever! I will add, these are the few times I put up the ROPS! Also, avoid ANY side slop. Oh, and P.S. - my ROPS STILL won't fit in the shed in the up position, no matter how hard I try :banghead:
Let everyone on the site if you decide sell or trade in your tractor. We'll be the first ones not to buy ,,had to see what damage you may have done to your front axle with ZERO ballast.

From what I've read , at least you traveled slow and had it low.
 

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moweec, I have a 1025, which I assume has similar weight characteristics as your 1023. I moved 10 ton of gravel (not in one trim I might add
) with ZERO ballast. I filled the bucket as full as I could, traveled with it LOW and SLOW, and had no issues whatsoever! I will add, these are the few times I put up the ROPS! Also, avoid ANY side slop. Oh, and P.S. - my ROPS STILL won't fit in the shed in the up position, no matter how hard I try
Let everyone on the site if you decide sell or trade in your tractor. We'll be the first ones not to buy ,,had to see what damage you may have done to your front axle with ZERO ballast.

From what I've read , at least you traveled slow and had it low.
I don't mean to be a contrarian...but I've read this on this forum many times, that ballast will save damage to the front axle by offsetting the weight in a FEL, and I just can't agree that it will make any significant difference. Yes, ballast will offset some front end weight, but this is using the rear axle as the fulcrum, which is much further from the bucket than your rear ballast, meaning you'd probably need 600 lbs of ballast on a 3pt hitch to offset 200 lbs on the front axle.

Also, the front axles on these tractors are overbuilt. You will max out your hydraulics before you'd even come close to hurting that axle. So...maybe after 2000 hours you might see a detectable difference in wear in the spindle bearings, or the pivot bushing.

No doubt however...ballast is critical for stability and safety. Just my opinions...
 

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Well, let's not beat this dead horse any further. It's up to the owner/operator to read, understand, and operate their equipment as outlined in the supplied manuals. We all know it's physically impossible to reach anywhere near the full capabilities of these machines without proper ballast. It's like buying a V8 and killing 4 cylinders all while asking it to tow a trailer. Yup, sure, it can be done. But you'll be amazed once the other 4 cylinders are working as advertised. :good2:
 

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I tried moving a heavy load with no ballast on the rear....once. almost turned over twice on a very gentle slope. Had to drop the load very quuckly both times. Now I at least carry the box blade. If I'm moving buckets full of stone, I grab the RC1048. Feels worlds more stable, plus it seems the extra weight and traction helps with pushing into piles.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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The really bad thing about the rear tires lifting off the ground is the front axle is NOT rigid and fixed in place; it is on a pivot. If the rear tires lift, the tractor can pivot on the front axle pivot point and tip over without warning.
Amen brother. My 650 is heavier and has a higher center of gravity than the 1 series but...

When I got the tractor and before I made a ballast box, I was taking a scoop of crushed stone from the front to the back yard for a small project. The side yard is graded as is typical for drainage - a few degree slope at most. I was carrying the stone with the bucket about a foot off the ground on the "side slope" and suddenly lost traction because one of the rear wheels was off the ground. Shifting my weight (which is considerable) was enough to replant the back end, but the pucker factor was high.

It takes very little slope for bad things to happen and there is almost no warning it's about to happen except experience.

Al
 

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So going off of what I have read, correct me if I am wrong in my perception of things:

-having rear ballast will not hurt anything, long term, in regards to helping distribute load from the FEL weather it is light or heavy.

-ballast seems to help me even when running my ratchet rake, to help get more bite and traction.

-I am now wanting to make a 30 gallon drum and fill it with concrete which should give me in the neighborhood of 550-600lbs of counterweight. will this be too much or should I only fill it 1/2-3/4 full and have #400 or so? I also have fluid filled rear tires.

-I have also seen where people run a chain stay on counter weight drums to keep the weight off of the hydraulics/creeping down over time? is that the best route to take?

thanks!
 
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